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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables


There are hundreds of periodic tables in web space, but there is only one comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations post 2000 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

The 8 Periodic Tables most recently added to the database:

2015     UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology
2010     Newlands Revisited – Poster
1971     Clark, John O. E. Periodic Table
2014     Clock Periodic Table
2014     UVS Periodic Tables
2014     Press Release Story Elements
2010     Science Museum Lockers
2014     Stuff Stoners Like Periodic Table

2015

UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology

This configuration can topologically suggest the g-block cycle in the 8th period for extended periodic table.

In the Klein bottle topology as illustrated, it is plausible that after the s-block cycle in the 8th periodical cycle, the topological path continues to spiral around the outer f-block cycle to harmonically form 14 elements.

And then subjected to the spiral Möbius strip topological twist, it could resonate to form 4 more elements in the anti-cyclonic path around 17th, 18th, 1st, and 2nd angular phases of the anti-cyclonic core; this would render the 18 elemental positions for the hypothetical g-block cycle in the entire half-integral anti-cyclonic cycle of the Klein bottle topology.

Hypothetically, the topological path then moves into the cyclonic cycle, and harmonically forms its d-block and p-block cycles with 16 elemental positions to complete the 8th periodical cycle with a total of 36 elements.

UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology

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2010

Newlands Revisited – Poster

At the beginning of last year (Meyers, 2009), a IUPAC editorial offered "something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue".

Marks and Marks 2010 (M&M) preserves the old subgroups (Newlands' columns) that were a feature of all short forms, although M&M would then have been described as a 'medium form' (14 groups) in contrast to Mendeleyev's 'short form' (8 groups) or Werner's 'long form' (32 groups). M&M naturally continues the grouping of the lanthanoids/actinoids whose initial four groups were also included in 'short form' tables.

The logic of the arrangement of the s-elements is a new feature. It recognizes the chemical subgroups of hydrogen, viz. the alkali metals and the halogens, and of helium, viz. the alkaline earth metals and the inert gases. It is interesting to note that subgroups differ chemically from each other inversely as the azimuth, i.e. Li:F > Ca:Zn > La:Lu.

The whole idea is, of course, borrowed from Newlands. The group numbers are borrowed from valency but also from electronic structure in that the number of s, p, d, or f subgroups corresponds to the Pauli maximum for each. Finally, the mnemonic reflects that most elementary introduction to chemistry: alkalis turn Litmus blue.

From this start, the p-bloc is red, the transition elements yellow and the "rare earth" elements green, as argued in the M&M paper. The numbering of groups I - XIV is unambiguous, it is less than IUPAC's arbitrary 18 groups, it preserves subgroups and satisfactorily accommodates hydrogen and the lanthanoids/actinoids.

As required by Leigh (2009), this table is clear, simple and brief.

Newlands Revisited

GJ Leigh "Periodic Tables and IUPAC" Chemistry International 2009, 31: 4-6. EG Marks & JA Marks "Newlands Revisited: a periodic table for chemists" Foundations of Chemistry 2010, 12: 85-93. F Meyers "From the Editor" Chemistry International 2009, 31:1-2.

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1971

Clark, John O. E. Periodic Table

Thanks to René Vernon who found this formulation, and writes:

"Here's a strange table I found in the following book: Clark Jonh O.E. 1982, Chemistry (The Hamlyn Publishing Group, Feltham, Middlesex) ISBN 0600001245. The colour coding is exasperating. The way the table is laid out is bizarre. The copy I have is a reprint of the original 1971 edition so I have to wonder if the graphic designer was drawing inspiration from the trippy 60s."

Clock PT

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2014

Clock Periodic Table

Prof. Martyn Poliakoff of the University of Notting, and star of the Periodic Videos YouTube Channel, explains how he was given a periodic table clock by a Japanese School teacher... which he likes very much:

Clock PT

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2014

UVS Periodic Tables

From the Universal Vortical Singularity (UVS) website, two related formunations from the nucleosynthesis in the universe section, one showing a "manifold dual-core 3-sphere hypersphere topology", and the other showing a "dual-core Möbius strip topology":

UVS manifold dual-core 3-sphere hypersphere topology

UVS dual-core Möbius strip topology

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2014

Press Release Story Elements

From HustonPR:

If your presentation dosen't contain one or more of these story elements, the story does not exist:

press release story elements

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2010

Science Museum Lockers

From Kotaku:

While visiting the Nagoya City Science Museum, Twitter user Kantaku noticed something very cool, the coin lockers.

The name of each element is written below each symbol in Japanese, allowing visitors to store their belongings in Helium, Calcium, Oxygen, Potassium and more.

The number of each locker corresponds to the element. So, locker 21 is Scandium as it's the twenty-first element on the periodic table. Locker 3? It's Lithium, like it is on the periodic table, and so on. Dibs on Krypton!

Science Museum Lockers

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2014

Stuff Stoners Like Periodic Table

From Arizona's Medical Marijuana Industry Website, by Dan "Dank" Kingston, the Periodic Table of Stuff Stoners Like:

Olympic Lifts

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations post 2000 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

 

 


Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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