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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables


There are hundreds of periodic tables in web space, but there is only one comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

3-Dimensional Periodic Table formulations, by date:

1862     Telluric Helix or Screw
1872     Meyer's Spiral System
1881     Spring's Diagram
1898     Crookes' vis generatrix
1905     Gooch & Walker Periodic Table
1911     Emerson's Helix
1911     Soddy's Three-Dimensional System
1916     Harkins & Hall's Periodic Table
1920     Schaltenbrand's Helical Periodic Table
1920     Kohlweiler's System
1925     Friend's Periodic System
1925     Courtines' A Model of the Periodic Table
1928     Janet's Three-Dimensional Spiral-Tube System
1934     Romanoff's System
1943     Finke's Spatial System
1947     Stedman's Conic System
1948     Gamow [First] Ribbon Periodic Table
1949     Wringley's Lamina System
1951     Chicago Museum of Science & Industry Periodic Table
1960     Spherical Periodic Table
1961     Gamow's Wound Ribbon Periodic Table
1965     Alexander Arrangement of Elements
1965     Giguère's Periodic Table
1967     Mazurs' other 1967 Formulation
1969     Island of Stability
1972     Octagonal Prismatic Periodic Table
1974     Marzus Wooden Version of Mendeleev's Periodic Table
1974     Mazurs' PT Formulation Analysis
1980     Periodic RoundTable
1983     Cement Chemists Cubic Periodic Table
1983     Pyramid Periodic Table
1989     Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table
1990     Dufour's Periodic Tree
1995     Chemical Helix Periodic Table
1997     G.O.O.D. Periodic Table of The Elements
2000     Chemical Elements Pyramidal Diagram
2001     ElemenTouch Periodic Table
2002     System Québécium Periodic Table
2003     Cylinder With Bulges Periodic Table
2003     Elephant Periodic Table
2003     Electronegativity Periodic Table
2003     Ukrainian Periodic Table
2003     Bernard's Periodic Table of The Elements in Three Dimensional Form
2004     Rafael Poza Periodic Table
2005     Pyramid Format Periodic Table
2006     Bent's PlN and Ple (Front Step) Periodic Tables
2007     Gyroscopic Periodic Table
2007     Second Life Periodic Table
2008     Rafael Poza's Elements and the Magnetosphere
2008     ADOMAH Tetrahedron Periodic Table
2008     Tomás A. Carroll's Spherical & Russian Doll Formulations
2008     Stack of Elements Periodic Table
2008     Wheel Structure Periodic Table
2008     Teluric Helix from Gutierrez Samanez
2009     Steve Jensen's In-Finite Form
2009     Graphic Representations of the Periodic System
2009     Nasco’s Periodic Table Toss-Up Ball
2009     Russian MedFlower Periodic Table
2010     3-D Strange Periodic Table
2010     Harrington Projection for The 270 AMU Structure
2011     Bayeh's Theoretical Periodic Table of Elements
2011     Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table
2011     Bayeh's Theoretical 3D Periodic Tables
2011     Pacholek's Multipipe 3D Periodic Table
2011     Alashvili Rotating Spherical Periodikal Tabel
2011     Normal vs Correction Shell "Pi Paradox" for 1-270 AMUs
2012     3D Illustrated Alexander Arrangement of Elements
2013     4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table
2013     3D Left Step Periodic Table
2013     Bernard Periodic Spiral
2013     Model Wooden Periodic Table
2013     Atomic Periodic Town
2014     ADOMAH Periodic Table Glass Cube
2014     Gutierrez Samanez's Binodic Form of the Periodic Table (Video)
2014     Rogue Elements: What's Wrong with the Periodic Table
2014     UVS Periodic Tables
2014     Arrangement of Elements 7th Order & Element Sequences
2015     UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology
2015     Pams Quantum Periodic Table
2016     Instructables 3D Periodic Table
2017     Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table UPDATED
2017     Clock Prism Periodic Table, Braille Version
2017     Stewart's Chemosphere


1862

Telluric Helix or Screw

The French geologist , Alexandre-Émile Béguyer de Chancourtois was the first person to make use of atomic weights to produce a classification of periodicity. He drew the elements as a continuous spiral around a metal cylinder divided into 16 parts. The atomic weight of oxygen was taken as 16 and was used as the standard against which all the other elements were compared. Tellurium was situated at the centre, prompting vis tellurique, or telluric screw.

Chancourtois' original formulation includes elements in their correct places, selected compounds and some elements in more than one place. The helix was an important advance in that it introduced the concept of periodicity, but it was flawed. The formulation was rediscovered in the 1889 (P. J. Hartog, "A First Foreshadowing of the Periodic Law" Nature 41, 186-8 (1889)), and since then it has appeared most often in a simplified form that emphasizes the virtues and eliminates its flaws. [Thanks to CG for this info.]

Dutch Wikipedia, ScienceWorld & the Science and Society picture library.

Read more in Roy Alexander's All Periodic Tables site.

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1872

Meyer's Spiral System

Meyer's Spiral System of 1872 (from van Spronsen):

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1881

Spring's Diagram

From Quam & Quam's 1934 review paper.pdf

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1898

Crookes' vis generatrix

Model of Crookes’ vis generatrix of 1898, built by his assistant, Gardiner. From: Proc. R. Soc. Lond. 63, 408.

The vertical scale represents the atomic weight of the elements from H = 1 to Ur = 239.

Missing elements are represented by a white circle. Similar elements appear underneath each other:

Cutting Board

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1905

Gooch & Walker Periodic Table

Mazurs' reproduction (p. 82) of a periodic table formulation by Frank Austin Gooch and Claude Frederic Walker, from Outlines of Inorganic Chemistry, Macmillan, London and New York, p. 8/9, 1905 (ref Mazurs p.188):

Thanks to Laurie Palmer for the tip, and to Philip Stewart for the corrections and details.

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1911

Emerson's Helix

From Quam & Quam's 1934 review paper.pdf

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1911

Soddy's Three-Dimensional System

Soddy's three-dimensional system of 1911 (from van Spronsen):

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1916

Harkins & Hall's Periodic Table

From Quam & Quam's 1934 review paper.pdf

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1920

Schaltenbrand's Helical Periodic Table

From Quam & Quam's 1934 review paper.pdf

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1920

Kohlweiler's System

Kohlweiler's system of 1920 (from van Spronsen):

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1925

Friend's Periodic System

From Quam & Quam's 1934 review paper.pdf

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1925

Courtines' A Model of the Periodic Table or Periodic Classification

Published in J. Chem. Ed., 2, 2, 107-109 in 1925 by M. Courtines of the Laboratory of Experimental Physics, College of France, Paris.

We do not know the date of the forth image (below), but it looks as if it was prepared a few years later. However, it is a 'top down' view of the 3D formulation.

Courtines 3D PT

Courtines PT

Courtines classification

From Quam & Quam's 1934 review paper.pdf

Courtines classification

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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1928

Janet's Three-Dimensional Spiral-Tube System

Janet's Three-Dimensional Spiral-Tube System of 1928 (from van Spronsen):

Click here for large diagram.

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1934

Romanoff's System

Romanoff's System of 1934 (from van Spronsen):

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1943

Finke's Spatial System

Finke's spatial system of 1943 (from van Spronsen):

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1947

Stedman's Conic System

Stedman's conic system of 1947 (from van Spronsen):

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1948

Gamow [First] Ribbon Periodic Table

George Gamow is well known for his Gamow 1961 ribbon formulation, but this actually first appeared in a 1948 book: One, Two, Three... Infinity.

Conal Boyce writes:

"The 1961 version looks like something Gamow redrew from scratch, adding about a dozen new items as he went (also an extra loop), but also introducing some 4 or 5 goofy errors: the non-existent Fa for Ga, the misplaced Ba where Sr belongs, etc. In comparison, the 1948 version lacks those dozen updates but is free of the goofy typo type errors that crept into the 1961 version. Also, the 1948 version has the distinction of being "it" so to speak, as the moment when the Gamow scheme first appeared on the scene, to be reprinted in a 1953 paperback, which is where I first saw it, in 1953.":

Thanks to Conal for the tip!

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1949

Wringley's Lamina System

Wringley's lamina system of 1949 (from van Spronsen):

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1951

Chicago Museum of Science & Industry Periodic Table

Periodic Table of Elements - Ca. 1950's - The ninety-two elements are here arrayed in colorful and orderly fashion. These "building blocks of the universe" stand beneath the great central dome of the Museum.

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1960

Spherical Periodic Table

Unfortunately, this wonderful formulation from a Union Carbide advertisement (1960) does not work; it is not (in this author's opinion) possible to wrap the PT onto a sphere:

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1961

Gamow's Wound Ribbon Periodic Table

From George Gamow's 1961 book, The Atom and Its Nucleus. There is an earlier 1948 version.

Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip!

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1965

Alexander Arrangement of Elements

The Alexander Arrangement of Elements is a 3D periodic table concept based on strict adherence to the Periodic Law, and, like the first representation of elements in periods by de Chancourtois, connects every element data box in unbroken order.

Roy Alexander, a Brooklyn born science museum exhibit and teaching aid designer, has told me in a personal communication: "I came up with the idea (being ignorant of anything but the flat Sargent Welch charts) in 1965. I wasn't able to patent [the downslant in the p-block] until 1971." (U.S.Patent #3,581,409)

At the time Roy had no idea that others had employed a similar technique to build a 3D table – including the very first periodic table developer, de Chancourtois, who is often credited with being the original discoverer of the periodicity of elements and the originator of the three-dimensional method of element arrangement and representation.

These 3D forms attempt to return the Seaborg separated f–block to its proper position in the table rather than remaining exiled. This, and contemporary attitudes about Hydrogen as being in more families than one – is uniquely addressed in Roy's 3D models.

Subsequent study of the Periodic Law and the periodic table's value in education convinced Roy that the basic rationale for developing the Alexander Arrangement of Elements was only one of the many good reasons for producing it for the public to share, so he sought and was granted a U.S. patent on the p-block downslant in order to manufacture and market the AAEs as teaching/learning aids.

Roy Alexander's goal of introducing the AAE into classrooms, laboratories, chemistry textbooks, and reference material remains the same today, but rather than replacing the conventional charts, its niche in education is at the very point that a lesson on arrangement of atoms into a chart begins. Element sequencing (vs. 24 breaks/gaps) credits the chart as well as the Periodic Law, which establishes subsequent confidence in the common flat charts, much as the world globe establishes the reality, and flat printed projections - maps - are vital (and relished) for convenience.

The first commercial production of Alexander Arrangements was in 1995, when Roy pioneered by constructing a website - periodictable.com - for marketing. Three versions were printed: two versions for student entry of element symbols, the larger die-cut for easier assembly.

An even larger model was produced with basic element data printed in the boxes, also die cut. These were printed on white card stock, with black ink.

Another version (below) was produced in conjunction with ATMI's annual report in 2000. This was added to Roy's product offerings, called the DeskTopper, and is still available. They are die cut to form a 7.25" high model with the f-block position attached after La, but can be altered to put La on the f-block. (See AAE Features at the top of this page.)

Besides the hands-on educational application, the DeskTopper can be used as a pen & pencil caddy, and flattened without losing the continuity of the element data. This flattened form has suggested design of a Braille periodic table of the same format, and this is also being pursued.

Marketing the Alexander Arrangements was moved to AllPeriodicTables.com in cooperation with Theodore Gray in 2006, who purchased the PeriodicTable.com domain name and funded the production of Roy's newest model, illustrated with Theo's amazing element photos.

For the first time, the elements beyond those naturally occurring have been omitted from a modern periodic table, simplifying initiation to chemistry. This factor denies the concept of obsolescence, and this version has been called the Forever Periodic Table. Details of this new 3D periodic table model kit have been placed at 3DPeriodicTable.com.

Further AAE information and images may be found at the Alexander Arrangement website.

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1965

Giguère's Periodic Table

Paul Giguère's Periodic Table formulation, from here:

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1967

Mazurs' other 1967 Formulation

From Edward G. Mazurs' 1974 (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press:

Mazurs 1967

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1969

Island of Stability

From Wikipedia: The island of stability in nuclear physics describes a set of as-yet undiscovered isotopes of transuranium elements which are theorized to be much more stable than others. The possibility was proposed by Glenn T. Seaborg in the late 1960s: Prospectd for Further Considerable Extension of the Periodic Table, J.Chem.Educ., 46, 626-633 (1969) and reprinted in Modern Alchemy: Selected Papers of Glenn T. Seaborg (1994).

The hypothesis is that the atomic nucleus is built up in "shells" in a manner similar to the structure of the much larger electron shells in atoms. In both cases, shells are just groups of quantum energy levels that are relatively close to each other.

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1972

Octagonal Prismatic Periodic Table

In the Journal of Chemical Education (1972), Tang Wah Kow of New Method College Hong Kong, presents an octagonal prismatic periodic table:

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1974

Marzus Wooden Version of Mendeleev's Periodic Table

There is a posting in the The Elements Unearthed blog by David V Black concerning a view of the Marzus archive:

"My biggest discovery this week has been a collection in our archives of the notes of Edward Mazurs, who wrote the definitive work on classifying different systems of periodic tables in 1957 with a revised edition in 1974 (Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press). He collected articles and wrote extensive, detailed notes on every version of the periodic table he could find as it developed from its start in the early 1860s with the work of de Chancourtois through 1974. All of those notes have been donated to Chemical Heritage Foundation and fill up ten binders, with meticulous drawings, charts, tables, and frequent additions and changes. There are also some pieces of the original artwork prepared for the book, and a wooden model of the periodic table Mazurs built himself. "

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1974

Mazurs' PT Formulation Analysis

In his 1974 book Edward G. Mazurs (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press gives a comprehensive analysis of periodic table formulations.

Mazurs identifies most PT formulations as being:

  • Spiral
  • Plane lemniscate
  • Concentric circles
  • Helix on a cylinder
  • Helix on a cone
  • Space lemniscate
  • Space concentric circles

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1980

Periodic RoundTable

Gary Katz says: "The Periodic RoundTable is a unique three-dimensional model of the Periodic Table, an elegant spatial arrangement of the chemical elements that is both symmetrical and mathematical. It is the ultimate refinement of Mendeleev's scheme, one that will take us into the twenty-first century and beyond. The Periodic RoundTable possesses such a high degree of order because it is based exclusively on the system of ideal electronic configuration, which in turn is the basis of periodicity among the elements. In the Periodic RoundTable the electron shells are filled in the same order as the elements themselves appear, demonstrating a holistic relationship between the chemistry of the elements and the orbital descriptions of their electrons."

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1983

Cement Chemists Cubic Periodic Table (Model)

Click here for large image.

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1983

Pyramid Periodic Table (Model)

Click here for large image.

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1989

Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table

The Physicist's Periodic Table by Timothy Stowe is a well know formulation for those interested in such things, but for a long time its origin was been lost. Eric Scerri has rediscovered the original formulation: a 1989 publication by the company Instruments Research and Industry (I2R) Inc:



 

From Wikipedia, this Stowe Format Periodic Table is Based on a graphic from Scholten J."Secret Lanthanides", 2005, ISBN 90-74817-16-5;

Eric Scerri has developed an updated version of the Stowe formulation, here.

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1990

Dufour's Periodic Tree

The Dufour Periodictree periodic table formulation, from here:

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1995

Helical Periodic Table

Tarquin Publications sell a make-your-own three dimensional, helical periodic table.

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1997

Good Periodic Table of The Elements

From the Good Periodic Table website:

"The Geometric Organisation Of Dimension, aka 'G.O.O.D', Periodic Tables primary function acts as an identifier of relationships between like particles of matter. This operates utilising the original Sample process first discovered by Mendeleev; were atoms that are linked in a straight line hold a unique relationship as compared to the rest of the atoms on the table."

 

Good

Good

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2000

Chemical Elements Pyramidal Diagram

A Chemical Elements Pyramidal Diagram by Thomas Zerkov.

"The present work introduces a new arrangement of the chemical elements. Unlike the most popular existing arrangements, which are two-dimensional, this new arrangement is three-dimensional. It organizes the elements in a pyramidal structure of four levels, giving a clear spatial expression of different relations between the chemical elements. Since the three-dimensional structures are harder to perceive than the two-dimensional ones, the present work also suggests a two-dimensional table representation of the three-dimensional pyramidal diagram, where the four levels are all placed in a single plane, instead of one above the other."

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2001

ElemenTouch Periodic Table

Yoshiteru MAENO writes:

"I am a Physics Prof. at Kyoto University, Japan. My field of study is experimental superconductivity. I recently found the work by Schaltenbrand in 1920 on your website. One might say that Elementouch is a re-invention of Schaltenbrand's, but by arranging the element names helically on three cylinders, its usefulness has been improved":

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2002

System Québécium Periodic Table

Using Google Translate of this page:

"To establish a new classification system components, Pierre Demers was assumed that the electronic structure of the atom contains one of my all others according to the equation Z = 117 to Z = 1. It is taking my electrons and removing them from my material that can reproduce all the elements and thus repeat the structure of your table. That is why this new organization is called the System Québécium":

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2003

John Denker's Cylinder With Bulges

John Denker fully discusses the logic behind a three dimensional periodic table that he describes as a "cylinder with bulges", here:

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2003

Elephant Periodic Table

The periodic table does not map to an elephant very well:

Click on the poster below to go to a large version:

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2003

Electronegativity Periodic Table

"This image distorts the conventional periodic table of the elements so that the greater the electronegativity of an atom, the higher its position in the table", here:

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2003

Ukrainian Periodic Table

A Periodic Table from the Ukraine:

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2003

Bernard's Periodic Table of The Elements in Three Dimensional Form

Hinsdale Bernard's Periodic Table of The Elements in Three Dimensional Form, US Patent 7,297,000:

Roy Alexender, of the Desk Topper arrangement, has photoshopped a blurry photograph sent by Bernard along with a product mockup:

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2004

Rafael Poza Periodic Table (Click to Enlarge)

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2005

Pyramid Format Periodic Table

From Wikipedia, this Pyramid Format Periodic Table is Based on a graphic from Scholten J."Secret Lanthanides", 2005, ISBN 90-74817-16-5;

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2006

Bent's PlN and Ple (Front Step) Periodic Tables

In his book, New Ideas in Chemistry from Fresh Energy for the Periodic Law, here, Henry Bent introduces the PlN and Ple (Front Step) Periodic Tables, Figs 50 & 52:

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2007

Gyroscopic Periodic Table

From the Garuda Biodynamics web site: "The Gyroscopic Periodic Table has been a natural progression developed from a study of Soil Science, Dr Steiner's Agriculture and Medical Courses, Astronomy and Astrology."


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2007

Second Life Periodic Table

From the Useful Chemistry blog: "Further adding to the set of chemistry tools in Second Life, Hiro Sheridan has created a 3D periodic table with rotating atoms. Although not directly proportional, the relative sizes of the spheres are in the correct order. Clicking on them provides basic information about the corresponding element. The 3D periodic table is available on the Chemistry Corner on Drexel Island."

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2008

Rafael Poza's Elements and the Magnetosphere

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2008

ADOMAH Tetrahedron

Valery Tsimmerman has developed various periodic table formulations, available at perfect perioidic table.com.

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2008

Tomás A. Carroll's Spherical & Russian Doll Formulations

Tomás A. Carroll has devised a spherical formulation of the Periodic Table, and from this a nested Russian Doll formulation.

Tomás writes: "I accept your veiled challenge that it is not possible to formulate a spherical periodic table and propose two solutions for your consideration. The EXCEL spreadsheet shows exactly how I transformed the quantum numbers from the standard 4D Cartesian coordinates to spherical coordinates in 3D, using two different centers. I included cylindrical coordinates too, just for fun."

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2008

Periodic Stack of Particles

Quantum Vectors and Atomic Stack Symmetry© (This page only renders properly in Explorer.)

The Janet Periodic Table of Elements (1929) may be re-arranged as a series of square matrices. The matrices are of different sizes and each matrix organizes the atomic orbitals into square concentric rings. Each cell may be assigned an atomic number which also identifies a “most significant electron”. The matrices may be stacked vertically to form “The Periodic Stack of Elements” as shown below.

The sub-atomic particles may also be arranged as square matrices. These matrices may be stacked to form “The Periodic Stack of Particles”.

Please send your comments to: doulting@shaw.ca    Last Revision 21 April 2008. 

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2008

Wheel Structure Periodic Table

From the Science Photo Library, a computer illustration representing the periodic table of the elements as a wheel structure.

  • The radiating spokes are the groups and are colour coded.
  • The heights of the columns represent the elements' atomic numbers, being the numbers of protons in their nuclei. The elements in any one group share many chemical and physical properties.
  • At the wheel's centre is the first element, hydrogen, (H, white).
  • At the end of each spoke, the elements are unnamed, and only their atomic numbers are shown, from 110-120.
  • The transition elements (upper left, orange) and the Lanthanides and Actinides (upper right) are blocks of elements with predictably varying properties.

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2008

Teluric Helix from Gutierrez Samanez

The Teluric Helix from Gutierrez Samanez is inspired by the telluric helix Chancortois (1864) with the difference that the sequence of the elements are rolled into a cone shape rather than a cylinder:

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2009

Steve Jensen's "In-Finite Form"

"I'm a figurative sculptor, living in Minneapolis MN. A few years ago, while looking at a two dimensional version of the periodic table, I too wondered if it would be possible to create a Periodic Table without any visual breaks in its numerical sequence. Although I had never seen anything other than the rectangular flat table, I thought I might be able to solve this spatial continuity problem three dimensionally. I also wanted to limit myself to using a 3-D "line" that had no sudden changes in direction. After coming up with what I thought was a new and unique sculptural resolution, I put the project aside. Only recently (after re-building my paper model out of a translucent material) did I do some research on the web, and immediately recognized the strong likeness between my version and the Alexander Arrangement. Even more surprising was my models' visual similarity to Crookes' figure eight design from some 111 years ago.

"Although there are obviously many inventive and well thought out responses to this design challenge, I believe that my solution is a unique one, and an improvement over some of the previous three dimensional forms. The "line" of my model allows for contiguous numerical placement of all the symbols (while maintaining group continuity along its vertical axis), even as the shape of its plan view makes visual reference to the well-known symbol for infinity. What's more, in my version, the Lanthanide & Actinide series do not occupy a separate field but are fully integrated into the continuous linear flow. This piece, which I've entitled "In-Finite Form" speaks to the mystery of the endless flow of space, even as it folds back onto itself within the confines of a finite system."

Steve Jensen ©September 2009

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2009

Graphic Representations of the Periodic System

Mary E. Saecker writes an article in Chemical Education Digital Library, Periodic Table Presentations and Inspirations: Graphic Representations of the Periodic System, that reviews some periodic table formunations.

The paper contains a link to this pdf file which gives templates and instructions for several print, cut-out & build periodic table formulations:

Supplement to: Periodic Table Presentations and Inspirations by Mary E. Saecker, J. Chem. Educ., 2009, 86, 1151.

Construction Directions A Cut-Out Chart of the Periodic System (Periodic Table Cylinder)

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2009

Nasco’s Periodic Table Toss-Up Ball

Toss some fun around the classroom with this 15" inflatable ball challenging students to name 118 elements from the Periodic Table. Two or more players toss the ball to each other, giving the element name for the number and symbol on which their left thumb lands. Answer sheet and instructions included. Grade 6 to adult.

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2009

Russian MedFlower Periodic Table

Google Russian to English translation:

From Secology.Narod.RU: "Must also give up the basic heuristic principle of Mendeleev and follow him. Forget about the group, we will not argue with what period begins, but just consistently and continuously to build all the elements in a row in ascending order, and fold this series into a spatial helix, in the corporeal form, allowing the convergence of such chemical elements in the vertical..."

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2010

3-D Strange Periodic Table

As Lewis Page of The Register puts it: "Top flight international reverse-alchemy boffins say they have managed to transmute gold into an entirely new form of 'negatively strange' antihypernucleic antimatter...", here.

The effect is to add a third dimension of quark strangeness to the periodic table. Read the abstract by the STAR Collaboration.

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2010

Harrington Projection for The 270 AMU Structure

From Bill Harrington, Founder/CTO of Rainforest Reactor Research and Temporal Dynamics Laboratory, comes a Harrington Projection for The 270 AMU Structure :

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2011

Bayeh's Theoretical Periodic Table of Elements

"The modern periodic table is based on quantum numbers and blocks, many problems faced the scientists and researchers when arranging the elements in the traditional and modern periodic tables as placing some elements in the incorrect place as (He) Helium, (La) Lanthanide and many others elements..." read the full pdf article here:

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2011

Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table

Eric Scerri made contact, writing: "Following the discussions on Periodic Table debate on the Chemistry Views website here, and as a result of recent turns, I have developed a new periodic table which I believe combines virtues of the Stowe table and also the Janet left-step table. I propose the name Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table. The explanation is posted on the Chemistry Views debate pages.

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2011

Bayeh's Theoretical 3D Periodic Tables

From Bayeh Claude: "I have designed these periodic tables as developments of Bayeh's Theoretical Periodic Table, but I have introduced new shapes and 3D versions":

  • Crocodile Periodic Table
  • Ship Periodic Table
  • Snake Periodic Table
  • Spiral Periodic Table
  • Spiral rectangular Periodic Table
  • Spiral triangular Periodic Table

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2011

Pacholek's Multipipe 3D Periodic Table

"I've recently invented a new type of periodic table. My table is 3-dimensional and is similar to the ADOMAH Periodic Table, but it's also very different from the ADOMAH Tetrahedron. Its main advantage is being fully geometric in the plane spanned by n, l and n+l quantum numbers."

Take a look at the Picasa images here and here:

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2011

Alashvili Rotating Spherical Periodikal Tabel

A nice rotating, spherical (3-D) periodic table by Tornike Alashvili, from Georgia, which can be viewed here as a .swf image:

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2011

Normal vs Correction Shell "Pi Paradox" for 1-270 AMUs

From Bill Harrington, Founder/CTO of Rainforest Reactor Research and Temporal Dynamics Laboratory, comes a Normal vs Correction Shell "Pi Paradox" for 1-270 AMUs:

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2012

3D Illustrated Alexander Arrangement of Elements

The design of the 2012 Alexander Arrangement of Elements (AAE) follows the principles of a three-dimensional model developed by Roy Alexander in 1965: a printed representation of element information based on strict adherence to the Periodic Law, with every element data box physically and visually contiguous and continuous within the sequence of atomic numbers in generally accepted element property related columns - "...the periodic table the way it's supposed to be".

This is made possible by wrapping, folding, and joining the printed material and employing the patented p-block downslant of the element data boxes to allow the end element of a period to be adjacent to the first element of the next period.

Several unique features separate it from the previous four versions of the AAE

  • The visual effect mirrors the look of Theodore Gray's series of posters, books, element cards and periodictable.com website and apps for the Apple iPod and iPad.
  • Each element box is dominated by a Theodore Gray element photograph, with the element name, letter symbol, and atomic number relatively large, often overlapping the photo.
  • The period numbers (below, right) are printed at the interface of the end/beginning of the periods, folded 90 degrees on the model, and the blocks and columns (old & new numbers), are identified below the data boxes - and in the case of the Actinoids, above.

  • The element blocks connect at a central nexus (below, center), with the d- and f-blocks leaving, looping, and returning there, thus allowing the shorter period gaps above to be closed. For best visibility of the element data, these loops pinch together near the intersection. The p-block bends in a half-circle to join the s-block at the corner described above, with a patented 'downslant' where the element boxes gracefully sweep down a full box height (above) within this block to allow elimination of the "carriage return" effect: each period ending on the row above the next.

  • The extended Hydrogen data box, a characteristic of all Alexander Arrangements, is more extended in this model, reaching for the multiple positions of the H box that are still under discussion among experts. The extra-extended Hydrogen box, illustrated by a composite image of a hydrogen cloud in space, (above, right) loops over the s- and p-blocks. Starting up from behind the corner of Helium & Lithium, inside the half-helical tube to loop over Helium, attach above Lithium, Beryllium and then Carbon as the loop descends (joining the ascending portion) over the data boxes of the s- & p-blocks, terminating in contact with Fluorine, Neon, and corner-on to Neon.
  • The model size is the same as the previous Display Version of the AAE, but has fewer element data boxes, due to there being no photos of the lab created elements and for simplification of the educational application - introduction to property periodicity and organization of element data - the elements with atomic numbers over 94 are not included (see addendum).
  • Where the f-block begins and ends, between Barium and Lutetium, the f-block is held perpendicular to the only flat segment of the element display by a pair of triangular braces, which also create the flat area, aligning the s-block with the 'pinch' of the d-block. This is particularly apparent from the bottom, when the model is supported from above. (see below)

Designed by Roy Alexander, a science museum exhibit and teaching aid designer, the Adobe Illustrator art for the model was started by Ann Grafelman, and continued by Roy from mid 2011 through November of 2012.

Photos were provided by Theodore Gray, and Element Collection funded the printing and die cutting performed by Strine Printing in York, Pennsylvania. The model kit was first offered at Theo's PeriodicTable.com, then at Roy's AllPeriodicTables.com and the new 3dPeriodicTable.com, which site is dedicated to the 3D Forever Periodic Table only, with add-ons, application suggestions, and descriptions and commentary of all sorts.

Assembly instructions and step photos, as well as a number or completed model color photographs are included with the kit. These were developed with prototype models, and while functional, have been upgraded and accompanied by an assembly video at AlexanderArrangementOfElements.com/3D

Addendum:

Text relating to the abbreviation of the ever increasing number of elements is explained at two places on the 3D AAE illustrated periodic table model kit. One will remain with the model and one is removed at the time of assembly.

That which remains runs under the Actinoids and the d-block elements, where the lab created elements might ordinarily be expected to be found, says:

The lab created elements ordinarily found in this part of a periodic table are not to be found in nature, there can be no photographs of them, so nothing needs to be added to this element photo periodic table - ever - so it will never be obsolete, a Forever Periodic Table.

That which is removed says:

Naturally-occurring elements have been numbered variously, generally between 80 and 96, all for cogent scientific reasons.

For easier teaching and learning, we have included on this periodic table only the 92 elements actually currently existing on Earth and in the remainder of the Universe, and adding Technetium and Promethium, which, although they may have no stable forms, serve to fill what would otherwise be gaps in the sequence.

Not added for practical and educational reasons are 'elements' consisting only of pages and pages of computer data from smashing atoms in particle accelerators. Another reason is that there can be no photographs of them to show, and as a result, your arrangement is complete and never be obsolete - your Forever Periodic Table.

Included with the art of the periodic table on the die cut substrate that makes up the model is some background information about the the history of three dimensional periodic tables.

The first of these is about the discoverer of the concept of arranging the elements in periods suggested by the properties of the elements, de Chancourtois.

The second 3D periodic table information piece (on the rear of the de Chancourtois removable card) are sketches of a number of the 3D periodic tables found on the Chemogenesis website.

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2013

4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table

By Jgmoxness

"I've replaced the standard periodic table in the 7th "Chemistry Pane" of my E8 visualizer with a 2D/3D/4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri version of the Periodic Table."

"Interestingly, it has 120 elements, which is the number of vertices in the 600 Cell or the positive half of the 240 E8 roots. It is integrated into VisibLie_E8 so clicking on an element adds that particular atomic number's E8 group vertex number to the 3rd E8 visualizer pane. The code is a revision and extension of Enrique Zeleny's Wolfram Demonstration":

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2013

3D Left Step Periodic Table

By Masahiko Suenaga, Kyushu University, Japan a 3D Left Step Periodic Table.

"Inspired by the work of Dr. Tsimmerman and Dr. Samanez, I have created a new 3D Left Step Periodic Table, which resembles to Mt. Fuji, recently registered as a World Heritage site. For more information, please visit my website":

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2013

Bernard Periodic Spiral

The Bernard Periodic Spiral of the Elements (BPSE), depicts a novel rendition of the Periodic Table that replaces the flat rectangular format with a continuous unidirectional spiral that maintains all the properties of Group and Period formation.

Comparisons may be made with similar models spanning the last three decades of the 20th century (Alexander, 1971; Mazurs, 1974; & Kaufman, 1999).

In the chart form, this new rendition is referred to as the Elliptical Periodic Chart of the Elements. In the three-dimensional form, the model resembles a Christmas tree in shape with the 7 Periods represented as circular platforms situated at various levels with the elements placed appropriately at the outer edges of each of these platforms as a Period builds up. The elements may be represented as spherical objects or flat discs with radii proportionate to atomic radii (or reasonable approximations). Color schemes accentuate the four different Blocks of elements: the s-Block (green), the p-Block (blue, with the exception that the last Group is red signifying the end of a Period), d-Block (orange), and the f-Block (yellow). The grey section, called the Group-Period Interchange, is where the end of a particular Period connects to the beginning of the next Period, and, at the same time, transitions from Group 18 to Group 1.

Watch the video here:

<Bernard Periodic Spiral>

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Model Wooden Periodic Table

From here, and translated from Spanish:

Among the events commemorating the 75th anniversary of the creation of the School of Treball, the author of this site, B. Navarro, along with J. Semis and J. Gràcia have built a model wooden periodic table.

The table has been divided into 5 areas: representative elements, noble gases, transition elements, rare earths and finally the groups I and II of alkali and alkaline earth together. Each of these areas of the table is made with a different type of wood. The block transition elements is made with oak, ash noble gases, representative elements in cherry, sapele the rare earth and alkali/alcalinoterros beechwood.

The central idea of the model is that each element is represented by a cube of 3 cm edge so that you can see on all sides, from left to right or right to left without losing the order of increasing atomic number or the relative position of the elements:

Wooden Periodic TableWooden Periodic Table

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2013

Atomic Periodic Town

Three related formulations by Baha Tangour (Tangour Bahoueddine), the Atomic Town and two Boomerang periodic tables.

Baha says: "The propositions are different representation of a 3D dimensions that depend on three properties (spectral term multiplicity, lone-pairs and period number)":

Kabbalistic

 

Kabbalistic

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2014

ADOMAH Periodic Table Glass Cube

Valery Tsimmerman, of the ADOMAH Periodic Table and the ADOMAH Tetrahedron, has now used these ideas to produce a beautiful glass cube:

 

This amazing object is available for sale from Grand Illusions:

 

A Note by Philip Stewart stewart.phi@gmail.com

The cube represents 120 chemical elements etched into a cube of Optical Crystal glass. The s, p, d, and f blocks of the Janet periodic table form four rectangles, which are slices of a regular tetrahedron, parallel with two of its edges and with two faces of the circumscribed cube. All four quantum numbers are made visible in this arrangement. You can see a 2-D version on the Perfect Periodic Table website, click on the "skyscraper" version on the right to see the tetrahedron, and go to Regular Tetrahedron at foot of page for details.

The regular tetrahedron is the only form in which slices are rectangles of different shape and identical perimeter. When each orbital is represented by a square of unit edge, the rectangles representing the blocks all have the same perimeter, which is twice the length of the edges of the tetrahedron (which are of course √2 times the edges of the cube): 18 units = 2(values of n + values of ml).

Block
values of
n
values of
ml
s
8
1
p
6
3
d
4
5
f
2
7

Valery Tsimmerman, orahct@gmail.com, creator of the design, has written to me as follows:

"I just had some thoughts about the Perimeter Rule that is at the basis of the tetrahedral arrangement. Dimensions of the blocks are dictated by number of values of ml and number of values of n. We know that n governs quantization of energy. Recently I learned that quantization of the possible orientations of L with respect to an external magnetic field is often referred to as space quantization. (Serway, Jewett: Physics for Scientists and Engineers. 6th edition. p.1369).

"That is, ml stands for space quantization. Therefore, the Perimeter Rule reflects a direct relationship between energy and space. I think that this could have some significance. The beautiful thing about the Universe is that each type of symmetry is related to some conservation law. Symmetry in time is related to energy. Therefore, n is related to time also, so, in the Perimeter Rule we have relationship between time and space on quantum numerical level. The interesting thing is that ml can be positive and negative, while n can only be positive. Similarly, things can move in space in positive and negative directions, but time has only one direction. There is no negative time, just as there are no negative values of quantum number n."

Adomah is a variant of Adamah, Hebrew for 'dust of the earth', from which Adam was made (Genesis 2:7).

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2014

Gutierrez Samanez's Binodic Form of the Periodic Table (Video)

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2014

Rogue Elements: What's Wrong with the Periodic Table

An article in New Scientist by Celeste Biever (news editor at Nature), Image by Martin Reznik

Weights gone awry, elements changing position, the ructions of relativity – chemistry's iconic chart is far from stable, and no one knows where it will end

IF IMITATION is the sincerest form of flattery, the periodic table has many true admirers. Typefaces, types of meat and even the Muppets have been ordered in its image. For chemists, knowing an element's position in the periodic table, and the company it keeps, is still the most reliable indicator of its properties – and a precious guide in the search for new substances. "It rivals Darwin's Origin of Species in terms of the impact of bringing order out of chaos," says Peter Edwards of the University of Oxford.

The origins of the periodic table lie in the 19th century, when chemists noticed that patterns began to emerge among the known chemical elements when they... click here to continue:

What's wrong

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2014

UVS Periodic Tables

From the Universal Vortical Singularity (UVS) website, two related formunations from the nucleosynthesis in the universe section, one showing a "manifold dual-core 3-sphere hypersphere topology", and the other showing a "dual-core Möbius strip topology":

UVS manifold dual-core 3-sphere hypersphere topology

UVS dual-core Möbius strip topology

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2014

Arrangement of Elements 7th Order & Element Sequences

An exploration of some mathematics underlying the periodic table, read the PDF here, by Olivier Joseph.

Oliver says:

"May I propose you the following pattern, as the result of a personal study concerning the arrangement of the Elements, including sequences. Based on some hypothesis and as depicted in the enclosed illustrations, the elements are positioned according to a spiral function of atomic number and atomic mass, representation in 2D in a spiral form pattern, or in 3D conical helix model.

"The elements are numbered and placed consecutively along this spiral according to a specific angle, appropriately established between each element, forming a seven arm spiral pattern. With such an angle, specifically defined, a link is established between the various elements of a same group (corresponding to chemical elements with similar properties) and different layers. These latter becoming distributed among each arm of the spiral in a notable arranged way."

Arrangement of Elements 7th Order & Element Sequences

Arrangement of Elements 7th Order & Element Sequences

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2015

UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology

This configuration can topologically suggest the g-block cycle in the 8th period for extended periodic table.

In the Klein bottle topology as illustrated, it is plausible that after the s-block cycle in the 8th periodical cycle, the topological path continues to spiral around the outer f-block cycle to harmonically form 14 elements.

And then subjected to the spiral Möbius strip topological twist, it could resonate to form 4 more elements in the anti-cyclonic path around 17th, 18th, 1st, and 2nd angular phases of the anti-cyclonic core; this would render the 18 elemental positions for the hypothetical g-block cycle in the entire half-integral anti-cyclonic cycle of the Klein bottle topology.

Hypothetically, the topological path then moves into the cyclonic cycle, and harmonically forms its d-block and p-block cycles with 16 elemental positions to complete the 8th periodical cycle with a total of 36 elements.

UVS Periodic Table Model of a Klein Bottle Topology

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2015

Pams Quantum Periodic Table

By Dr. N. D. Raju, the Pams Quantum Periodic Table. Read the full paper discussing the logic of the new formulation.

ADOMAH Periodic Table and Normal Distribution

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2016

Instructables 3D Periodic Table

From Makendo on the Instructables website:

The first periodic table was developed in 1862 by a French geologist called Alexandre-Émile Béguyer de Chancourtois. He plotted the elements on a cylinder with a circumference of 16 units, and noted the resulting helix placed elements with similar properties in line with each other. But his idea - which he called the "Telluric Spiral" (see here), because the element tellurium was near the middle - never caught on, perhaps because it was published in a geology journal unread by chemists, and because de Chancourtois failed to include the diagram and described the helix as a square circle triangle.

Mendeleev got all the glory, and it is his 1869 version (dramatically updated, but still recognizable) that nearly everyone uses today.

This instructable [project] documents my efforts to reimagine a 3D periodic table of the elements, using modern making methods. It's based on the structure of a chiral nanotube, and is made from a 3D printed lattice, laser cut acrylic, a lazy susan bearing, 118 sample vials and a cylindrical lamp.

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2017

Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table UPDATED

Stowe's 'A Physicist's Periodic Table' was published in 1989, and is a famous & well respected formulation of the periodic table.

Since 1989 quite a number of elements have been discovered and Jeries A. Rihani has produced an updated and extended version. Click here to see the full size .pdf version:

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2017

Clock Prism Periodic Table, Braille Version

From the prolific Nagayasu Nawa, a Braille version of the Clock Prism periodic table:

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2017

Stewart's Chemosphere

P J Stewart, a good friend of the periodic table database, has mapped a PT onto a sphere.

PJS writes: "It is Janet Rajeuni 2014  wrapped round a sphere, going back to Mazurs 1965, and Tsimmerman 2006.  Arabic numerals indicate shells (values of principal quantum number); Roman numerals indicate periods."

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Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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