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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables


There are hundreds of periodic tables in web space, but there is only one comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

Periodic Table formulations from the years 1950 - 1999, by date:

1950     The Modern Periodic Table
1950     Clark's Updated Periodic Table
1950     Scheele's System
1950     Elements Known in the Year 1950
1951     Longman's Mural from Festival of Britain
1951     Chicago Museum of Science & Industry Periodic Table
1951     Rodríguez Tabla Periódica de los Elementos Químicos
1951     Mellor's Periodic Series of the Elements
1951     Tomkeieff's Periodic Table Formulation Formula
1953     Mendoza Periodic Table
1954     Sanderson's "One More" Periodic Table
1955     Mazurs' Valence Periodic Table
1955     Mazurs' Periodic Table
1955     Krafft's Periodic Table (1955)
1955     Mazurs' 1955 Formulation
1958     Mazurs' 1958-73 Formulation
1960     Theodor Benfey's Spiral Periodic Table
1960     Spherical Periodic Table
1960     Pauling's Complete Electronegativity Scale
1961     Gamow's Wound Ribbon Periodic Table
1961     Chaverri's Tabla Periodica de Los Elementos
1963     Life Science Library Periodic Table
1964     Eichinger Periodic Table
1964     Samuel Ruben Periodic Table
1965     Alexander Arrangement of Elements
1965     Giguère's Periodic Table
1965     Mazurs' 1965 Formulation
1965     Dutch Periodic Table
1966     Ionization Enerties
1966     Cotton and Wilkinson Periodic Table of The Elements
1967     Elements of The Standard Model
1967     Mazurs' 1967 Formulation
1967     Sanderson's Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements
1967     Mazurs' other 1967 Formulation
1967     Mazurs' another 1967 Formulation
1968     Merck Index Periodic Chart of The Elements
1969     Glen T. Seaborg's g-Block Formulation
1969     Wikipedia Extended Periodic Table
1969     Island of Stability
1969     Mazurs Periodic System of Chemical Elements
1969     van Spronsen Periodic Table
1970     Monument to the Periodic Table
1970     Elements According to Relative Abundance
1971     Satz Reciprocal System Periodic Table
1971     Clark, John O. E. Periodic Table
1972     Octagonal Prismatic Periodic Table
1974     Mazurs Version of Janet's "Lemniscate" Formulation
1974     Marzus Wooden Version of Mendeleev's Periodic Table
1974     Mazurs' PT Formulation Analysis
1975     Hyde's Periodic Relationships of The Elements
1975     Russian Periodic Table(s)
1975     Hyde's Periodic Relationships of The Elements (updated)
1977     CRC Handbook Periodic Table of The Elements
1977     Ambrosis' Clasification Periodica de los Elementos
1979     Mann's Spiral Periodic Table
1980     Periodic RoundTable
1982     Periodiska Systems Rätta Form
1983     Cement Chemists Cubic Periodic Table
1983     Pyramid Periodic Table
1985     Jodogne's Tableau des Éléments
1988     San Le's Periodic Table
1989     Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table
1989     Electron Shell Periodic Table
1989     Laing's Modification of The Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements
1990     Dufour's Periodic Tree
1990     Pawlowski Circular Periodic Table
1990     Circular Model of the Atom: Opposition in the Elements
1994     Where Should Aluminium Go?
1995     Chemical Helix Periodic Table
1995     Melinda Green's Periodic Fractal of The Elements
1996     First Ionisation Energy of The Elements
1997     Eric Scerri's Bayley-Thomsen-Bohr Periodic Table
1997     Bob Doyle Periodic Table of The Elements
1997     G.O.O.D. Periodic Table of The Elements
1998     Wheel of Motion Periodic Table
1999     Moran's Spiral Periodic Table


1950

The Modern Periodic Table

The modern periodic table is based on quantum numbers and blocks, here.

A periodic table can be constructed by listing the elements by n and l quantum number:

The problem with this mapping is that the generated sequence is not continuous with respect to atomic number atomic number, Z: Check out the sequence Ar to K, 18 to 19.

Named after a French chemist who first published in the formulation in 1929, the Janet or Left-Step Periodic Table uses a slightly different mapping:

While the Janet periodic table is very logical and clear it does not separate metals from non-metals as well as the Mendeleev version, and helium is a problem chemically.

However, it is a simple mapping to go from the Janet or Left-Step periodic table to a modern formulation of Mendeleev's periodic table:

 

On this page web, "full" f-block included periodic tables are shown wherever possible, as above.

However, the periodic table is usually exhibited in book and on posters in a compressed form with the f-block "rare earths" separated away from the s-block, p-block and d-block elements:

However, the compression used introduces the well known problem known as a "fence post error".

The effect is that:

La and Ac: move from f-block to d-block
Lu and Lr: move from p-block to f-block

Chemically, the elements can be fitted in and classified either way. Many thanks to JD for pointing the situation with the periodic table is a fence post error.

Mark Winter's Web Elements project, here, uses the formulation shown below:

Interestingly, the IUPAC periodic table separates out 15 lanthanides, La-Lu, and 15 actinides, Ac-Lr by leaving gaps in period 3 under Sc & Y:

This corresponds to:

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1950

Clark's Updated Periodic Table

John D Clark's 1950 chart. It looks as though the experience of producing the 1949 version for Life Magazine caused him to have a radical rethink. John D. Clark, A modern periodic chart of chemical elements. Science,111, 661-663 (1950). Information supplied by Philip Stewart.

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1950

Scheele's System

Scheele's system of 1950 (from van Spronsen):

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1950

Elements Known in the Year 1950

Elements known in the year 1950, taken from this Wikipedia page:

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1951

Longman's Mural from Festival of Britain

Edgar Longman's mural from the 1951 Festival of Britain Science Exhibition, restored by Philip Stewart:

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1951

Chicago Museum of Science & Industry Periodic Table

Periodic Table of Elements - Ca. 1950's - The ninety-two elements are here arrayed in colorful and orderly fashion. These "building blocks of the universe" stand beneath the great central dome of the Museum.

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1951

Rodríguez Tabla Periódica de los Elementos Químicos

Spanish to English translation from here.

Click here to see a larger version.

Originally published: Tabla Periódica de los Elementos. Journal of Chemical Education, 30:632:1951

"The arrangement of the Periodic Table of the Elements according to Gil Chaverri mainly takes into account the electronic structure of an element in determining the element's position in the table. It takes into account the different periods of elements have different length, because the first is of two elements, then followed by two periods of eight elements each, then two periods of 18 elements each, then a period of thirty-two elements and finally a seventh period incomplete.

"The table takes into account the important fact that, despite the variable length, the first two elements and the last six items in each period respectively have similar properties, forming the eight groups or columns of representative elements with similar chemical properties. The elements that constitute the Series Transition and Rare Earth Series are arranged in rows, in locations that correspond to how energy sublevels are filled that characterize these elements. Each element corresponds to a specific place and only in a box in the table, with no need to drop items off the table, at the foot of it, as in previous arrangements.

"With the information provided by the Board, you can deduce the electronic structure of a component, from its placement on the table, except the few cases that have small irregularities. In general, the Table is a settlement based on the electronic structure of chemical elements and this criterion determines its position in the array.":

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1951

Mellor's Periodic Series of the Elements

Mellor's periodic series of the elements lists the rare earths as a vertical column below Y in Group III. Element Z=61, is identified as Il, illinium.

The peculiarities of Ce, Eu, Tb and Yb are not evident. U is positioned below W emphasizing its 6+ oxidation state.

From Michael Laing's paper: A Revised Periodic Table with the Lanthanides Repositioned, Found. Chem. (2005) 7: 203–233

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1951

Tomkeieff's Periodic Table Formulation Formula

A short letter to Nature in which Tomkeieff gives a formula to generate the periodic table:

Phobia

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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1953

Mendoza Periodic Table

A paper (PDF here) titled "Generic Laws of The Chemical Elements: A New Periodic System" by the Peruvian Oswaldo Baca Mendoza. Click here for a large version:

<Mendoza Periodic Table>

Mendoza Periodic Table

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1954

Sanderson's "One More" Periodic Table

From Sanderson's paper: One More Periodic Table (J. Chem. Educ., 1954, 31 (9), p 481):

Kabbalistic

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1955

Mazurs' Valence Periodic Table

In his 1974 book Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press (2nd edition) Edward G. Mazurs presents a valence periodic table. He classifies this as a Subtype IIIC3-6a formulation:

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1955

Mazurs' Valence Periodic Table

In his 1974 book Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press (2nd edition) Edward G. Mazurs presents a periodic table he classifies as a Subtype IIIC3-6b formulation:

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1955

Krafft's Periodic Table (1955)

From The Ether and Its Vortices, p. 63, Carl Frederick Krafft

Thanks to Edmond Maurice Peyroux for the tip!

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1955

Mazurs' 1955 Formulation

From Edward G. Mazurs' 1974 (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press:

Mazurs 1955

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1958

Mazurs' 1958-73 Formulation

From Edward G. Mazurs' 1974 (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press:

Mazurs 1958-73

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1960

Spiral Periodic Table by Theodor Benfey

Spiral Periodic Table by Theodor Benfey, click here for a live web version.

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1960

Spherical Periodic Table

Unfortunately, this wonderful formulation from a Union Carbide advertisement (1960) does not work; it is not (in this author's opinion) possible to wrap the PT onto a sphere:

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1960

Pauling's Complete Electronegativity Scale

From The Nature of The Chemical Bond, 3rd Ed, pp 93, Pauling gives a periodic table showing the electronegativity of the elements.

Notice how the d block appears between groups 3 and 4 (13 & 14), rather than between groups 2 and 3 (2 & 13):

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1961

Gamow's Wound Ribbon Periodic Table

From George Gamow's 1961 book, The Atom and Its Nucleus:

Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip!

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1961

Chaverri's Tabla Periodica de Los Elementos

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1963

Life Science Library Periodic Table

An periodic table in the Life Science Library book, Matter, by Ralph E. Lapp (1963).

The PT is arranged vertically instead of having the usual horizontal format. It is also probably the first book to show pictures of nearly every element, arranged by family:

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1964

Eichinger Periodic Table

A 1964 photograph of Dr Jack Eichinger of Florida State Univ with his Periodic Table:

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1964

Samuel Ruben Periodic Table

An interesting periodic table from 1964, found at an estate sale. The text says that the elements are: "arranged according to the atomic number Z and column relation to the rare gases", and is by Samuel Ruben (wikipedia).

Click here to see the full size version.

Samuel Ruben Periodic Table

Samuel Ruben Spiral

Thanks to Rachel Helling for the tip!

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1965

Alexander Arrangement of Elements

The Alexander Arrangement of Elements is a 3D periodic table concept based on strict adherence to the Periodic Law, and, like the first representation of elements in periods by de Chancourtois, connects every element data box in unbroken order.

Roy Alexander, a Brooklyn born science museum exhibit and teaching aid designer, has told me in a personal communication: "I came up with the idea (being ignorant of anything but the flat Sargent Welch charts) in 1965. I wasn't able to patent [the downslant in the p-block] until 1971." (U.S.Patent #3,581,409)

At the time Roy had no idea that others had employed a similar technique to build a 3D table – including the very first periodic table developer, de Chancourtois, who is often credited with being the original discoverer of the periodicity of elements and the originator of the three-dimensional method of element arrangement and representation.

These 3D forms attempt to return the Seaborg separated f–block to its proper position in the table rather than remaining exiled. This, and contemporary attitudes about Hydrogen as being in more families than one – is uniquely addressed in Roy's 3D models.

Subsequent study of the Periodic Law and the periodic table's value in education convinced Roy that the basic rationale for developing the Alexander Arrangement of Elements was only one of the many good reasons for producing it for the public to share, so he sought and was granted a U.S. patent on the p-block downslant in order to manufacture and market the AAEs as teaching/learning aids.

Roy Alexander's goal of introducing the AAE into classrooms, laboratories, chemistry textbooks, and reference material remains the same today, but rather than replacing the conventional charts, its niche in education is at the very point that a lesson on arrangement of atoms into a chart begins. Element sequencing (vs. 24 breaks/gaps) credits the chart as well as the Periodic Law, which establishes subsequent confidence in the common flat charts, much as the world globe establishes the reality, and flat printed projections - maps - are vital (and relished) for convenience.

The first commercial production of Alexander Arrangements was in 1995, when Roy pioneered by constructing a website - periodictable.com - for marketing. Three versions were printed: two versions for student entry of element symbols, the larger die-cut for easier assembly.

An even larger model was produced with basic element data printed in the boxes, also die cut. These were printed on white card stock, with black ink.

Another version (below) was produced in conjunction with ATMI's annual report in 2000. This was added to Roy's product offerings, called the DeskTopper, and is still available. They are die cut to form a 7.25" high model with the f-block position attached after La, but can be altered to put La on the f-block. (See AAE Features at the top of this page.)

Besides the hands-on educational application, the DeskTopper can be used as a pen & pencil caddy, and flattened without losing the continuity of the element data. This flattened form has suggested design of a Braille periodic table of the same format, and this is also being pursued.

Marketing the Alexander Arrangements was moved to AllPeriodicTables.com in cooperation with Theodore Gray in 2006, who purchased the PeriodicTable.com domain name and funded the production of Roy's newest model, illustrated with Theo's amazing element photos.

For the first time, the elements beyond those naturally occurring have been omitted from a modern periodic table, simplifying initiation to chemistry. This factor denies the concept of obsolescence, and this version has been called the Forever Periodic Table. Details of this new 3D periodic table model kit have been placed at 3DPeriodicTable.com.

Further AAE information and images may be found at the Alexander Arrangement website.

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1965

Giguère's Periodic Table

Paul Giguère's Periodic Table formulation, from here:

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1965

Mazurs' 1965 Formulation

From Edward G. Mazurs' 1974 (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press:

Mazurs 1965

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1965

Dutch Periodic Table

A Dutch periodic table formulation, Periodiek Systeem van de Elementen, probably from the mid-nineteen sixties: Element 103 Lr (shown as Lw), discovered 1961, is listed but Rf 104, discovered in 1964 is not shown.

Note how this formulation shows the noble gases, He-Rn, both on the left-side and the right-side.

This historic and original periodic table is listed for sale (Nov. 2015) on the Not On The Hight Street website.

Dutch Periodic Table

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1966

Periodic Table of Ions

From Concept of Chemical Periodicity: from Mendeleev Table to Molecular Hyper-Periodicity Patterns E. V. Babaev and Ray Hefferlin, here.

"One intriguing problem that arises from with the periodic table of atoms is the possibility of constructing periodic systems of ions, V. K. Grigorovich, Periodic Law of Mendeleev and Electronic Structure of Metals, Nauka Publ.: Moscow, 1966 (in Russian). An atom can be completely or partially ionized to a cation by removing electrons or transformed into an anion by the addition of new electrons. The energy required for a few consecutive ionisations of atoms is plotted against the atomic number. One can see that the curves are periodic, and hence it is possible to construct periodic tables for mono-, di-, and multi- charged cations. If we look at the dispositions of the maxima and minima of the curves and compare them with those for atoms, it becomes evident that the magic numbers of electrons for ions are the same as for neutral atoms. Therefore, the number of electrons (but not the charge of the nucleus) is responsible for the periodicity of ions."

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1966

Cotton and Wilkinson Periodic Table of The Elements

From the Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 2nd Ed. textbook by Cotton and Wilkinson:

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1967

Elements of The Standard Model

The first step towards the Standard Model of particle physics was Glashow's 1960 discovery of a way to combine the electromagnetic and weak interactions. In 1967, Weinberg & Salam incorporated the Higgs mechanism, giving the standard model its modern form of: quarks leptons and bosons.

These diagrams are the periodic tables of elementry particle physics:

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1967

Mazurs' 1967 Formulation

From the front cover of Edward G. Mazurs' 1974 (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press:

Mazurs 1955

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1967

Sanderson's Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements

Sanderson's 1967 formulation has both the d-block elements and the f-block elements totally removed from the body of the table thus allowing the elements in the Major Groups of Periods 4, 5 and 6 to be grouped with the "typical" elements of Periods 2 and 3.

The Inner Transition elements are from Ce to Yb, i.e., in this ‘‘Rational’’ arrangement there are only thirteen lanthanide metals.

From Michael Laing's paper: A Revised Periodic Table with the Lanthanides Repositioned, Found. Chem. (2005) 7: 203–233

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1967

Mazurs' other 1967 Formulation

From Edward G. Mazurs' 1974 (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press:

Mazurs 1967

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1967

Mazurs' another 1967 Formulation

From Edward G. Mazurs' 1974 (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press.

This formulation is the basis of Philip Stewart's Janet Rajeuni:

Mazurs 1967

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1968

Merck Index Periodic Chart of The Elements

From the 8th Edition of the Merck Index:

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1969

Glen T. Seaborg's g-Block Formulation

An long periodic table – developed by Glenn T. Seaborg in 1969 – containing the yet-to-be-discovered g-block elements can be constructed. For the full version and discussion, go to Jeries Rihani's pages, here and here.

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1969

Wikipedia Extended Periodic Table

There is an extended Seaborg periodic Table on Wikipedia, here:

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1969

Island of Stability

From Wikipedia: The island of stability in nuclear physics describes a set of as-yet undiscovered isotopes of transuranium elements which are theorized to be much more stable than others. The possibility was proposed by Glenn T. Seaborg in the late 1960s: Prospectd for Further Considerable Extension of the Periodic Table, J.Chem.Educ., 46, 626-633 (1969) and reprinted in Modern Alchemy: Selected Papers of Glenn T. Seaborg (1994).

The hypothesis is that the atomic nucleus is built up in "shells" in a manner similar to the structure of the much larger electron shells in atoms. In both cases, shells are just groups of quantum energy levels that are relatively close to each other.

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1969

Mazurs Periodic System of Chemical Elements

A foldout from the Mazurs book, Graphical Representations of The Periodic System During 100 Years.

Mazurs said he drew it in 1967 and published it in 1969: ref. E Mazurs, A new numeration of periods in the periodic system and the Kessler Principle for the construction of the periodic table, Canad. Chem. Edu. 4(3), 21-23, 1969.

It is a Janet's modified system to show the irregularities – Lu, Cr, Pd etc. Click here for a larger version:

Mazurs PT

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1969

van Spronsen Periodic Table

From the van Spronsen book, The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years:

van Spronsen

Thanks to Philip Stewart for the tip!

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1970

Monument to the Periodic Table

Monument to the periodic table, in front of the Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology of the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia. The monument honors Dmitri Mendeleev, and is by the artist Karol  Lacko, academic sculptor born in 1938 in Spišská Noá Ves,  and who died in 2007. (Many thanks to Fathi Habashi for finding this information.)

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1970

Elements According to Relative Abundance

A 1970 periodic table by Prof. Wm. F. Sheehan of the University of Santa Clara that claims to show the elements according to relative abundance at the Earth's surface.

Click here to see the full size version with a little more text:

 

However, this author disputes the relative areas given to the various elements; there is almost no helium at the Earth's surface, for example.

Below is a conventional PT representation of the relative abundance of the elements in the Earth's crust taken from Mark Winter's WebElements website:

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1971

Satz Reciprocal System Periodic Table

Developed in 1971 for my book The Unmysterious Universe, this periodic table is based on Dewey B. Larson's Reciprocal System of theory. The numbers below the symbols indicate the rotational displacement (spin numbers) of the atoms.  The Roman numerals indicated divisions; the rows, 1B to 4B, are referred to as "groups" rather than as "periods."  Note that we have the same trouble positioning hydrogen as does everyone else; here, I've put it over both the alkali metals and the halogens, because it acts both as electropositive (e.g., with respect to water) and electronegative (with respect to carbon).

Click here for larger PDF file.

Ronald W. Satz, Ph.D.
Transpower Corporation
www.transpowercorp.com
transpower.wordpress.com
transpower@aol.com

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1971

Clark, John O. E. Periodic Table

Thanks to René Vernon who found this formulation, and writes:

"Here's a strange table I found in the following book: Clark Jonh O.E. 1982, Chemistry (The Hamlyn Publishing Group, Feltham, Middlesex) ISBN 0600001245. The colour coding is exasperating. The way the table is laid out is bizarre. The copy I have is a reprint of the original 1971 edition so I have to wonder if the graphic designer was drawing inspiration from the trippy 60s."

Clock PT

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1972

Octagonal Prismatic Periodic Table

In the Journal of Chemical Education (1972), Tang Wah Kow of New Method College Hong Kong, presents an octagonal prismatic periodic table:

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1974

Mazurs Version of Janet's "Lemniscate" Formulation

Janet’s lemniscate formulation periodic table as modified by E.G. Mazur in his Graphic Representations of the Periodic System during One Hundred Years (1974), cited in Punyashloke Mishra’s The Role of Abstraction in Scientific Illustration: Implications for Pedagogy (1999) republished in Carolyn Handa’s Visual Rhetoric in a Digital World: A Critical Sourcebook", from the Island94 blog, here:

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1974

Marzus Wooden Version of Mendeleev's Periodic Table

There is a posting in the The Elements Unearthed blog by David V Black concerning a view of the Marzus archive:

"My biggest discovery this week has been a collection in our archives of the notes of Edward Mazurs, who wrote the definitive work on classifying different systems of periodic tables in 1957 with a revised edition in 1974 (Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press). He collected articles and wrote extensive, detailed notes on every version of the periodic table he could find as it developed from its start in the early 1860s with the work of de Chancourtois through 1974. All of those notes have been donated to Chemical Heritage Foundation and fill up ten binders, with meticulous drawings, charts, tables, and frequent additions and changes. There are also some pieces of the original artwork prepared for the book, and a wooden model of the periodic table Mazurs built himself. "

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1974

Mazurs' PT Formulation Analysis

In his 1974 book Edward G. Mazurs (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press gives a comprehensive analysis of periodic table formulations.

Mazurs identifies most PT formulations as being:

  • Spiral
  • Plane lemniscate
  • Concentric circles
  • Helix on a cylinder
  • Helix on a cone
  • Space lemniscate
  • Space concentric circles

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1975

Hyde's Periodic Relationships of The Elements

J. Franklin Hyde was an industrual chemist. His PT formulation is available from the Gelest website:

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1975

Russian Periodic Table(s)

Eric Scerri writes:

"The periodic tables [below], and data, are from some Russian books given to me by the late Ray Hefferlin, when I visited him a few years ago in Tennessee. Sorry, I can't give any source details as the inserts got separated from the book."

The captions say: "Fig. XVII. Block-type periodic table" and "U.L.Kulakov, Classification of the chemical elements on the new background".

Looking at the graphics style, we are guessing they date from the mid-1970s (MRL)

Courtines 3D PT

Courtines PT

Courtines classification

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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1975

Hyde's Periodic Relationships of The Elements (updated)

I received an email from Jeremy Sachs saying:

"Gelest don't seem to offer [this periodic table formulation] anymore, and because their version heavily modifies Hyde's original table, I've reproduced the 1975 version of his table with the permission of his surviving relatives."

Click here to see the full size version.

Hyde's Periodic Relationships of The Elements (updated)

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1977

CRC Handbook Periodic Table of The Elements

From the 58th Edition of the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics:

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1977

Ambrosis' Clasification Periodica de los Elementos

By Dr Raúl Julio Ambrosis, who taught Chemistry at the National University of La Plata in Argentina. The source is the Clasificación Periódica de los Elementos, Buenos Aires, Ediciones Marymar, 1977.

Click here for the full size version:

Ambrosis PT

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1979

Mann's Spiral Periodic Table

From AT Mann:

"I designed a spiral periodic table which was published first in my book The Divine Plot: Astrology, Reincarnation, Cosmology and History (George Allen & Unwin, London, 1986) which attempts to correlate the PT with astrological understanding of the inherent properties of the signs and planets":

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1980

Periodic RoundTable

Gary Katz says: "The Periodic RoundTable is a unique three-dimensional model of the Periodic Table, an elegant spatial arrangement of the chemical elements that is both symmetrical and mathematical. It is the ultimate refinement of Mendeleev's scheme, one that will take us into the twenty-first century and beyond. The Periodic RoundTable possesses such a high degree of order because it is based exclusively on the system of ideal electronic configuration, which in turn is the basis of periodicity among the elements. In the Periodic RoundTable the electron shells are filled in the same order as the elements themselves appear, demonstrating a holistic relationship between the chemistry of the elements and the orbital descriptions of their electrons."

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1982

Periodiska Systems Rätta Form

Hanno Essén's Periodiska Systems Rätta formulation of the Periodic Table, published in the International Journal of Quantum Chemistry vol. XXI pp.717-726 (1982).

Essén's formulation is a variant of the Janet Left-Step formulation of 1928:

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1983

Cement Chemists Cubic Periodic Table (Model)

Click here for large image.

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1983

Pyramid Periodic Table (Model)

Click here for large image.

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1985

Jodogne's Tableau des Éléments

Jean-Claude Jodogne's Tableau des Éléments. Click here for a full size version:

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1988

San Le's Periodic Table

Click here for the full size version, and here for a discussion about this formulation.

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1989

Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table

The Physicist's Periodic Table by Timothy Stowe is a well know formulation for those interested in such things, but for a long time its origin was been lost. Eric Scerri has rediscovered the original formulation: a 1989 publication by the company Instruments Research and Industry (I2R) Inc:



 

From Wikipedia, this Stowe Format Periodic Table is Based on a graphic from Scholten J."Secret Lanthanides", 2005, ISBN 90-74817-16-5;

Eric Scerri has developed an updated version of the Stowe formulation, here.

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1989

Electron Shell Periodic Table

A modified form of a periodic table showing known and predicted electron shells.

From G.T. Seaborg, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1989. From the Encyclopedia Britanica website:

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1989

Laing's Modification of The Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements

Laing's modification of the periodic table. This arrangement has the lanthanide series (La to Lu) deliberately aligned with La below Y in Group 3 and with Ce below Zr in Group 4.

This places Pm below Tc, thus linking their common non-existence in Nature.

From Michael Laing's paper: A Revised Periodic Table with the Lanthanides Repositioned, Found. Chem. (2005) 7: 203–233

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1990

Dufour's Periodic Tree

The Dufour Periodictree periodic table formulation, from here:

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1990

Pawlowski Circular Periodic Table

On John Pratt's website there is an article that is both an introduction to Helen Pawlowski's model of the atom and to her Circular Periodic Table, as well as a book review of her book The Visualization of the Atom (Riverton, UT: Pawlowski Family Trust, 1990). First Helen and her work are introduced, then the model's strengths and weaknesses are summarized:

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1990

Circular Model of the Atom: Opposition in the Elements

The Circular Model of the Atom is a circular periodic table that shows atomic structure in addition to periodicity. Unlike any other periodic table or model, it demonstrates that the atomic structure has an inherent dipole magnet that create positve and negative fields and elemental qualities at the atomic level.

The Circular Model of the Atom was created by Helen A. Pawlowski in the 1980s, and published in her work, Visualization of the Atom.

Her brother, Paul A. Williams extended many of Helen's ideas with his examination of the standard model using Helen's Circular Atom Model. This website contains some of Helen's ideas and Paul's writings.

Circular Model of the Atom: Opposition in the Elements

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1994

Where Should Aluminium Go?

Fathi Habashi aruges in Chemistry in Education (1994) that aluminium, Al, should be placed above scandium and next to magnesium. There is more information about this formulation here:

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1995

Helical Periodic Table

Tarquin Publications sell a make-your-own three dimensional, helical periodic table.

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1995

Melinda Green's Periodic Fractal of The Elements

Melinda Green writes: "This is an alternative version of the standard chemistry Periodic Table of the Elements that I developed. In high school I learned the basic concept of element families and how they were arranged into columns to show the periodicity in their electrical properties. I was fascinated with the idea, but immediately wondered whether there might be better ways of graphically showing those relationships." read lots more here

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1996

First Ionisation Energy of The Elements

Periodic trend for ionization energy, for example Mg → Mg+ + e

Each period begins at a minimum for the alkali metals, and ends at a maximum for the noble gases. From Wikipedia:

Based on data from: Martin, W. C.; Wiese, W. L. (1996). Atomic, Molecular, & Optical Physics Handbook. American Institute of Physics. ISBN 156396242X.

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1997

Bayley-Thomsen-Bohr Periodic Table

A formulation adapted by Eric Scerri from tables developed by Thomas Bayley, Jørgen Thomsen and Neils Bohr that depicts the symmetrical nature of the periodic law.

Eric Scerri, The Evolution of the Periodic System, American Scientist, November-December issue, 1997, 546-553

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1997

Bob Doyle Periodic Table of The Elements

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1997

Good Periodic Table of The Elements

From the Good Periodic Table website:

"The Geometric Organisation Of Dimension, aka 'G.O.O.D', Periodic Tables primary function acts as an identifier of relationships between like particles of matter. This operates utilising the original Sample process first discovered by Mendeleev; were atoms that are linked in a straight line hold a unique relationship as compared to the rest of the atoms on the table."

 

Good

Good

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1998

Wheel of Motion Periodic Table

The Wheel of Motion (WoM) representation of the periodic table of elements shows the periodic nature of the elements, as developed in the Reciprocal System of Physical Theory (RST).

It was originally developed by Douglas Bundy in 1998, a member of the International Society of Unified Science (ISUS). 

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1999

Moran's Spiral Periodic Table

Jeoff Moran's spiral periodic table can be found at periodicspiral.com.

See an article in the New York Times:

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pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

 

 


Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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