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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables


There are hundreds of periodic tables in web space, but there is only one comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

Periodic Table formulations since 2010, by date:

2010     Periodic Arch of The Elements
2010     3-D Strange Periodic Table
2010     Marks & Marks: Newlands Revisited
2010     Keaggy's Periodic Table of Periodic Tables
2010     Tai Chi Periodic Table
2010     Recipe For A Human Shirt
2010     Jovanovic's 2D Periodic Table
2010     Fahimi Formulations
2010     Vajra Periodic Table
2010     Pauling Spheron Periodic Table
2010     Bing Periodic Table
2010     Pyykkö's Extended Elements
2010     Harrison Spiral Periodic Table
2010     Spiral of Atoms and Their Periodic Table
2010     Cartogram Periodic Tables
2010     Scandium Group and The Periodic Table
2010     Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table - Element No.155
2010     World's Smallest Periodic Table
2010     Khipu or Quipu Periodic Table
2010     Circular Periodic Table of Elements
2010     Harrington Projection for The 270 AMU Structure
2010     Neutronic Schema of the Elements
2010     Newlands Revisited – Poster
2011     Bayeh's Theoretical Periodic Table of Elements
2011     Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table
2011     Bayeh's Theoretical 3D Periodic Tables
2011     Piazzalunga's Circular Periodic Table
2011     Pacholek's Multipipe 3D Periodic Table
2011     Alper's Simplified Periodic Table: Elements Ordered By Their Sub-Shell
2011     Makeyev's Periodic Table
2011     Fractional Janet Left-Step Periodic Chart
2011     Wikipedia Long Form Periodic Table
2011     Alashvili Rotating Spherical Periodikal Tabel
2011     Normal vs Correction Shell "Pi Paradox" for 1-270 AMUs
2011     Elements Known in the Year 2011
2011     Suggested Periodic Table Up To Z r 172, Based on Dirac–Fock Calculations
2012     Mathematical Expression of Mendeleev’s Periodic Law
2012     Zigzag Periodic Table
2012     Eggenkamp's Periodic Table
2012     JR's Chemistry Set
2012     Magnetic Periodic Table
2012     Schematic Periodic Table of Double-Charged Cations
2012     Extended Periodic Table - Alternative
2012     Rihani's 120 Element Periodic Table Formulations
2012     Compact Mendeleev-Moseley-Seaborg Periodic Table (CMMSPT)
2012     Srivaths-Labarca Periodic Table
2012     3D Illustrated Alexander Arrangement of Elements
2012     Vortic Periodic Table in Marquetry
2012     Makeyev's Verticle Form Periodic Table
2012     Wheelshaped Table of Elements
2012     Bettermann Periodic Table
2012     Piazzalunga's Pyramidal Periodic Table Formulations
2013     Twin Spiral Pi Trinomial - Based Periodic Table
2013     Macro-Valence Cells vs Jovian Image and Red Spot Location Periodic Table
2013     Fattah's Periodic Table
2013     7 Elemental Chemical Synthesis
2013     Electronegativity Chart (Leach)
2013     MCAS Electron Orbital Filling
2013     Higgs Boson and Fundamental Particle/Force Periodic Tables
2013     Fattah's Extended Periodic Table
2013     Proton Configuration Periodic Table
2013     4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table
2013     Shapes Periodic Table
2013     3D Left Step Periodic Table
2013     From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement
2013     Periodic Pyramid
2013     Bernard Periodic Spiral
2013     Underground Map of the Elements
2013     Matrix Series Periodic Table
2013     Music Notes of Periodic Table
2013     Averaged Ionisation Potential Periodic Table
2013     Model Wooden Periodic Table
2013     Muradjan's Mathematical Structure of The Periodic Table
2013     Atomic Periodic Town
2013     Ye Olde Periodic Table
2014     Lado's Periodic Table Series Analysis
2014     Jodogne's Janet New Color Periodic Table
2014     Jodogne's New Color Table
2014     ADOMAH Periodic Table Glass Cube
2014     Gutierrez Samanez's Binodic Form of the Periodic Table (Video)
2014     Cross Periodic Table
2014     Zambon's Periodic Table Based on Triads
2014     Eadie's Periodic Electron Configuration
2014     Chandra's Polar Plot Periodic Table
2014     Metallic Character Table
2014     Janet Rajeuni
2014     UVS Periodic Tables
2014     Clock Periodic Table
2014     Belikov's Modular Periodic Table of Chemical Elements
2014     Jodogne's Janet New Colour Periodic Table
2014     Aco Muradjan's New Notation Scheme
2014     Arrangement of Elements 7th Order & Element Sequences
2014     Schaeffer's IUPAC Periodic Table Quantum Mechanics Consistent
2015     UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology
2015     Quantum Fold Periodic Table
2015     ADOMAH Periodic Table and Normal Distribution
2015     Pams Quantum Periodic Table
2015     Heart Periodic Table
2016     Valentine Periodic Table
2016     NAWA's byobu-Janet Periodic Table
2016     Advanced Spiral Periodic Classification of the Elements
2016     Triadic Networks
2016     Clock Face Periodic Table
2016     Sensu or Fan Periodic Table
2016     KAS Periodic Table
2016     Harrington Periodic Tables
2016     Lindsay's Periodic Table
2016     Complete Periodic Table Chemistry Clock: H to Og
2016     Instructables 3D Periodic Table
2017     Alternative Periodic Table
2017     New Rendering of ADOMAH Periodic Table
2017     NAWA Periodic Tables
2017     Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table UPDATED
2017     Clock Prism Periodic Table, Braille Version
2017     Stewart's Chemosphere


2010

Periodic Arch of The Elements

Cynthia K. Whitney of Galilean Electrodynamics writes: "In his paper Explaining the periodic table, and the role of chemical triad, Eric Scerri mentioned the existence of at least four different candidate places for Hydrogen: Group 1 (alkali metals - Lithium, etc.), Group 17 (halogens - Fluorine, etc.), Group 14 (Carbon, etc.), or off the Periodic Table entirely, because it is so odd! The four-fold multiplicity (and maybe more) of candidate places for Hydrogen triggered in me the following thought: the excessive multiplicity of candidate places may have to do with the rectangular nature of the Periodic Tables under consideration there." Read more in this pdf file.

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2010

3-D Strange Periodic Table

As Lewis Page of The Register puts it: "Top flight international reverse-alchemy boffins say they have managed to transmute gold into an entirely new form of 'negatively strange' antihypernucleic antimatter...", here.

The effect is to add a third dimension of quark strangeness to the periodic table. Read the abstract by the STAR Collaboration.

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2010

Marks & Marks: Newlands Revisited

Marks & Marks – The Marks bros. – published "A periodic table explicitly for chemists rather than physicists. It is derived from Newlands’ columns. It solves many problems such as the positions of hydrogen, helium, beryllium, zinc and the lanthanoids but all within a succinct format."   email here

E. G. Marks & J. A. Marks, Newlands revisited: a display of the periodicity of the chemical elements for chemists, Found Chem (2010).

 

 

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2010

Periodic Table of Periodic Tables

Keaggy, of www.keaggy.com, has put together a rather cool 'Periodic Table of Periodic Tables', clearly using this web site as one of the major resources:

 

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2010

Tai Chi Periodic Table

Joyous Wong, , a student at the Hebei Normal University, China presents a periodic table based on the Chinese cultural background of Tai Chi:

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2010

Recipe For A Human Shirt

By Sean Fallon and available from Fashionably Geek, A Recipe For Humans Shirt:

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2010

Jovanovic's 2D Periodic Table

Jovanovic's 2D Periodic Table is based on the atomic number Z and the electron configuration of the elements. There is a full explanatory pdf file on the website:

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2010

Fahimi Formulations

Peyman Fahimi has posted some periodic table formulations to www.img98.com, these can be found here, here, here, here & here:

The two most interesting are are shown below:

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2010

Vajra Periodic Table

The Vajra Periodic Table, which can be found at APM Periodic Tables, lays out according to electron orbitals and thus gives insights into the electron structure surrounding the nucleus. The nucleus organizes with different rules and thus a different periodic table is needed to visualize the nuclear bindings:

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2010

Pauling Spheron Periodic Table

The Pauling Spheron Periodic Table, can be found at APM Periodic Tables.

Linus Pauling was a brilliant physicist who tended to think outside the mainstream. One of his many contributions to science was his spheron model for the nucleus. The word "spheron" does not mean the nucleus is spherical (although it may be), it refers to Pauling's idea that clusters might form in the nucleus. For example, a nucleus may contain a stable helium nucleus within a larger uranium nucleus. Thus, when uranium decays, it releases a helium atom. Other elements, such as oxygen, may also cluster within larger elements. This makes sense since certain atoms like helium and oxygen are more strongly bound than other elements:

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2010

Bing Periodic Table

Microsoft's Bing search engine has a rather extensive way of finding element data & information that avoids any formal PT representation:

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2010

Pyykkö's Extended Elements

From an RSC new page: Pekka Pyykkö at the University of Helsinki has used a highly accurate computational model to predict electronic structures and therefore the periodic table positions of elements up to proton number 172 - far beyond the limit of elements that scientists can currently synthesise.

From the paper, A suggested periodic table up to Z = 172, based on Dirac–Fock calculations on atoms and ions:

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2010

Harrison Spiral Periodic Table

This spiral, inspired by Stewart's Chemical Galaxy, is based on the modern periodic table with the elements strictly arranged in the increasing order of their atomic number and in accordance with their electron configurations.

The spiral separates the elements into the eight dominant 'A' groups of normal elements, and the eight corresponding 'B' subgroups of transitional and inner transitional elements, which have been incorporated as the inner spiral. The organisation of the elements closely follows H.G. Deming's 1923 Periodic Table where A B numeration was first utilized to correspond the characteristic oxides of the 'B' groups to those of the 'A' groups. The result of this design places Group VIII, the triads Fe, Co, Ni, etc. as a subgroup of Group 0 (or 18 Helium Group) which conflicts with some modern periodic tables, though broadly agrees with Deming's original proposal (VIIIA and VIIIB).

Hydrogen, which generally cannot be considered as part of any group, has been placed with the Fluorine group VII which appears its natural place in the spiral. Common names have been used where practicable to make the table more educational and reader-friendly. Element symbols have been included in the expanded poster of this table.

Look at a larger PDF.

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2010

Spiral of Atoms and Their Periodic Table

Page 8 of my website (in Russian) shows The Spiral of Atoms and Their Periodic Table, which depicts a spiral disk of atoms with a periodic table of their relative masses.

This information clarifies the options published in the editions of my book The Axiomatics of Nature (2007-2009). Mark Adelman Samuilovich (Mark S. Eidelman)

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2010

Cartogram Periodic Tables

Webelements have produced a poster with various atomic & elemental properties represented in cartographic form.

From the Webelements shop: "Periodic table cartograms are periodic table grids distorted using a computer algorithm so that the areas of the element squares are in proportion to a periodic table property. This is the first poster to show periodic properties plotted in this way".

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2010

Scandium Group and The Periodic Table

Pieter Thyssen and Koen Binnemans discuss (CRC Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, Chapter 248. Accommodation of the Rare Earths in the Periodic Table: A Historical Analysis) the confusion surrounding the members of and the positioning of the scandium group. There are three forms commonly used.

A medium-long form and long form depiction of the 15LaAc periodic table. As should be clear from the long form periodic table, an intermingling occurs between the f-block and d-block:

 

A medium-long form and long form depiction of the 14CeTh periodic table. The d-block has been torn apart in the long form, due to the insertion of the f-block:

 

A medium-long form and long form depiction of the 14LaAc periodic table. The 14LaAc periodic table is in perfect agreement with the Madelung rule:

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2010

Upper Limit in Mendeleev's Periodic Table - Element No.155

This book (PDF), by Albert Khazan, represents a result of many-year theoretical research, which manifested hyperbolic law in Mendeleev's Periodic Table.

According to [Khazan's] law, an upper limit (heaviest element) exists in Mendeleev's Table, whose atomic mass is 411.66 and No.155. It is shown that the heaviest element No.155 can be a reference point in nuclear reactions. Due to symmetry of the hyperbolic law, the necessity of the Table of Anti-Elements, consisting of anti-substance, has been predicted. This manifests that the found hyperbolic law is universal, and the Periodic Table is common for elements and anti-elements.

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2010

World's Smallest Periodic Table

The World's Smallest Periodic Table:

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2010

Khipu or Quipu Periodic Table

The Khipu or Quipu or Talking Knot Periodic Table, developed by Julio Antonio Gutierrez Samanez.

Google translated from the Spanish pdf file:

"As a result of bringing together each pair of periods in a single function or binod, the author has found a new regular on the subject, which has been defined as a new quantum number, since the number of orders or regulations binod growth elements in the table, under the appearance of pairs of new types of quantum structures or periods whose organization responds to a simple mathematical function: a parable of the type Y = 4 X ^ 2 - In this case report: a) That the strings correspond to pairs of periods or binod and knots are double for items with orbital s (in red), six nodes for p in orange, 10 yellow d knots and 14 knots for green f . b) That in each binod or rope, appear regularly in pairing mode or dual, new quantum or orbital structures, such as moving from within the orbital previous binod.":

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2010

Circular Periodic Table of Elements

Michael Paukner's circular periodic table is one alternative to the standard periodic table of the elements:

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2010

Harrington Projection for The 270 AMU Structure

From Bill Harrington, Founder/CTO of Rainforest Reactor Research and Temporal Dynamics Laboratory, comes a Harrington Projection for The 270 AMU Structure :

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2010

Neutronic Schema of the Elements

The Neutronic Schema of the Elements, with LATIN NOTATION by Families and Groups, by Earth/matriX, Science Today, 11" x 17" laminated, color, shows each element of the periodic table with its notation in Latin letters instead of their historically accidental names and symbols:

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2010

Newlands Revisited – Poster

At the beginning of last year (Meyers, 2009), a IUPAC editorial offered "something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue".

Marks and Marks 2010 (M&M) preserves the old subgroups (Newlands' columns) that were a feature of all short forms, although M&M would then have been described as a 'medium form' (14 groups) in contrast to Mendeleyev's 'short form' (8 groups) or Werner's 'long form' (32 groups). M&M naturally continues the grouping of the lanthanoids/actinoids whose initial four groups were also included in 'short form' tables.

The logic of the arrangement of the s-elements is a new feature. It recognizes the chemical subgroups of hydrogen, viz. the alkali metals and the halogens, and of helium, viz. the alkaline earth metals and the inert gases. It is interesting to note that subgroups differ chemically from each other inversely as the azimuth, i.e. Li:F > Ca:Zn > La:Lu.

The whole idea is, of course, borrowed from Newlands. The group numbers are borrowed from valency but also from electronic structure in that the number of s, p, d, or f subgroups corresponds to the Pauli maximum for each. Finally, the mnemonic reflects that most elementary introduction to chemistry: alkalis turn Litmus blue.

From this start, the p-bloc is red, the transition elements yellow and the "rare earth" elements green, as argued in the M&M paper. The numbering of groups I - XIV is unambiguous, it is less than IUPAC's arbitrary 18 groups, it preserves subgroups and satisfactorily accommodates hydrogen and the lanthanoids/actinoids.

As required by Leigh (2009), this table is clear, simple and brief.

Newlands Revisited

GJ Leigh "Periodic Tables and IUPAC" Chemistry International 2009, 31: 4-6. EG Marks & JA Marks "Newlands Revisited: a periodic table for chemists" Foundations of Chemistry 2010, 12: 85-93. F Meyers "From the Editor" Chemistry International 2009, 31:1-2.

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2011

Bayeh's Theoretical Periodic Table of Elements

"The modern periodic table is based on quantum numbers and blocks, many problems faced the scientists and researchers when arranging the elements in the traditional and modern periodic tables as placing some elements in the incorrect place as (He) Helium, (La) Lanthanide and many others elements..." read the full pdf article here:

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2011

Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table

Eric Scerri made contact, writing: "Following the discussions on Periodic Table debate on the Chemistry Views website here, and as a result of recent turns, I have developed a new periodic table which I believe combines virtues of the Stowe table and also the Janet left-step table. I propose the name Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table. The explanation is posted on the Chemistry Views debate pages.

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2011

Bayeh's Theoretical 3D Periodic Tables

From Bayeh Claude: "I have designed these periodic tables as developments of Bayeh's Theoretical Periodic Table, but I have introduced new shapes and 3D versions":

  • Crocodile Periodic Table
  • Ship Periodic Table
  • Snake Periodic Table
  • Spiral Periodic Table
  • Spiral rectangular Periodic Table
  • Spiral triangular Periodic Table

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2011

Piazzalunga's Circular Periodic Table

"My name is Marco Piazzalunga, I'm from Bergamo, Italy and i'm 12 years old. I am very interested about chemistry and about your website dedicated to the periodic tables of elements. I've made one graphic version of the periodic table based on a "round" model and i would like to know your opinion about it. I'm sending you the file attached. I hope you enjoy it":

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2011

Pacholek's Multipipe 3D Periodic Table

"I've recently invented a new type of periodic table. My table is 3-dimensional and is similar to the ADOMAH Periodic Table, but it's also very different from the ADOMAH Tetrahedron. Its main advantage is being fully geometric in the plane spanned by n, l and n+l quantum numbers."

Take a look at the Picasa images here and here:

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2011

Alper's Quantum Table of The Elements

Ben Alper's Quantum Table of The Elements is a simplified periodic table which shows the elements are ordered by the energy level of their sub shells and by the number of electrons in their outer shell. Such a layout is both representative of the structure of atoms and has utility since it is easy to use.

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2011

Makeyev's Periodic Table

By Alexander Makeyev – integrated interdisciplinary researcher, inventor, poet – a long pdf document (1093 pages in Russian, here) that contains a new formulation:

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2011

Fractional Janet Left-Step Periodic Chart

On Willie Johnson Jr.'s website – Gyroscopic Force Theory – can be found the Fractional Janet Left-Step Periodic Chart:

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2011

Wikipedia Long Form Periodic Table

Wikipedia has now adopted a now adopted a long form periodic table to link between the chemical elements. Scroll to the bottom of this page:

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2011

Alashvili Rotating Spherical Periodikal Tabel

A nice rotating, spherical (3-D) periodic table by Tornike Alashvili, from Georgia, which can be viewed here as a .swf image:

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2011

Normal vs Correction Shell "Pi Paradox" for 1-270 AMUs

From Bill Harrington, Founder/CTO of Rainforest Reactor Research and Temporal Dynamics Laboratory, comes a Normal vs Correction Shell "Pi Paradox" for 1-270 AMUs:

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2011

Elements Known in the Year 2011

Elements known in the year 2011, taken from this Wikipedia page... all the elements to 118 are now known:

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2011

Suggested Periodic Table Up To Z ≤ 172, Based on Dirac–Fock Calculations

A suggested periodic table up to Z ≤ 172, based on Dirac–Fock calculations on atoms and ions
Pekka Pyykkö
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2011,13, 161-168
DOI: 10.1039/C0CP01575J

Extended Average Level (EAL) Dirac–Fock calculations on atoms and ions agree with earlier work in that a rough shell-filling order for the elements.

[This new] Periodic Table develops further that of Fricke, Greiner and Waber [Theor. Chim. Acta 1971, 21, 235] by formally assigning the elements 121–164 to (nlj) slots on the basis of the electron configurations of their ions. Simple estimates are made for likely maximum oxidation states, i, of these elements M in their MXi compounds:

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2012

Mathematical Expression of Mendeleev’s Periodic Law

Valery Tsimmerman, of the ADOMAH Tetrahedron periodic table formulation and the Perfect Periodic Table website, presents a Mathematical Expression of Mendeleev’s Periodic Law:

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2012

Zigzag Periodic Table

In this periodic table we can see that the elements are arranged in a different way. Hydrogen is placed in between (and above) fluorine and lithium. This is because there is an issue on the placement of hydrogen as it has the properties of both alkali metals and halogens.

How to read the Zigzag periodic table

For periods (1), (2B), (3B) etc. read from right to left.
For periods (2A), (3A), (4A) etc. read from left to right

The arrows will guide you through the periodic table:

  • Periodic Trends Atomic Radius- When moving opposite to the zigzag line in a particular period, the atomic radius of the elements increase.
  • Metallic Character- Metallic Character decreases when moving along the zigzag line in a particular period.
  • Ionization Energy- When moving along the zigzag line in a particular period, the ionization energy increases. Electron Affinity- Electron Affinity increases when moving along the zigzag line in a particular period.

By Akash Srivaths, High School Student, Chennai, India

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2012

Eggenkamp's Periodic Table

Hans EggenkampI presents a periodic table based upon the table by Mendeleev, in combination with the lanthanides and actinides as suggested by Laing. A simplified Pourbaix (Eh-pH) diagram is shown for each element, colored according to the oxidation stage showing the systematics in the Periodic Table:

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2012

JR's Chemistry Set

For the iPhone and iPad, JR's Chemistry Set makes chemistry interesting and fun to learn. Based upon the innovative Rota Period, it is a handy and powerful reference tool for chemistry enthusiasts and practitioners at all ages and all levels.

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2012

Magnetic Periodic Table

By Particle Zoo, sellers of Higgs Boson and Anticharm Quark soft toys, comes a magnetic periodic table which you can arrange into any formulation you like!

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2012

Schematic Periodic Table of Double-Charged Cations

N. S. Imyanitov / The Periodic Law. Formulations, Equations, Graphic Representations, Russian Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 56 (14), 2183 - 2200, 2011 (In English), DOI: 10.1134/S0036023611140038

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2012

Extended Periodic Table - Alternative

From Rasko Jovanovic's World of Mathematics, an Extended Periodic Table - Alternative:

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2012

Rihani's 120 Element Periodic Table Formulations

Jeries Rihani writes: "Assuming the periodic table may reach an end at atomic number 120, I wish to draw your attention to the following three variations for the periodic table that I have on my web site Symmetry Of The Periodic Table which I think might be of interest, here, here & here":

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2012

Compact Mendeleev-Moseley-Seaborg Periodic Table (CMMSPT)

A Compact Mendeleev-Moseley-Seaborg Periodic Table (CMMSPT).

This table can be found by two different ways:

  • Via MMSPT - All terms of the MMSPT are shifted to the right side without spaces.
  • Via Janet Periodic Table - The first row of the Janet PT is deleted. - We remove 2 from all others 118 terms.

These 2 transformations lead to the same table, with 7 rows and 32 columns. Blocks p (green), d (light grey), and f (light orange) are preserved.

The 14 terms of the s block (dark orange/red) are splited in "cascads".

This table can be seen in the A173592 sequence in the On-line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (OEIS). Row differences are 8, 8, 18, 18, 32, 32.

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2012

Srivaths–Labarca Periodic Table

This is an improved version of the Zigzag Periodic Table (2012). In this new arrangement the main criteria proposed to settle the placement of the elements hydrogen and helium has been taken into account: electronic configurations, the number of electrons needed to fill the outer-shell, chemical behavior, and triads of atomic number.

This is a new categorial criterion recently proposed by Eric Scerri, according to which hydrogen and helium form part of the triads H(1), F(9), Cl(17) and He(2), Ne(10), Ar(18), respectively. Thus, hydrogen preserves its place between alkali metals and halogen while helium is now in between noble gases and alkaline earth elements.

This periodic table allows visualizing easily the relationships of hydrogen and of helium with the different criteria, avoiding drawing lines to see them in contrast to other similar periodic systems.

Akash Srivaths, Chennai, India
Martín Labarca, CONICET & National University of Quilmes, Argentina

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2012

3D Illustrated Alexander Arrangement of Elements

The design of the 2012 Alexander Arrangement of Elements (AAE) follows the principles of a three-dimensional model developed by Roy Alexander in 1965: a printed representation of element information based on strict adherence to the Periodic Law, with every element data box physically and visually contiguous and continuous within the sequence of atomic numbers in generally accepted element property related columns - "...the periodic table the way it's supposed to be".

This is made possible by wrapping, folding, and joining the printed material and employing the patented p-block downslant of the element data boxes to allow the end element of a period to be adjacent to the first element of the next period.

Several unique features separate it from the previous four versions of the AAE

  • The visual effect mirrors the look of Theodore Gray's series of posters, books, element cards and periodictable.com website and apps for the Apple iPod and iPad.
  • Each element box is dominated by a Theodore Gray element photograph, with the element name, letter symbol, and atomic number relatively large, often overlapping the photo.
  • The period numbers (below, right) are printed at the interface of the end/beginning of the periods, folded 90 degrees on the model, and the blocks and columns (old & new numbers), are identified below the data boxes - and in the case of the Actinoids, above.

  • The element blocks connect at a central nexus (below, center), with the d- and f-blocks leaving, looping, and returning there, thus allowing the shorter period gaps above to be closed. For best visibility of the element data, these loops pinch together near the intersection. The p-block bends in a half-circle to join the s-block at the corner described above, with a patented 'downslant' where the element boxes gracefully sweep down a full box height (above) within this block to allow elimination of the "carriage return" effect: each period ending on the row above the next.

  • The extended Hydrogen data box, a characteristic of all Alexander Arrangements, is more extended in this model, reaching for the multiple positions of the H box that are still under discussion among experts. The extra-extended Hydrogen box, illustrated by a composite image of a hydrogen cloud in space, (above, right) loops over the s- and p-blocks. Starting up from behind the corner of Helium & Lithium, inside the half-helical tube to loop over Helium, attach above Lithium, Beryllium and then Carbon as the loop descends (joining the ascending portion) over the data boxes of the s- & p-blocks, terminating in contact with Fluorine, Neon, and corner-on to Neon.
  • The model size is the same as the previous Display Version of the AAE, but has fewer element data boxes, due to there being no photos of the lab created elements and for simplification of the educational application - introduction to property periodicity and organization of element data - the elements with atomic numbers over 94 are not included (see addendum).
  • Where the f-block begins and ends, between Barium and Lutetium, the f-block is held perpendicular to the only flat segment of the element display by a pair of triangular braces, which also create the flat area, aligning the s-block with the 'pinch' of the d-block. This is particularly apparent from the bottom, when the model is supported from above. (see below)

Designed by Roy Alexander, a science museum exhibit and teaching aid designer, the Adobe Illustrator art for the model was started by Ann Grafelman, and continued by Roy from mid 2011 through November of 2012.

Photos were provided by Theodore Gray, and Element Collection funded the printing and die cutting performed by Strine Printing in York, Pennsylvania. The model kit was first offered at Theo's PeriodicTable.com, then at Roy's AllPeriodicTables.com and the new 3dPeriodicTable.com, which site is dedicated to the 3D Forever Periodic Table only, with add-ons, application suggestions, and descriptions and commentary of all sorts.

Assembly instructions and step photos, as well as a number or completed model color photographs are included with the kit. These were developed with prototype models, and while functional, have been upgraded and accompanied by an assembly video at AlexanderArrangementOfElements.com/3D

Addendum:

Text relating to the abbreviation of the ever increasing number of elements is explained at two places on the 3D AAE illustrated periodic table model kit. One will remain with the model and one is removed at the time of assembly.

That which remains runs under the Actinoids and the d-block elements, where the lab created elements might ordinarily be expected to be found, says:

The lab created elements ordinarily found in this part of a periodic table are not to be found in nature, there can be no photographs of them, so nothing needs to be added to this element photo periodic table - ever - so it will never be obsolete, a Forever Periodic Table.

That which is removed says:

Naturally-occurring elements have been numbered variously, generally between 80 and 96, all for cogent scientific reasons.

For easier teaching and learning, we have included on this periodic table only the 92 elements actually currently existing on Earth and in the remainder of the Universe, and adding Technetium and Promethium, which, although they may have no stable forms, serve to fill what would otherwise be gaps in the sequence.

Not added for practical and educational reasons are 'elements' consisting only of pages and pages of computer data from smashing atoms in particle accelerators. Another reason is that there can be no photographs of them to show, and as a result, your arrangement is complete and never be obsolete - your Forever Periodic Table.

Included with the art of the periodic table on the die cut substrate that makes up the model is some background information about the the history of three dimensional periodic tables.

The first of these is about the discoverer of the concept of arranging the elements in periods suggested by the properties of the elements, de Chancourtois.

The second 3D periodic table information piece (on the rear of the de Chancourtois removable card) are sketches of a number of the 3D periodic tables found on the Chemogenesis website.

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2012

Vortic Periodic Table in Marquetry

From Dr David Robson:

"My vortic periodic table created in marquetry may be of interest. I have always thought of vortic energies and with retirement time, I used my Marquetry Hobby to so create. Despite the inevitable Black Hole centre I have included the Higgs Boson there as a tribute to its discovery and potential as a window to elsewhere."

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2012

Makeyev's Verticle Form Periodic Table

A new version of the periodic table of elements on the vertical table form. Alexander K. Makeyev, a member of the Moscow Society of Naturalists, section of planetonautics; freelance interdisciplinary researcher and inventor, knowall@list.ru.

1. Makeyev A.K. Normal and pathological anatomy and physiology of the human person and society. Fundamental knowledge about the qualities of the human person, human society and the software company, produces and acts of people, based on the universal algorithm of holographic structure and function at all levels and forms of matter. / / Scientific and Technical Library. July 25, 2012. 364 p, here

2. Makeyev A.K. Particles of electrostatic and magnetic fields in the system of matter photons move faster than a photon moves himself. / / The scientific debate: Proceedings IV International Correspondence scientific conference. Part I. (20 August 2012) - Moscow:. "International Centre for Science and Education", 2012. 142., S. 47-65. ISBN 978-5-905945-37-3 UDC 08. BBK 94. H 34, here:

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2012

Wheelshaped Table of Elements

From Facebook, a Wheelshaped table of elements.

Please note the symmetry of this representation.

As a result, it is possible that element 118 is the very last one in the periodic table. We have the sequence:

2 x 14 (blue)
4 x 10 (brown)
6 x 6 (violet)
8 x 2 (green)

and, logically, neither first nor last factor can be 0 or -2 (they differ in two columns above respectively by 2 and 4). On the other hand, the coherence of the structure requires the existence of two additional elements at the beginning!

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2012

Bettermann Periodic Table

In the course of my enquiries regarding the peridoc table of the elements your comprehensive and interesting collection of the varying configuration of the elements caught my eye. Responding to a growing interest, I worked through all models but couldn't find any configuration which agrees with mine.

Find my configuration for the elements in the figure below. Please open the attachment in which you find an explanatory statement for the illustrated principle, pdf file here. It bases upon the Moseleysches diagrams and the work of Eugenie Lisitzin from the thirties of the last century.

Heiner Bettermann

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2012

Piazzalunga's Pyramidal Periodic Table Formulations

Three Pyramidal Periodic Table Formulations, and a Spiral, from Marco Piazzalunga:

 

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2013

Twin Spiral Pi Trinomial - Based Periodic Table

A Twin Spiral Pi Trinomial - Based Periodic Table by Bill Harrington, Founder/CTO of Rainforest Reactor Research and Temporal Dynamics Laboratory. For full size, click the image:

 

 

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2013

Macro-Valence Cells vs Jovian Image and Red Spot Location Periodic Table

A Macro-Valence Cells vs Jovian Image and Red Spot Location Periodic Table by Bill Harrington, Founder/CTO of Rainforest Reactor Research and Temporal Dynamics Laboratory. For full size, click the image:

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2013

Fattah's Periodic Table

A new vertical periodic table by Dr. Khalid A. FATTAH, Faculty of Eng., Karary University, Khartoum, Sudan. For full size, click the image:

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2013

7 Elemental Chemical Synthesis

The Mystics Guide to Elemental Chemistry, by bzylman at deviantart:

[A] poster is designed to geek out the chemist and the mystic alike. It is a variation on the periodic table of chemical elements that have been rearranged into a circular structure based upon their proton count and chemical family, augmented with the concept of the 7 mystic elements of earth, air, fire, water, metal, wood and void. It was very interesting to work upon once I hit the correct organization of elements that they lined up almost perfectly.

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2013

Electronegativity Chart (Leach)

From Mark R Leach's paper, Concerning electronegativity as a basic elemental property and why the periodic table is usually represented in its medium form, Journal & PDF.

Due to the importance of Pauling's electronegativity scale, as published in The Nature of The Chemical Bond (1960), where electronegativity ranges from Cs 0.7 to F 4.0, all the other electronegativity scales are routinely normalised with respect to Pauling's range.

When the Pauling, Revised Pauling, Mulliken, Sanderson and Allred-Rochow electronegativity scales are plotted together against atomic number, Z, the similarity of the data can be observed. The solid line shows the averaged data:

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2013

MCAS Electron Orbital Filling

From Joel M Williams:

"While the periodic table arrangement is usefully interpreted in columns of similar behavior, it is erroneous to imply that the underlying orbitals are all the same for all the elements in the columns of a block. Sub-orbital information has been excluded! From the standpoint of chemistry, the rule of eight would have provided better imagery on which to build an orbital system than was Bohr's orb turned-sphere. A sphere is useless from a chemical standpoint. Hybridization should not have to occur to explain the simplest of molecules. Simplicity would have the electrons occupying orbital spaces that are similar in shape. Only three orbital types are actually needed to describe the electron packing of the elements. Octahedral, square-planar, and pyramidal coordination complexes of the transition elements follow logically without the need to hybridize. This brief paper describes a rational packing of electrons around a nucleus that ends up mimicking the familiar periodic table when compressed to similar behavior."

 

Modeling the MCAS Way describes this concept of "building blocks" and can be found here.

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2013

Higgs Boson and Fundamental Particle/Force Periodic Tables

The Higgs boson sits at the heart of the Standard Model of particle physics, and so is at the centre of periodic table type representations of quarks, leptons and forces.

Three representations by the UCR Today, a video interview with Particle Fever editor Walter Murch: "The Higgs boson is kind of a MacGuffin" and from im9.eu:

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2013

Fattah's Extended Periodic Table

A new vertical periodic table (Extended) by Dr. Khalid A. FATTAH, Faculty of Eng., Karary University, Khartoum, Sudan:

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2013

Proton Configuration Periodic Table

A Periodic Table of Proton Configurations by Radoslav Rasko Jovanovic:

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2013

4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table

By Jgmoxness

"I've replaced the standard periodic table in the 7th "Chemistry Pane" of my E8 visualizer with a 2D/3D/4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri version of the Periodic Table."

"Interestingly, it has 120 elements, which is the number of vertices in the 600 Cell or the positive half of the 240 E8 roots. It is integrated into VisibLie_E8 so clicking on an element adds that particular atomic number's E8 group vertex number to the 3rd E8 visualizer pane. The code is a revision and extension of Enrique Zeleny's Wolfram Demonstration":

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2013

Shapes Periodic Table

By ScienceIsGolden.com comes the Periodic Table of Shapes. The site is worth clicking around, as there is a lot of good PT stuff to find:

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2013

3D Left Step Periodic Table

By Masahiko Suenaga, Kyushu University, Japan a 3D Left Step Periodic Table.

"Inspired by the work of Dr. Tsimmerman and Dr. Samanez, I have created a new 3D Left Step Periodic Table, which resembles to Mt. Fuji, recently registered as a World Heritage site. For more information, please visit my website":

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2013

From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement

A paper in J.Chem. Ed.: From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement

Emili Besalú, Departament de Química i Institut de Química Computacional i Catàlisis, Universitat de Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69, 17071 Girona, Catalonia, Spain.

J. Chem. Educ., 2013, 90 (8), pp 1009–1013 DOI: 10.1021/ed3004534 Publication Date (Web)

"A periodic table is constructed from the consideration of periodic properties and the application of the principal components analysis technique. This procedure is useful for objects classification and data reduction and has been used in the field of chemistry for many applications, such as lanthanides, molecules, or conformers classification. From the information given, the whole procedure can be reproduced by any interested reader having a basic background in statistics and with the help of the supplementary material provided. Intermediate calculations are instructive because they quantify several concepts the students know only at a qualitative level. The final scores representation reveals an unexpected periodic table presenting some interesting features and points for discussion."

<From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement>

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2013

Periodic Pyramid

A Periodic Pyramid by Jennifer N. Hennigan and W. Tandy Grubbs * Department of Chemistry, Stetson University, DeLand, Florida 32723, United States

J. Chem. Educ., 2013, 90 (8), pp 1003–1008 DOI: 10.1021/ed3007567 Publication Date (Web): June 21, 2013

The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy the shells identified by the principle quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The numbers 2, 8, 18, and 32 are shown in this work to be related to the triangular numbers from mathematical number theory. The relationship to the triangular numbers, in turn, suggests an alternate method for arranging elements in terms of periodicity. The resulting three-dimensional "periodic pyramid" is highly symmetric in shape. Just as is true in the modern periodic table, each layer of the periodic pyramid can be separated into shell and subshell contributions. Examining the pyramid's structure is arguably a pedagogically useful activity for college-level introductory or physical chemistry students, as it provides an opportunity to further ponder the shell model of the atom and the origins of periodicity. The connections to number theory are used to show that the outermost subshell of a given shell contains (2n – 1) orbitals.

<Periodic Pyramid>

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Bernard Periodic Spiral

The Bernard Periodic Spiral of the Elements (BPSE), depicts a novel rendition of the Periodic Table that replaces the flat rectangular format with a continuous unidirectional spiral that maintains all the properties of Group and Period formation.

Comparisons may be made with similar models spanning the last three decades of the 20th century (Alexander, 1971; Mazurs, 1974; & Kaufman, 1999).

In the chart form, this new rendition is referred to as the Elliptical Periodic Chart of the Elements. In the three-dimensional form, the model resembles a Christmas tree in shape with the 7 Periods represented as circular platforms situated at various levels with the elements placed appropriately at the outer edges of each of these platforms as a Period builds up. The elements may be represented as spherical objects or flat discs with radii proportionate to atomic radii (or reasonable approximations). Color schemes accentuate the four different Blocks of elements: the s-Block (green), the p-Block (blue, with the exception that the last Group is red signifying the end of a Period), d-Block (orange), and the f-Block (yellow). The grey section, called the Group-Period Interchange, is where the end of a particular Period connects to the beginning of the next Period, and, at the same time, transitions from Group 18 to Group 1.

Watch the video here:

<Bernard Periodic Spiral>

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Underground Map of the Elements

By Dr Mark Lorch of the University of Hull, an Underground Map of the Elements.

From here: "My son loves trains. So I came up with a train related twist to an inspection of the periodic table. We sat and cut up a copy of the table and then rearranged each element as a 'station' on an underground rail system. Each line represents a characteristic shared by the elements on that line":

Underground Map of the Elements

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Matrix Series Periodic Table

By Richard Kingstone, a Matrix Series Periodic Table. Read more here.

The Janet Periodic Table (aka Left Step Table) may be re-arranged as a series of square matrices. Each element is represented as a cell and is identified by the atomic number (Z), shown as the upper number of each cell.

The quantum numbers (n, l, mL, mS) determine the location of an element within the table. The quantum pair (n, l ) are the lower numbers in each cell. Four matrices are required, each matrix is identified by a ãmatrix numberä (a) as shown below;:

Matrix Periodic Table

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2013

Music Notes of Periodic Table

By Claude Bayeh, a Musical Notes formulation:

Music Notes of Periodic Table

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2013

Averaged Ionisation Potential Periodic Table

By Leland Allen, a representation of the periodic table with the third dimension of energy derived from the averaged ionisation potentials of the s and p electrons. (Allen suggested that this was a direct measure of electronegativity). From J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1989, 111, 9004:

Averaged Ionisation Potential

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2013

Model Wooden Periodic Table

From here, and translated from Spanish:

Among the events commemorating the 75th anniversary of the creation of the School of Treball, the author of this site, B. Navarro, along with J. Semis and J. Gràcia have built a model wooden periodic table.

The table has been divided into 5 areas: representative elements, noble gases, transition elements, rare earths and finally the groups I and II of alkali and alkaline earth together. Each of these areas of the table is made with a different type of wood. The block transition elements is made with oak, ash noble gases, representative elements in cherry, sapele the rare earth and alkali/alcalinoterros beechwood.

The central idea of the model is that each element is represented by a cube of 3 cm edge so that you can see on all sides, from left to right or right to left without losing the order of increasing atomic number or the relative position of the elements:

Wooden Periodic TableWooden Periodic Table

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2013

Muradjan's Mathematical Structure of The Periodic Table

From the website periodictablemathstructure:

Abstract:

The Periodic Table with a new double numerical structure, presented here is attempt to find table form which will in some new way represent the periodicity and symmetry of the Elements, with the Periodic System as base. Also this tetrahedral laminar table structure maybe will became a base for developing a new shell structure of atomic nucleus. This new rearrangement of the chemical element is based on mathematical formula which result is simple, length of the periods:

Math Periodic Table

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2013

Atomic Periodic Town

Three related formulations by Baha Tangour (Tangour Bahoueddine), the Atomic Town and two Boomerang periodic tables.

Baha says: "The propositions are different representation of a 3D dimensions that depend on three properties (spectral term multiplicity, lone-pairs and period number)":

Kabbalistic

 

Kabbalistic

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2013

Ye Olde Periodic Table

From the Serious Severity blog, a spoof of this formulation:

ye olde periodic table

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2014

Lado's Periodic Table Series Analysis

By Solomon F Lado, a mathematical analysis.

Abstract (full paper):

"There is a periodic table, at least in terms of atomic number and electronic configuration, for every positive integer, c >= 2, with a capacity of 20c2 – 21c + 1 elements, where c is the construction index, and c equals one plus the maximum number of electrons per orbital of an atom. The c-construction index and the c-construction-index formulae are unique to this report. The maximum number of potential orbitals per sub-shell of an atom = 3n-1 where n is the index of the s, p, d, and f sub-shells":

Lado

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2014

Jodogne's Janet New Color Periodic Table

By J.C. Jodogne, "a Janet type slightly modified to enhance shells, periods and to make determination of ground state configuration (orbitals) very easily to build". Click here to get the full size pdf.

Janet New Color PT

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2014

Jodogne's New Color Table

By J.C. Jodogne, "a medium type with the above features but with Z continuity and a general aspect very similar to the usual presentation". Click here to get the full size pdf.

New Color PT

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2014

ADOMAH Periodic Table Glass Cube

Valery Tsimmerman, of the ADOMAH Periodic Table and the ADOMAH Tetrahedron, has now used these ideas to produce a beautiful glass cube:

 

This amazing object is available for sale from Grand Illusions:

 

A Note by Philip Stewart stewart.phi@gmail.com

The cube represents 120 chemical elements etched into a cube of Optical Crystal glass. The s, p, d, and f blocks of the Janet periodic table form four rectangles, which are slices of a regular tetrahedron, parallel with two of its edges and with two faces of the circumscribed cube. All four quantum numbers are made visible in this arrangement. You can see a 2-D version on the Perfect Periodic Table website, click on the "skyscraper" version on the right to see the tetrahedron, and go to Regular Tetrahedron at foot of page for details.

The regular tetrahedron is the only form in which slices are rectangles of different shape and identical perimeter. When each orbital is represented by a square of unit edge, the rectangles representing the blocks all have the same perimeter, which is twice the length of the edges of the tetrahedron (which are of course √2 times the edges of the cube): 18 units = 2(values of n + values of ml).

Block
values of
n
values of
ml
s
8
1
p
6
3
d
4
5
f
2
7

Valery Tsimmerman, orahct@gmail.com, creator of the design, has written to me as follows:

"I just had some thoughts about the Perimeter Rule that is at the basis of the tetrahedral arrangement. Dimensions of the blocks are dictated by number of values of ml and number of values of n. We know that n governs quantization of energy. Recently I learned that quantization of the possible orientations of L with respect to an external magnetic field is often referred to as space quantization. (Serway, Jewett: Physics for Scientists and Engineers. 6th edition. p.1369).

"That is, ml stands for space quantization. Therefore, the Perimeter Rule reflects a direct relationship between energy and space. I think that this could have some significance. The beautiful thing about the Universe is that each type of symmetry is related to some conservation law. Symmetry in time is related to energy. Therefore, n is related to time also, so, in the Perimeter Rule we have relationship between time and space on quantum numerical level. The interesting thing is that ml can be positive and negative, while n can only be positive. Similarly, things can move in space in positive and negative directions, but time has only one direction. There is no negative time, just as there are no negative values of quantum number n."

Adomah is a variant of Adamah, Hebrew for 'dust of the earth', from which Adam was made (Genesis 2:7).

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2014

Gutierrez Samanez's Binodic Form of the Periodic Table (Video)

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2014

Cross Periodic Table

By Claude Ziad Bayeh, a Cross Periodic Table:

Cross Periodic Table

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2014

Zambon's Periodic Table Based on Triads

Alfio Zambon – Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia

1. Introduction

In the last decades, the notion of triad has been recovered by Eric Scerri, who suggested it as a possible categorical criterion to represent chemical periodicity. In particular, he reformulates the notion of triad in terms of atomic number instead of atomic weights and, in this way, the value of the intermediate term of the triad is the exact average of the values of the two extremes. The author notes that the attempt of finding new triads is very important since this relation is based exclusively on the atomic number, that is, the only feature of the elements considered as basic substances. In this work, I will follow Scerri's general proposal.

Read the full paper here (pdf):

Words Periodic Table

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2014

Eadie's Periodic Electron Configuration

By Gerald Eadie, a Periodic Electronic Configuration:

Periodic Electron Configuration

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2014

Chandra's Polar Plot Periodic Table

MONOGRAPH ON ATOMS, BY Dr. N. Naveen Chandra, 543 Bellamy Road North Scarborough, On, M1H1G5, 416 439 6630, chandraalex@hotmail.com © N.Naveen Chandra, 2014.

Abstract

A new way of graphical representation of atoms is developed and presented here. Atoms are recognized as functions of two variables A(r,Θ), where r =2,10,18,36,54,86,118 (given arbitrarily r=1,2,3,4,5,6,7) represents period and Θ representing group, is actually the angle between the groups. A mathematical solution is obtained for Θ having three distinct values of (π /9) radians, (π/18) radians and (π/27) radians which define three super groups satisfying the equation 15(π/27) +10(π/18) +8 (π /9) =2π. 15 groups of two Atoms with a transition zone of (π/27) radians is nominally called Grey Super Group (GSG). 10 groups of which 9 have four Atoms and 1 has two Atoms, also including a transition zone of (π/18) radians, is nominally called Blue Super Group (BSG). 8 groups of which 7 have 6 Atoms and one has 7 Atoms, including a transition zone of (π/9) radians is called Yellow Super Group (YSG). The group with 7 atoms is the so called reference group of Atoms 2, 10, 18,36,54,86 and 118. The GSG has 30 Atoms, the BSG has 38 Atoms and the YSG has 49 Atoms. The Atom 1 is at the centre of the Hub and does not belong to any group or period and has coordinates of (0, 0). Atom 1 having no neutrons is unique.

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2014

Metallic Character Table

"I would like to submit you an hexagonal periodic table. It's structured in different rings. The elements are ordered on their metallic characters so in the inner rings there are noble gases and nonmetals while in the outer rings there are alkali and alkaline earth metals. I based the order on the typical metallic characteristics: low ionization energy, electron affinity, etc... "

Marco Piazzalunga <marco.piazzalunga@live.com>

Metallic Characters

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2014

Janet Rajeuni

By Philip Stewart:

Janet Rejuvenated, with acknowledgement to Marurs and to Valery Tsimmerman for the idea of using one square per orbital and of shifting the blocks so that each row represents one value of n, the principal quantum number.

The main objection people make to Janet is that He is placed at the head of the alkaline earth metals although it behaves as a noble gas. The essential answer is that electronic structure explains behaviour and not vice versa; like Ne (and unlike Ar, Kr, Xe and Rn), He has a complete shell. Similarly H, like C, is half way between a full and an empty shell, unlike the alkali metals and the halogens. I suggest a new argument: nobody finds it strange that the p block has a row of non-metals at its head (and that half its members are non-metals), so why not the s block?

Janet Rajeuni

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2014

UVS Periodic Tables

From the Universal Vortical Singularity (UVS) website, two related formunations from the nucleosynthesis in the universe section, one showing a "manifold dual-core 3-sphere hypersphere topology", and the other showing a "dual-core Möbius strip topology":

UVS manifold dual-core 3-sphere hypersphere topology

UVS dual-core Möbius strip topology

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2014

Clock Periodic Table

Prof. Martyn Poliakoff of the University of Notting, and star of the Periodic Videos YouTube Channel, explains how he was given a periodic table clock by a Japanese School teacher... which he likes very much:

Clock PT

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2014

Belikov's Modular Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

"I call this version of the Modular Periodic Table of Chemical Elements. I got the idea for it some time between 2005 and 2007, during the chemistry course at my university, in attempt to rationalize the clumsy common version I was being taught. I showed it to my chemistry teacher, but he didn't seem to be impressed much, so it went into the drawer. Recently I decided to resurrect it and publish somewhere. So I had a look on the web and found your excellent database, with hundreds of versions. After the first shock, I realized that only few are actually similar to my version. These are well known Janet's table and ADOMAH table. So, it appeared to me that the idea to group elements strictly according to filling of their atomic shells is not new. However, the way I have done it is slightly different from the mentioned tables. For example, s,p,d and f blocks of elements are completely autonomous and can be placed wherever desired (hence the name 'Modular'). This reflects the notion that there is little in common in chemical behavior between the elements in different blocks. Also, outer subshell type, energy level and electron count are clearly labeled, so that these parameters can be quickly determined for each element.

"Overall, I think that this version of periodic table allows easier understanding and transition from IUPAC table and could be implemented in school and university textbooks."

Aleksey Belikov

Belikov

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2014

Jodogne's Janet New Colour Periodic Table

"This Periodic Table(click here for larger version) incorporates the Real Aufbau of Professor Pyykkö based on relativistic Quantum Mechanics, with Z continuity horizontally and vertically, by means of taking into account the ground level - energy increase upward - of the last incoming electron (the lower side of the element case is the level guide mark). A large yellow line indicates period. A gradual color for H induces a manifold chemical behavior."

J.C.Jodogne

Janet New Colour

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2014

Aco Muradjan's New Notation Scheme

Aco writes:

On 08.11.2014 I added an article to the General Science Journal:

"Necessity of urgent revising and changing the present IUPAC notation scheme in the Periodic Table"

The current and present modern notation scheme for the groups in the Periodic Table exist from 1985, proposed from the IUPAC Commission on the Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, as recommendation. This proposal was also verified in 2005.

Because the IUPAC Commission encourages further discussions, improvements and proposals on this subject I made this new article which article investigates the possibilities for the new notation scheme in the Periodic Table. Links:

http://gsjournal.net/Science-Journals/Research%20Papers-Quantum%20Theory%20/%20Particle%20Physics/Download/5755

http://gsjournal.net/Science-Journals/Essays/View/5755

This article has picture of the Periodic Table with new notation scheme:

Aco Muradjan's New Notation Scheme

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2014

Arrangement of Elements 7th Order & Element Sequences

An exploration of some mathematics underlying the periodic table, read the PDF here, by Olivier Joseph.

Oliver says:

"May I propose you the following pattern, as the result of a personal study concerning the arrangement of the Elements, including sequences. Based on some hypothesis and as depicted in the enclosed illustrations, the elements are positioned according to a spiral function of atomic number and atomic mass, representation in 2D in a spiral form pattern, or in 3D conical helix model.

"The elements are numbered and placed consecutively along this spiral according to a specific angle, appropriately established between each element, forming a seven arm spiral pattern. With such an angle, specifically defined, a link is established between the various elements of a same group (corresponding to chemical elements with similar properties) and different layers. These latter becoming distributed among each arm of the spiral in a notable arranged way."

Arrangement of Elements 7th Order & Element Sequences

Arrangement of Elements 7th Order & Element Sequences

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2014

Schaeffer's IUPAC Periodic Table Quantum Mechanics Consistent

IUPAC Periodic Table Quantum Mechanics Consistent, Bernard Schaeffer, Journal of Modern Physics, Vol. 5, No. 3, February 24, 2014
DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2014.53020

Abstract: Most periodic tables of the chemical elements are between 96% and 100% in accord with quantum mechanics. Three elements only do not fit correctly into the official tables, in disagreement with the spherical harmonics and the Pauli exclusion principle. Helium, belonging to the s-block, should be placed beside hydrogen in the s-block instead of the p-block. Lutetium and lawrencium belonging to the d-block of the transition metals should not be in the f-block of the lanthanides or the actinoids. With these slight modifications, the IUPAC table becomes quantum mechanics consistent.

IUPAC Periodic Table Quantum Mechanics Consistent

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2015

UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology

This configuration can topologically suggest the g-block cycle in the 8th period for extended periodic table.

In the Klein bottle topology as illustrated, it is plausible that after the s-block cycle in the 8th periodical cycle, the topological path continues to spiral around the outer f-block cycle to harmonically form 14 elements.

And then subjected to the spiral Möbius strip topological twist, it could resonate to form 4 more elements in the anti-cyclonic path around 17th, 18th, 1st, and 2nd angular phases of the anti-cyclonic core; this would render the 18 elemental positions for the hypothetical g-block cycle in the entire half-integral anti-cyclonic cycle of the Klein bottle topology.

Hypothetically, the topological path then moves into the cyclonic cycle, and harmonically forms its d-block and p-block cycles with 16 elemental positions to complete the 8th periodical cycle with a total of 36 elements.

UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology

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2015

Quantum Fold Periodic Table

A Multi-Form Periodic Table, by keytochemistry.com, with a visual key to electronic configurations:

Quantum Fold Periodic Table

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2015

ADOMAH Periodic Table and Normal Distribution

Valery Tsimmerman writes:

The ADOMAH, from here, resembles the normal distribution or "Bell Curve". It also mimics the distribution of electrons in orbitals:

ADOMAH Periodic Table and Normal Distribution

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2015

Pams Quantum Periodic Table

By Dr. N. D. Raju, the Pams Quantum Periodic Table. Read the full paper discussing the logic of the new formulation.

ADOMAH Periodic Table and Normal Distribution

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2015

Heart Periodic Table

A Heart Periodic Table by Claude Bayeh:

Heart Periodic Table

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2016

Valentine Periodic Table

A Valentine Periodic Table by Claude Bayeh:

Valentine Periodic Table by Claude Bayeh

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2016

NAWA's byobu-Janet Periodic Table

NAWA, Nagayasu: A Japanese schoolteacher and periodic table designer presents a Janet form periodic table in the traditional Japanese "byobu" style:

NAWA's byobu-Janet Periodic Table

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2016

Advanced Spiral Periodic Classification of the Elements

By Imran Ali, Mohd. Suhail and Al Arsh Basheer an Advanced spiral periodic classification of the elements. Read the paper here.

Advanced Spiral Periodic Table

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2016

Triadic Networks

From orijikan.com: a great summary paper by Dr. Eric Scerri on the role of triads in evolution of the periodic table and a paper by Dr. Alfio Zambon inspired this work. Here is my contribution: the Triadic Networks (TN), which is a general mathematical design, and the Triadic Elemental Networks (TEN), that apply that design to chemical elements. For a full discussion, read the pdf here.

triad networks

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2016

Clock Face Periodic Table

In 2014 Prof. Martyn Poliakoff – of YouTube fame – showed us a working Periodic Table clock, here.

The designer of the clock, Nagayasu (a Japannese school teacher), has now provided a fuller periodic table based on the same design:

clock

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2016

Sensu or Fan Periodic Table

By NAWA, Nagayasu – A Japanese schoolteacher and periodic table designer – a "Sensu" or fan periodic table:

Sensu or fan

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2016

KAS Periodic Table

The KAS periodic table reproduces and depicts the nuclear properties of chemical elements. This periodic table depicts not only the trends of nuclear properties, but also reproduces their numerical values that remain very close to the experimental values (difference less than 4%).

The Segre Chart is based on the number of protons, Z, and the number of neutrons, N. It is like a library of nuclei and shows the recorded data only. The Segre Chart can not work when the number of neutrons is not given. But KAS Periodic Table works when the number of neutrons is not given.It does not require the number of neutrons to produce the results.This is a simple chart based on the number of protons of chemical element. We identify the following properties of elements:-

  • Location that remains near the Neutron Dripline of element.
  • Location that remains very close to stable or long-lived isotopes of the element. Location that remains near the Proton Dripline of element.
  • In the case of superheavy  elements, we identify which Compound Nuclei are involved in the Hot Fusion reaction and which Compound Nuclei are involved in the Cold Fusion reaction.
  • We see the r-process path and assess the r-process abundance.
  • The pattern of abundance of chemical elements.
  • We identify which elements are the product of exothermal fusion.
  • We identify the location of isotope on the basis of two-neutron separation energy.
  • Nuclear binding energy trend. Beta decay trend.
  • We see the Straight Line of Nuclear Stability.
  • Empirical Law discovered.
  • Periodicity in the nuclear properties.
  • We can compare the nuclear properties of an element with the nuclear properties of almost all the chemical elements.

Read more here, here and here.

KAS Periodic Table

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2016

Harrington Periodic Tables

So we start this effort tabula rasa (without preconceived ideas).

1) All atoms have a default "common denominator" structure at 270 mass units, irrespective of the element under discussion. Therefore, no elements seen as wisps and glints past this point are of consequence. Ergo, the bizarre stability of Dubnium 270.

2) This common structure is divided up by the exact same divisors as are the electron orbitals - i.e. the prime numbers of 2, 3, 5, and 7.

3) Pi as a divisor produces its own, unique and dominating organizational patterns.

4) Each of these sets of plotted nuclide "boxes" use identical formats, but are arranged in vertical columns based on the set of 270 AMUs being divided by these prime numbers. So the 5D Table is 270/5 or 54 AMUs per vertical column/"tower".

5) Each system reinforces unique elemental parameters. The system based on 3/Pi, and its second "harmonic" at 6/2Pi reflects physical properties. The 2Pi configuration almost exactly emulates the "conventional" / Mendeleevian element-based table, except the periods are based upon mass not element count, and these periods do not organize in rows of 18 elements, but rather rows of 44 mass units. The organization/configuration of this default structure is: Pi(Pi^2 + Pi + 1) = 44 This is the primary physical default structure of the periodic table and spectrum of elements, as projected in 3D space, and as perceptible to humans.

6) 5D determines everything with magnetic properties. This disproves every single theory that attributes electron shell behavior as determining magnetic parameters. Clearly here we see that the nucleus is "calling the shots", with electron orbitals conforming as driven. The various red and blue shaded boxes are found at extremes of top and bottom.

7) The system of 7D determines most of all physical parameters of surface and molecular behavior. Here we see surface tension, density, softness and hardness, malleability, boiling and melting points and a few other behaviors. This system of correlation is fully unknown to conventional theory. Notice how superlative parameters bunch at the top and bottom of this configuration.

8) When this system of 270 mass units is divided by 12, for 22 mass units per period, the periodic cycle rate precisely correlates with known Type 1 and 2 elemental superconductors. The physical correlations between periodic repetition at 22 mass units, the 270 count system, and superconductors is also completely novel and not compatible to conventional BCS theory. The correlation between this 22 count system and the three largest cross section nuclides known to man (113Cd, 157Gd and 135Xe) is also completely heretical, however mathematically symmetrical and perfect it may actually be organized.

9) The center portion of this common 270 count structure is named the "Cordillera", for the habit of multiple parallel mountain ridges sharing a common alignment. This area is profoundly affected by Pi-based organizations. The very center at 135Xe indicates that the overall table should terminate at element 108 Hassium at 270 mass units. This has a Proton/Neutron ratio of 3:2. This actual nuclide has very poor stability, unlike Dubnium 105 with 270 mass counts. This nuclide has a ratio of precisely 1:Pi/2, indicating the entire table describes a spectrum of mass organizational states spanning the integer ratio of 1:1 (Deuterium) to 3:2, then on through to 1:Pi/2. Current accepted atomic theories concerning "Islands of Stability" are ridiculous.

WAH

Click on the image to see the full size version

KAS Periodic Table

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2016

Lindsay's Periodic Table

From Geoffrey Lindsay:

"I put together a table of elements that may be useful for teaching 101 chem from the point of view of valence electrons and the energy sublevels of the valence orbitals".

Click here to see the full size version.

Lindsay's Periodic Table

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2016

Complete Periodic Table Chemistry Clock: H to Og

From MrEorganization: "I've created a new periodic table clock for my son, a chemistry undergrad at Whitman College, a holiday present and a celebration of the official new names."

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2016

Instructables 3D Periodic Table

From Makendo on the Instructables website:

The first periodic table was developed in 1862 by a French geologist called Alexandre-Émile Béguyer de Chancourtois. He plotted the elements on a cylinder with a circumference of 16 units, and noted the resulting helix placed elements with similar properties in line with each other. But his idea - which he called the "Telluric Spiral" (see here), because the element tellurium was near the middle - never caught on, perhaps because it was published in a geology journal unread by chemists, and because de Chancourtois failed to include the diagram and described the helix as a square circle triangle.

Mendeleev got all the glory, and it is his 1869 version (dramatically updated, but still recognizable) that nearly everyone uses today.

This instructable [project] documents my efforts to reimagine a 3D periodic table of the elements, using modern making methods. It's based on the structure of a chiral nanotube, and is made from a 3D printed lattice, laser cut acrylic, a lazy susan bearing, 118 sample vials and a cylindrical lamp.

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2017

Alternative Periodic Table

From Useful Charts:

You'll notice that this periodic table looks quite a bit different from the one you're used to. The traditional periodic table is designed to emphasize the concept of valence, which is important for knowing which elements can easily combine with others to form compounds. In contrast, the periodic table below is designed to simply emphasize the way in which atoms are "built" (specifically, how electrons group together into shells and subshells).

It's based on a design proposed by Edward Mazurs in the 1960s. Like the traditional table, this alternative version can be used to find an elements name, number, atomic weight, state of matter, period, group, and block. However, it also contains detailed information on electron configurations and the different types of electron subshells.

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2017

New Rendering of ADOMAH Periodic Table

From Valery Tsimmerman, of the PerfectPeriodicTable.com and the ADOMAH Periodic Table:

"I received email from Dr. Marcus Wolf who is a chemist, working on renewable energy and electrochemical storage in Germany, near Nuremberg. He also lectures at Georg Simon Ohm, Technische Hochschule Nürnberg. Attached to his email was new version of ADOMAH Periodic Table that he created. In this new rendering he is using Jensen's Valence Manifold (VM)."

This is what Dr. Marcus Wolf wrote:

"The first one to come up with the idea of using a valence manifold VM = [e + v] as a label for the groups, was Will B. Jensen. He derived it from the very early attempts of Richard Abegg, who, at around 1904, brought up the hypothesis of 'main- and counter-valences', derived from the observable behavior of elements and their compounds in electrochemical experiments. Eric Scerri is citing Jensen in his latest book, in the chapter about Richard Abegg. But Jensen's proper article from 1983 or so is far more detailed and in his later publications he then introduces the valence manifold concept. Last weekend I accidentally observed another consistency between the G-values and their ordering and the valence electron counts, e. If you fix the e value of the starting group in a given l-block as e(initial), you could generate every G-number of a given group by adding the valence vacancy count, v, to it:

G = e(initial) + v.

"That is another hint for the consistency of the VM labelling concept."

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2017

NAWA Periodic Tables

Nagayasu Nawa - "A Japanese school teacher and periodic table designer" - has a home page showing all his designs:

NAWA Periodic Tables

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2017

Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table UPDATED

Stowe's 'A Physicist's Periodic Table' was published in 1989, and is a famous & well respected formulation of the periodic table.

Since 1989 quite a number of elements have been discovered and Jeries A. Rihani has produced an updated and extended version. Click here to see the full size .pdf version:

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2017

Clock Prism Periodic Table, Braille Version

From the prolific Nagayasu Nawa, a Braille version of the Clock Prism periodic table:

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2017

Stewart's Chemosphere

P J Stewart, a good friend of the periodic table database, has mapped a PT onto a sphere.

PJS writes: "It is Janet Rajeuni 2014  wrapped round a sphere, going back to Mazurs 1965, and Tsimmerman 2006.  Arabic numerals indicate shells (values of principal quantum number); Roman numerals indicate periods."

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Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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