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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

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Periodic Table formulations from the year 1926:

1926   Antropoff's Periodic Table
1926   Monroe & Turner's Spiral
1926   Russell's Periodic Chart of The Elements 1
1926   Russell's Periodic Chart of The Elements 2
1926   Hopkins' Nearly Completed Periodic Table of The Elements
1926   Friend's Periodic Table (1926)


1926

Antropoff's Periodic Table

The Andreas von Antropoff periodic table, restored by Philip Stewart on the basis of the article 'Eine neue Form des periodischen Systems der Elementen'. Zeitschrift für angewandte Chemie 39, pp. 722-725, 1926:

This formulation has a satisfying balance compared to most other tables and was the most popular wall-chart in German schools for many years but quickly disappeared after von Antropoff was disgraced in 1945 for his Nazi activities: he presided over the raising of the swastika over Bonn University in 1933. But he put science above politics and was a stout defender of Einstein's theories.

A recently restored wall version of the von Antropoff formulation from the University of Barcelona, origionally painted in 1934 (thanks to Philip Stewart & Claudi Mans):

 

Perhaps it was the disgrace of von Antropoff which led Linus Pauling to borrow his design, without acknowledgement, for his 1949 book, General Chemistry (and subsequently in later editions of The Chemical Bond).

The PT below is scanned in from Pauling's The Nature of The Chemical Bond, 3rd ed., 1960:

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1926

Monroe & Turner's Spiral

Monroe and Turner's spiral, in which they correctly place the actinides. Information supplied by Philip Stewart.

Ref. is C J Monroe and W D Turner A new Periodic Table of the Elements, J Chem Ed, 3, 1058-65, 1926

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1926

Walter Russell's Periodic Chart of The Elements 1

Walter Russell's Periodic Chart of The Elements 1. View other formulations and an interview here:

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1926

Walter Russell's Periodic Chart of The Elements 2

Walter Russell's Periodic Chart of The Elements 2. View other formulations and an interview here:

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1926

Hopkins' Nearly Completed Periodic Table of The Elements

From a Scientific American of March 1927, an article by B.S. Hopkins discussing the building blocks of the universe.

Included is The Nearly Completed [Hubbard Type] Periodic Table of the Elements from 1926.

As Eric Scerri pointed out: "Notice element, 43, masurium, according to Noddack, Noddack and Berg, and later synthesized as Tc":

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1926

Friend's Periodic Table (1926)

Vallance RH & Eldridge AA, A Text-Book of Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. VII, Part III, Chromium and its Congeners, JN Friend (ed.) Charles Griffin & Company, London (1926), front paper.

René Vernon (who found this formulation) writes:

"I can't recall seeing a table in which the lanthanoids were allocated in quite such a manner: across seven groups. And, 16 such lanthanoids shown. Even curiouser, Argon = A; xenon = X; are shown in group 0. Wonderful nomenclature from nearly a century ago."

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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