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pre 1900 formulations
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non-chemistry periodic tables
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2019 has been designated the International Year of the Periodic Table as it is the 150th Anniversary of the formulation of Mendeleev's Tabelle I

Internet Database of Periodic Tables


There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Dr Mark R Leach.

Use the buttons below to select from the 1000+ Periodic Tables in the database:

pre 1900 formulations 1900 to 1949 formulations 1950 to 1999 formulations 2000 to 2009 formulations Spiral formulations 3 dimensional formulations
Data mapping periodic tables Miscellaneous periodic tables Books and reviews non-chemistry periodic tables All periodic tables

Or, select:     Search by Year:      Text search:



Miscellaneous Periodic Table formulations:

2012     3 Year-Old Sings Tom Lehrer's Elements Song
2010     3-D Strange Periodic Table
2012     94 Elements: The Stuff of Everything
2016     Alchemical Table of Symbols
2019     Archetypes of Periodic Law
2015     Art of The Elements
2017     Atomic Nuclei Periodic Table
2012     Atoms, Orbitals & The Periodic Table
2011     BASF Periodic Table
2018     Better Call Saul - Gale sings The Elements
2004     Biologist's Periodic Table
2019     Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue: The Elements
2008     Braille Guidebook Interactive Periodic Table Study Set
2013     Breaking Bad Periodic Table
2014     Breaking Bad Periodic Table
2015     Brielle, 3 Years Old, Recites The Periodic Table of Elements!
2012     Building Block Elements
2007     Bus Periodic Table
2011     Cartoon about The Elements
2019     Celebrate 150 Years Of The Periodic Table By Tying 200,000 Tiny Knots
1992     Chemical Slide Rules
2016     Chemistry Eye Chart
1993     Chemistry Imagined: The Periodic Table
2012     chemoDoku
2012     Chemoline Shop
2002     Chinese Character Periodic Tables
2015     Chinese Names of the Chemical Elements
2010     Circlon Model of Nuclear Structure & Periodic Table
2010     Classical Periodic Table
2014     Clock Periodic Table
2017     Clock Prism Periodic Table, Braille Version
2012     Coat of Arms Periodic Table
2014     Coffee Table, Periodic Table Table
2004     Cognitive Classroom's Periodic Table of Atoms
2016     Collective Work of Chemists
2010     Compilation of Minimum and Maximum Isotope Ratios of Selected Elements
2002     Corning Museum of Glass Periodic Table
2014     Correspondences Between The Classical Thomson Problem and The Periodic Table of The Elements
2009     Crab Periodic Table
2012     Cupcakes, Periodic Table
2014     Cutting Board Periodic Table
1831     Daubeny's Teaching Display Board & Wooden Cubes of Atomic Weights
2007     Death Metal Periodic Table
2013     Don't Trust Atoms...
2011     Dufour's Periodic Tree: Two Short Films
2004     Electron Overjump Periodic Table
2011     Element Game
1955     Element Hunters
2019     Element Scarcity, Periodic Table of
1970     Elements According to Relative Abundance
2003     Elements by Orbital
2011     Elements in Bottles Periodic Table
1967     Elements of The Standard Model
1959     Elements Song by Tom Lehrer
2011     Elements Song by Tom Lehrer Periodic Table
2016     Elements Song Updated by Helen Arney
2003     Elephant Periodic Table
2009     Enkana's Periodic Table
2012     Eric Scerri.com
2007     Extending the Periodic Table
2008     f--l--A--r--k's Fractal Periodic Table
1996     First Ionisation Energy of The Elements
2019     Frog Periodic Table
2001     Funny Periodic Table
2008     Google Image Search Periodic Table
2009     Graphic Representations of the Periodic System
1998     Gray's Wooden Periodic Table Table
2006     Group Numbering Systems
2001     Haiku Periodic Table
2017     Haiku, Elemental
2019     Heritage Periodic Table Display
2013     Higgs Boson and Fundamental Particle/Force Periodic Tables
2019     Homage to The Elements
2011     Homenatge Als Elements
2018     I Wear This Shirt Periodically T-Shirt
2010     Imaginary Elements Periodic Table
2008     Instruments, Periodic Table of
2019     International Year of the Periodic Table (in Paris and Moscow)
2019     International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri
1966     Ionization Enerties
2012     iPhone, Periodic Table of
2009     Jensen's In-Finite Form
2013     Joke
2001     Joke, Periodic Table
2012     JR's Chemistry Set
2010     Kabbalistic Periodic Table
2007     Kansas Periodic Table
2016     KAS Periodic Table
2010     Keaggy's Periodic Table of Periodic Tables
2010     Khipu or Quipu Periodic Table
2019     Kid's Periodic Table
2019     Knitted Blanket Periodic Table, In Time to Celebrate 150th Anniversary
2018     Lego® Periodic Table
1934     Leningrad Monument To The Periodic Table
2014     Letters & Words Periodic Table
2009     Leuven Periodic Table
2010     Lewis Octet Periodic Table
2019     Möbius-Escher Periodic Table
1944     Müller's Tree System
2012     Magnetic Periodic Table
2012     Mathematical Expression of Mendeleev's Periodic Law
1974     Mazurs' PT Formulation Analysis
2009     Meet the Elements
1997     Memory Pegs Periodic Table
2019     Mendeleev 150
1891     Mendeleev's Properties of The Chemical Elements
1996     Metals in Medicine Periodic Table
2019     Meyer's NYT Graphic
2000     MIT Periodic Table Characters
2012     Mnemonic Periodic Table Song
2012     Mug Periodic Table
2018     Murov's Colours of the Elements
2013     Music Notes of Periodic Table
2018     Nawa's V.E.T. Periodic Table & Hourglass
2010     Neutronic Schema of the Elements
1991     Non-Scientist's Periodic Table
1936     Orbital Filling
2009     Orbitron Gallery of Atomic Orbitals
2018     Organic Chemist's Periodic Table (another one)
2005     Painting of The Elements
2010     Periodic Arch of The Elements
2018     Periodic Table Song (2018 UPDATE!)
2009     Periodic Table Table
2016     Philatelic Table of The Elements
2016     Pictures & Words
2005     Pictures, Periodic Table of
2018     Places of the Periodic Table
1984     Planiverse Periodic Table
2008     Polymer Periodic Table
2007     Postage Stamp Periodic Table from Spain
1975     Primo Levi's Elements
2015     Protein Complexes, Periodic Table of
2002     Protein Structure Periodic Table
2012     QR Coded Audio Periodic Table of the Elements
2019     Quantum Victoria Periodic Art
1908     Ramsay's Periodic Table
2007     Rap Periodic Table by NOVI NOV
2011     Rapping the Elements
2010     Recipe For A Human Shirt
2016     Rejected Element Names, Periodic Table of
2007     Rock, Periodic Table of
2013     RSC Visual Elements Periodic Table: Alchemy
2009     Russian Periodic Table
2019     Schaltenbrand's Helical Gathering of the Elements
2010     Science Museum Lockers
2019     Scott Van Note Periodic Table Sculpture
1945     Segré Chart of Elements & Isotopes
2019     Setting The Table
2013     Shapes Periodic Table
2013     Simplest Periodic Table
1998     Simpsons Periodic Table
2000     Sistema Peryodico
2005     Smart Elements
2008     Snelson Atom
2013     Spectraphonic Periodic Table
2013     Spider Chart of The Periodic Table of Chemical Elements
2008     Spiral Periodic Table
2018     Stamps Commemorating Yuri Organeson
2013     Stardust Periodic Table of The Elements
2018     Superconductivity of Hydrides Periodic Table
2009     Sweater With Periodic Table
2014     Table Lab
2014     Table of Organic Chemicals and Their Smells
2017     Tetris Version of the Periodic Table
2008     Twin Vortex Theory
2013     Twitter Handle Periodic Table
2004     Two Hundred Languages
2010     UCL Lecturers, Periodic Table Of
2019     Ultimate Periodic Table by Goodfellow
2013     Underground Map of the Elements
2007     University of Jaén (Spain) Wall Mural Periodic Table
2017     University of Murcia's Oversize Periodic Table
2016     Valentine Periodic Table
2017     Venn Diagram of the Chemical Elements and the United States
2018     Waterloo Periodic Table Project/Projet Tableau Périodique
2014     Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony Periodic Table
2012     Wonderful Life with the Elements
2010     World's Smallest Periodic Table


2012

3 Year-Old Sings Tom Lehrer's Elements Song

Rose turned 3 in November. It's been a little over a year since her initial elements video.

She's still interested in elements, but not so much by playing the cards anymore, mostly via this song:

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2010

3-D Strange Periodic Table

As Lewis Page of The Register puts it: "Top flight international reverse-alchemy boffins say they have managed to transmute gold into an entirely new form of 'negatively strange' antihypernucleic antimatter...", here.

The effect is to add a third dimension of quark strangeness to the periodic table. Read the abstract by the STAR Collaboration.

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2012

94 Elements: The Stuff of Everything

There are 94 naturally occuring elements, from hydrogen to plutonium. Together they make up everything in the world.

94 Elements is a global filmmaking project, exploring our lives through the lens of the elements. Everything that surrounds us is made from these 94 building blocks, each with its own properties and personality. Our own bodies are mostly made from just 6 of them.

The stories of the elements are the stories of our own lives. They reveal the patterns of our economies and the state of our relationships with our natural resources. The project is in part a celebration of the art of documentary film and some of the best filmmakers working today are making new films for the project. There'll also be opportunities for talented new and emerging filmmakers and animators to pitch their own films, with the winners chosen by you - the project community.

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2016

Alchemical Table of Symbols

The Alchemical Table of Symbols was designed by Aristotle Pramagioulis of egregoredesign. The periodic table is available as a poster and many other forms:

Thanks to Fathi Habashi for the tip!

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2019

Archetypes of Periodic Law

Archetypes of Periodic Law by Dmitry Weise, read more on the website.

One of the creators of quantum mechanics Wolfgang Ernst Pauli wrote in his work The Influence of Archetypal Ideas on the Scientific Theories of Kepler (1948):

"The process of understanding nature as well as the happiness that man feels in understanding – that is, in the conscious realization or new knowledge – seems thus to be based on a correspondence, a 'matching' of inner images pre-existent in the human psyche with external objects and their behavior. This interpretation of scientific knowledge, of course, goes back to Plato and is, as we shall see, advocated very clearly by Kepler. These primary images, which the soul can perceive with the aid of an innate 'instinct', are called by Kepler archetypal. Their agreement with the 'primordial images' or archetypes introduced into modern psychology by C. G. Jung and functioning as 'instincts of imagination' is very extensive. A true spiritual descendant of the Pythagoreans, he attached the utmost importance to geometric claiming that its theorems 'have been in the spirit of God since eternity'. His basic principle was: 'Geometria est archetypus pulchritudinis mundi' (Geometry is the archetype of the beauty of the world)."

Dmitry writes:

"The key archetype, in our opinion, is the concept of the square and its gnomon. This is due to the well-known fact that the electron filled shell contains 2n2 electrons, and the number of electrons on the subshell is twice the odd number; the gnomon of the square. Triangle, tetrahedron, square pyramid, octahedron, pyramid-like figures composed of square layers are also considered. The methodical concept for these constructions is the figurate numbers, actively studied by the Pythagoreans. The tables of the periodic law built on the motifs of ancient folk and modern ornaments take a special place. They include not only geometric archetypes, but also magic-symbolic, cultural and religious archetypes of the collective unconscious. Note that the periodic law table, built on the basis of the Native American ornament, surpasses the modern Mendeleev table in the parameter reflecting quantum numbers in its structure."

Note the final photograph below shows Prof. Martyn Poliakoff of The University on Nottingham and Periodic Videos:

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2015

Art of The Elements

An Exhibition "Periodic Tales: The Art of the Elements", the Compton Verney Gallery, 3 October 2015 to 13 December 2015

"The iconic periodic table represents the ultimate expression of order, containing the volatile elements in rows and columns. This exhibition explores a selection of the elements drawn from the periodic table (neon, uranium, gold, silver, carbon, iron, copper, mercury, colbolt, aluminium, sulphur, bronze, tin, lead, calcium) and looks at how artists have used them and their cultural meanings in their art.

"Inside the exhibition you will experience the elements in unique and unexpected ways through historic and contemporary works by artists including Eduardo Paolozzi, Joseph Beuys, Joseph Wright of Derby, John Constable, Antony Gormley, Cornelia Parker, Marc Quinn, Lucy Skaer, Danny Lane, Bill Woodrow, Maria Lalic, Fiona Banner, Thomas Heatherwick, David Nash, Ken + Julia Yonetani and Roger Hiorns.

There are also two new commissions. A stunning neon work by Tim Etchells and a thoughtful carbon sculpture by Annie Cattrell."

The show is reviewed in New Scientist.



Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2017

Atomic Nuclei Periodic Table

From the Pyramids on Nuclei of Elements blog, a periodic table of atomic nuclei using 'pyramidal cube theory':

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2012

Atoms, Orbitals & The Periodic Table

One of several animations and explanations/realisations of quantum physics from Data-Burger, scientific advisor: J. Bobroff, with the support of: Univ. Paris Sud, SFP, Triangle de la Physique, PALM, Sciences à l'Ecole, ICAM-I2CAM.

Mark Leach writes:

"What I particularly like about this video is that it shows the quantum fuzziness of the atoms. This explains/shows how and why induced-dipole/induced-dipole (London force) interactions occur, an important class of van der Waals interaction. At any moment, the electron distribution is not perfectly spherical, which means that there is an instantaneous dipole on the atom. This instantaneous dipole is able to induce a dipole on an adjacent atom, with the effect that the two atoms are attracted when they touch. It is as if atoms are 'sticky' like Velcro.

"This effect explains why the Group 18 noble gas elements are able to form liquids and solids [not He] at low temperatures, and why non-polar molecules, such as P4, S8 and hydrocarbons are able to condense."

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2011

BASF Periodic Table

A BASF advert showing a periodic table of school children:

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2018

Better Call Saul - Gale sings The Elements

The Better Call Saul Season 4 Episode 3 Clip starring David Costabile singing The Elements Song:



Thanks to Conal for the tip!

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2004

Biologist's Periodic Tables

A periodic table showing where biologically essential (green), essential trace (purple), toxic (red), radioactive (yellow) and of low – but not zero– biological impact (gray) elements are found. Only highly toxic elements are shown in red. Li (as Li+) is biologically active and is used as an antidepressant.

By Mark Leach

or here:

 

And a periodic table for biologists from Science Videos:

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2019

Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue: The Elements

A Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue on The Elements.

Using state of the art [2019] web graphics, and packed with interesting business stories:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2008

Braille Guidebook Interactive Periodic Table Study Set

Azer's Interactive Periodic Table Study Set is designed to make learning about the Periodic Table of the Elements accessible to students with visual impairments or blindness.

The tangible materials included with this study set complement APH's Periodic Table of the Elements Reference Chart and allow students to enhance their understanding of concepts consistent with the National Science Standards.

Inspired by Samir Azer, a science teacher at the Kentucky School for the Blind, this set can assist in the instruction and demonstration of concepts related to the arrangement of the periodic table, atomic structure, ionic and covalent bonding, and balancing of chemical equations to students who benefit from a hands-on, interactive model.

Special attention was given to make the materials tactually discriminable and visually appealing to the target population, yet appropriate for all students regardless of visual acuity:

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2013

Breaking Bad Periodic Table

The TV series Breaking Bad uses Br (35) and Ba (56) in the logo, and Beutler Ink have constructed a full periodic table or characters and 'additional elements':

Breaking Bad Periodic Table

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2014

Breaking Bad Periodic Table

More Breaking Bad PT images:

Breaking Bad

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2015

Brielle, 3 Years Old, Recites The Periodic Table of Elements!

From Ellentube:

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2012

Building Block Elements

From Think Geek, element building blocks... so you can build your own PT Formulation:

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2007

Bus Periodic Table

A bus dressed as a Periodic Table used to advertise The Oxford Science Park:

And a Taxi:


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2011

Cartoon about The Elements

A cartoon about the elements from xkcd.com:

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2019

Celebrate 150 Years Of The Periodic Table By Tying 200,000 Tiny Knots

Jane Stewart decided to Celebrate 150 Years Of The Periodic Table By Tying 200,000 Tiny Knots:





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1992

Chemical Slide Rules

The first chemical slide rules are of interest here because they are, in effect, early periodic tables. But the are more than this, as they can be used for performing chemical calculations. Writing in Bull. Hist. Chem. 12 (1992) (and here), William D. Williams of Harding University writes:

"An article by George Bodner in the Winter 1990 issue of the Bulletin described a rare chemical slide rule designed by Lewis C. Beck and Joseph Henry - their little-known Improved Scale of Chemical Equivalents. [My] paper attempts to place this slide rule in context by describing its origins, as well as some of its predecessors and successors."

Some chemical slide rules mentioned in the text:

  • Wollaston's 1813/14 slide rule of chemical equivalents: here, here & here

Nagayasu Nawa writes and provides an explanation as how Wollaston's chemical equivalents slide rules should be used:

"It is very interesting slide rule for me. Because we actually used slide rule in 1960s. There were not the electronic calculator in the world. I think it would be used as a simple slide rule of The Law of Definite Proportions by J.L. Proust 1799."

  • '10 water', for example, may be hydrating water in chemical compound

  • 'Chlorine' may be HClO: HCl(35) + O(10) = HClO(45), etc.

Click image to enlarge:

Thanks to Nawa for the tip!

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2016

Chemistry Eye Chart

From Cascadia Press, an Eye Chart for Chemists:

Eye Chart

Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip!

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1993

Chemistry Imagined: The Periodic Table

From Roald Hoffmann & Vivian Torrence's book, Chemistry Imagined: Reflections of Science, a picture entitled The Periodic Table:



Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2012

chemoDoku

Chemoline an on-line shop, based in Germany with a multilingual site (click the flag), sells various science artifacts that feature the periodic table.

The site also has an on-line chemical element version of Sudoku called chemoDoku, click to play:

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2012

Chemoline Shop

Chemoline is an on-line shop, based in Germany with a multilingual site (click the flag).

The shop sells various science artifacts. Several products feature the periodic table, including:

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2002

Chinese Character Periodic Tables

Chinese character periodic tables, here, here & here:

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2015

Names of the Chemical Elements in Chinese

An interesting Language Log web page that discusses the chemical elements in chinese.

Names of the chemical elements in Chinese

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2010

Circlon Model of Nuclear Structure & Periodic Table

The complete nature and description of The Circlon Model of Nuclear Structure is contained in the book The Other Theory of Nuclear Physics available from www.living-universe.com. However, for the purpose of understanding nuclear structure it is only necessary to assume that the components of nuclear structure (protons, mesons, and neutrons) are all composed of hollow, ring-shaped, mechanical particles called Circlons that are held together within the nucleus by their physical shapes.

Within the nucleus, the proton and the meson are always connected in a two piece unit called a Promestone. The proton encircles the ring-shaped body of the meson, and the neutrons fit inside of the meson's hollow body and can only be located at four places within the meson's body called nucleon receptors. A proton is always located at one of a meson's nucleon receptors. One Promestone makes up the nucleus of a hydrogen-1 atom and two Promestones plus two neutrons make up the helium-4 nucleus, also know as an alpha particle. An element's atomic number indicates the number of Promestones in its nucleus and an isotope's atomic weight indicates the total number of Promestones and neutrons in that particular nucleus.

Within the alpha particle that forms the center of each nucleus, a proton and a neutron are located at each junction where the two mesons intersect. However, when two mesons cross in other parts of the nucleus, each intersection can contain only one proton or one neutron (see nitrogen model above).

In the nucleon models displayed in each of the element boxes of the periodic table, the protons are represented by white circles and the neutrons are represented by white stars. The mesons are represented by ovals which take the color of the element that is formed by their addition to the nucleus:

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2010

Classical Periodic Table

A periodic table of the classical elements: air, fire, earth, water & aether available as a t-shirt:

 

Or, just air, fire, earth, water, the 'old school' elements from here:

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2014

Clock Periodic Table

Prof. Martyn Poliakoff of the University of Nottingham, and star of the Periodic Videos YouTube Channel, explains how he was given a periodic table clock by a Japanese School teacher... which he likes very much:

Clock PT

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2017

Clock Prism Periodic Table, Braille Version

From the prolific Nagayasu Nawa, a Braille version of the Clock Prism periodic table:

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2012

Coat of Arms Periodic Table

Amy Gramour has created a version of the Periodic Table that presents a coat of arms for each element. The attributes of the coats of arms symbolize the electron configuration and other selected features of each element.

This PT is featured at Amy's website, www.amysmind2yourmind.com:

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2014

Coffee Table, Periodic Table Table

A Periodic Table Table - Coffee Table, from Bristol Design Forge via Folksy:

coffee table PT

coffee table PT

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2004

Cognitive Classroom's Periodic Table of Atoms

From Cognitive Classroom, a Periodic Table of Atoms. Richard Lambrecht writes:

"We have developed a visual periodic table that groups by orbitals, making He no longer contentious. But by including an orbital cloud, we give the student a great offset to the Bohr model used to place each and every single electron in the periodic table."

Click image or here to enlarge:

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2016

Collective Work of Chemists

From an article on LinkedIn:

Twelve elements were known from the Ancient Times, and were described by Romans and Greeks. The remaining 106 elements have been discovered by scientists of 15 different countries during the last 4 centuries. In addition, 19 elements of those 106 (18%) have been co-discovered by researchers of two countries.

Although some of them (like Bromine or Thallium) were isolated separately at the same time by chemists of different nationalities within the race to discover new elements in 18th-21st centuries, most of them have been obtained since then through collaborative research, like the recently discovered Ununpentium, Ununseptium and Ununoctium.

Another example is the isolation of Radium and Polonium by the Polish Maria Skłodowska-Curie and her French husband, Pierre Curie.

Thus, Periodic Table is the result of a collective and long-term work of hundreds of scientists.

It is noteworthy to see that Russia and United States have discovered mainly artificial elements.

Collective Work of Chemists

Collective Work of Chemists

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2010

Compilation of Minimum and Maximum Isotope Ratios of Selected Elements

Documented variations in the isotopic compositions of some chemical elements are responsible for expanded uncertainties in the standard atomic weights published by the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.

This report summarizes reported variations in the isotopic compositions of 20 elements that are due to physical and chemical fractionation processes (not due to radioactive decay) and their effects on the standard atomic weight uncertainties. For 11 of those elements (hydrogen, lithium, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and selenium), standard atomic weight uncertainties have been assigned values that are substantially larger than analytical uncertainties because of common isotope abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin. For 2 elements (chromium and thallium), recently reported isotope abundance variations potentially are large enough to result in future expansion of their atomic weight uncertainties. For 7 elements (magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, palladium, and tellurium), documented isotope-abundance variations in materials of natural terrestrial origin are too small to have a significant effect on their standard atomic weight uncertainties.

Compilation of Minimum and Maximum Isotope Ratios of Selected Elements in Naturally Occurring Terrestrial Materials and Reagents

This report is available as a pdf.

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Water Resources Investigation Report 01-4222

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2002

Corning Museum of Glass Periodic Table

A periodic table made from glassware at the Corning Museum of Glass:

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2014

Correspondences Between The Classical Thomson Problem and The Periodic Table of The Elements

By Tim (TJ) LaFave, a very detailed pdf discussing the correspondences between the classical Thomson Problem and the Periodic Table of the Elements. You will need to click thru and zoom in:

classical Thomson Problem and the Periodic Table

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2009

Crab Periodic Table

A crab PT. I know nothing about this, other than this photograph found on a blog:

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2012

Cupcakes, Periodic Table

From Kayla N. Green, Assistant Professor of Chemistry (Texas Christian University) comes a periodic table constructed from cupcakes baked for Chemistry Week 2012:

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2014

Cutting Board Periodic Table

From Etsy, a Cutting Board periodic table:

Cutting Board

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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1831

Daubeny's Teaching Display Board & Wooden Cubes of Atomic Weights

The Museum of the History of Science, Oxford, has a display of Charles Daubeny's teaching materials, including a black painted wooden board with "SYMBOLS OF SIMPLE BODIES": showing symbols, atomic weights and names of elements in two columns, and a small pile of cubes with element symbols.

Charles Daubeny and Chemistry at the Old Ashmolean

Charles Daubeny (1795-1867) was appointed Aldrichian Professor of Chemistry at Oxford in 1822. In 1847 he moved from the original laboratory in this basement [in the museum] to a new one built at his own expense at the Botanic Garden. His apparatus went with him and was preserved there. Daubeny actively campaigned for the teaching of science in Oxford and held several professorships in addition to chemistry. He also conducted research on subjects such as photosynthesis.

From the HSM Database (Inventory no. 17504):

DAUBENY'S LIST OF ATOMIC WEIGHTS Wooden panel, black with white lettering, listing in two columns the symbols and names of twenty elements. This lecture board is identical to the table in the third edition (1831) of E. Turner, 'Elements of Chemistry', apart from the atomic weight for bromine. Daubeny wrote a useful 'Introduction to the Atomic Theory' (published in three versions: 1831, 1840, and 1850), the first edition of which also quotes Turner's table. Probably contemporary with this lecture board are the wooden cubes with the symbols for certain elements.

The period from 1810 to 1860 was crucial in the development of the periodic table. Most of the main group and transition elements had been discovered, but their atomic weights and stoichiometries (combining ratios) had not been fully deduced. Oxygen was assumed to have a weight of 6, and consequently carbon is assumed to have a mass of 6.

Daubeny's element symbols and weights – along with the modern mass data – are tabulated:

Symbol Daubeny's Weight Modern Mass Data % error Stoichiometry Error
H 1 1 0%  
C 6 12 -100% factor of 2
O 8 16 -100% factor of 2
Si 8 28.1 -251% factor of 5 (?)
Al 10 27 -170% factor of 3
Mg 12 24.3 -103% factor of 2
N 14 14 0%  
S 16 32.1 -101% factor of 2
P 16 31 -94% factor of 2
Fl 19 19 0%  
Ca 20 40.1 -101% factor of 2
Na 24 23 4%  
Fe 28 55.8 -99% factor of 2
Cl 36 35.5 1%  
K 40 39.1 2%  
Cu 64 63.5 1%  
B 80 79.9 0%  
Pb 104 207 -99% factor of 2
I 124 127 -2%  
Hg 200 200.6 0%  

While quite a number of weights are close to the modern values, many are way out. However, the error is usually a stiotoimetric factor error.


From the HSM Database (Inventory no. 33732): SET OF WOODEN CUBES ILLUSTRATING ATOMIC WEIGHTS

Forty-two wooden cubes numbered 1-42, painted black with symbols for certain elements, compounds or radicals painted in white on the faces, together with the corresponding atomic, molecular or radical weights. The face markings appear in various combinations:

H C P Na Ca° S N K Fe K Na° Cy
1 6 16 24 28 16 14 40 28 48 32 26 48

A typical cube (no. 3) may be represented by the following figure. They present something of an enigma as their faces do not form an obvious pattern. The numbers indicate that there were 42 cubes. In style they are similar to the figures on the panel of atomic weights.

The cubes are listed in Daubeny's 1861 catalogue, p. 11 as: "Wooden cubes for illustrating atomic weight". [See D. R. Oldroyd, The Chemical Lectures at Oxford (1822-1854) of Charles Daubeny, M.D., F.R.S. Notes and Records of the Royal Society, vol. 33 (1979), pp. 217-259.]

This display was spotted by Eric Scerri who was visiting the museum with Mark Leach in 2010.

There is a virtual tour on the museum, and the above display is in the basement.

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2007

Death Metal Periodic Table

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2013

Don't Trust Atoms...

From Facebook... or buy the T-Shirt:

don't trust atoms

never trust atoms

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2011

Dufour's Periodic Tree: Two Short Films

Elsewhere in this database we can see the 1990 Dufour's Periodic Tree, now two short films have been made about this 3D formulation, here & here:

Eric Scerri Letter from Ben Ged Low on Vimeo.

 

Five Foot 3D Model from Ben Ged Low on Vimeo.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2004

Electron Overjump Periodic Table

Here are some origional periodic table ideas, including history and electron overjumpings by Oleg Aleksandrov, from here.

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2011

Element Game

Rose, a cute & smart 2 year old girl showing her excellent knowledge of the Periodic Table:

tnx to Boing Boing for the tip

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1955

Element Hunters

A YouTube video, The Element Hunters.

The text accompanying the video says:

"Scientist in Berkeley discover new elements [Californium & Einsteinium] from hydrogen bomb debris in 1951 and then use the 60 inch Cyclotron to create Mendelevium, element 101. The team included Nobel Prize winner Glenn Seaborg and famed element hunter, Albert Ghiorso."


Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip! 

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2019

Element Scarcity, Periodic Table of

The European Chemical Society Periodic Table depicting element scarcity was unveiled and discussed at a EuChemS event in the European Parliament on Tuesday 22nd January 2019.

The event, chaired by MEPs Catherine Stihler and Clare Moody, presented an encompassing overview of what element scarcity means for us: both on a scientific level, but also economically and politically. A presentation from speaker Natalia Tarasova, IUPAC Past President, contextualised EuChemS' work within the celebrations of the International Year of the Periodic Table, whilst M Pilar Gil, from the University of St Andrews, delivered a remarkable and exhilarating talk on how the recently discovered oldest known wallchart of the Periodic Table was uncovered and dated.

An article in The Conversation, by David Cole-Hamilton of the University of St Andrews, uses this periodic table to look at elements that are overexploited in the modern world.

"Red indicates that dissipation will make the elements much less readily available in 100 years or less: helium (He), silver (Ag), tellurium (Te), gallium (Ga), germanium (Ge), strontium (Sr), yttrium (Y), zinc (Zn), indium (In), arsenic (As), hafnium (Hf) and tantalum (Ta).

"Helium is used to cool the magnets in MRI scanners and to dilute oxygen for deep sea diving. Vital rods in nuclear reactors use hafnium. Strontium salts are added to fireworks and flares to produce vivid red colours. Yttrium is a component of camera lenses to make them shock and heat resistant. It is also used in lasers and alloys. Gallium, meanwhile, is used to make very high-quality mirrors, light-emitting diodes and solar cells."

Click image to enlarge:

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1970

Elements According to Relative Abundance

A 1970 periodic table by Prof. Wm. F. Sheehan of the University of Santa Clara that claims to show the elements according to relative abundance at the Earth's surface.

Click here to see the full size version with a little more text:

 

However, this author disputes the relative areas given to the various elements; there is almost no helium at the Earth's surface, for example.

Below is a conventional PT representation of the relative abundance of the elements in the Earth's crust taken from Mark Winter's WebElements website:

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2003

Elements by Orbital

From elsewhere in Mark Leach's Chemogenesis webbook:

Madelung's Rule tells us that the orbitals fill in the order n + l (lowest first). This gives the sequence:

Electronic structure can be illustrated adding electrons to boxes (to represent orbitals). This representation shows the Pauli exclusion principle, the aufbau principle and Hund's rule in action.

There are some subtle effects with the d block elements chromium, Cr, and copper, Cu. Hund's rule of maximum multiplicity lowers the energy of the 3d orbital below that of the the 4s orbital, due to the stabilisation achieved with a complete and spherically symmetric set of five 3d orbitals containing five or ten electrons. Thus,

  • Chromium has the formulation: [Ar] 3d5 4s1 and not: [Ar] 3d4 4s2
  • Copper has the formulation: [Ar] 3d10 4s1 and not: [Ar] 3d9 4s2

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2011

Elements in Bottles Periodic Table

A nice web site with a physical periodic table of elements:

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1967

Elements of The Standard Model

The first step towards the Standard Model of particle physics was Glashow's 1960 discovery of a way to combine the electromagnetic and weak interactions. In 1967, Weinberg & Salam incorporated the Higgs mechanism, giving the standard model its modern form of: quarks leptons and bosons.

These diagrams are the periodic tables of elementry particle physics:

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1959

Elements Song by Tom Lehrer

The Elements Song by Tom Lehrer recorded live in Copenhagen in 1967:

And, an animated version from 2008 of the 1959 original:

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2011

The Elements Song by Tom Lehrer Periodic Table

Started by David Bradley of Sciencebase, a selection of songs about the Periodic Table including the classic Tom Lehrer track.

"An unusual periodic table in which each element represents a rendition of the classic Tom Lehrer song, The Elements, which has to be every chemist's favourite song, really. There are also a few ringers, see if you can spot them. But, more to the point there are major gaps...so what's you're favourite Elements rendition? Let me know via Twitter or Facebook. I'd be particularly interested to see personal recordings and renditions done for your own site, lab or special event. You can find the original lyrics here; the tune is that of G&S's "Major General" from The Pirates of Penzance.":

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2016

Elements Song Updated by Helen Arney

Tom Lehrer's Elements Song Updated by Helen Arney with all 118 elements [as known to Harvard, as they have been discovered], including the newest ones: nihonium, moscovium, tennessine and oganesson.

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2003

Elephant Periodic Table

The periodic table does not map to an elephant very well:

Click on the poster below to go to a large version:

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2009

enkana's Periodic Table

A nice periodic table with a simple graphic for each element by enkana:

enkana

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2012

Eric Scerri.com

ericscerri.com is the personal internet domain and website of Eric Scerri: chemist and leading philosopher of science specializing in the history and philosophy of the periodic table. He is founder and editor-in-chief of the international journal Foundations of Chemistry, which publishes academic papers concerned with the PT, and is the author of the respected book: The Periodic Table and Its Significance (Oxford University Press, 2007).

The website has links to all of Eric's extensive publications, including online video lectures and interviews and external links.

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2007

Extending the Periodic Table

The periodic table now extends to element 118, Oganesson, and scientists are attempting to go further. Below is part of a Segre chart, proton number on the y-axis and neutron number of the x-axis, from a report from the Japanese Superheavy Element Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN.

The diagram shows various nuclear reactions, for example: 232Th + 40Ar to make 272Hs.

Thanks to Larry Tsimmerman for the tip!

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2008

f--l--A--r--k's Fractal Periodic Table

A fractal periodic table by f--l--A--r--k:

After nearly a year of work and research, the Periodic Table is complete.

I have endeavored to the best of my ability to accurately represent each element as a fractal. The table itself is up to date with current findings and research as of 2008.

Each element has been individually rendered at a resolution of 3200 x 2400, and is available for a full-view in my gallery. Every fractal was designed, composed, and rendered using Apophysis and then the final assembly done with Photoshop.

Many thanks go to Tony (~atd85) for his assistance in rendering quite a few of these elements, and to my wife for her inspiration and encouragement:

f--l--A--r--k 1

f--l--A--r--k 2

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1996

First Ionisation Energy of The Elements

Periodic trend for ionization energy, for example Mg → Mg+ + e

Each period begins at a minimum for the alkali metals, and ends at a maximum for the noble gases. From Wikipedia:

Based on data from: Martin, W. C.; Wiese, W. L. (1996). Atomic, Molecular, & Optical Physics Handbook. American Institute of Physics. ISBN 156396242X.

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2019

Frog Periodic Table

One of the frogs from Stockport's (UK) Giant Leap Frog Art Trail. This frog is Chemit.

Thanks to Helen P for the tip!

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2001

Funny Periodic Table

By Eric J Stone a Funny Periodic Table of chemical reactivity.

"This periodic table is unique -- it is informational, educational, and humorous at the same time. Arranged in the standard Mendeleev layout, this table depicts the elements interacting with each other in many interesting ways. The jokes are designed to impart useful information within the context of humor. Ideal for science buffs of all ages -- this is truly the periodic table for the masses. It can be appreciated by children and professionals alike. Children especially like the table, which draws them in with its funny vignettes. This poster is based on the original art of Slavomir Koys. The poster makes a great promotional item. Use it to promote your schools chemistry club or as science fair prizes":

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2008

Google Image Search Periodic Table

Davebug has made a periodic table using the top Google Image search result for each element. Cool and very www:

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2009

Graphic Representations of the Periodic System

Mary E. Saecker writes an article in Chemical Education Digital Library, Periodic Table Presentations and Inspirations: Graphic Representations of the Periodic System, that reviews some periodic table formunations.

The paper contains a link to this pdf file which gives templates and instructions for several print, cut-out & build periodic table formulations:

Supplement to: Periodic Table Presentations and Inspirations by Mary E. Saecker, J. Chem. Educ., 2009, 86, 1151.

Construction Directions A Cut-Out Chart of the Periodic System (Periodic Table Cylinder)

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1998

Gray's Wooden Periodic Table Table

Theodore Gray's Wooden Periodic Table Tablea wooden table that incorporates a periodic table – is a treasure trove, both on the web and in reality (his office).

The web site contains over 12 gig of data and beautiful images. Explore!

Theo's new site is periodictable.com.



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2006

Group Numbering Systems

IUPAC


Phase State: Solid, Liquid, Gas at 20°C & 700°C

By Mark Leach

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2001

Haiku Periodic Table

The excellent Periodic Table of Haiku has re-emerged from the 'Way Back" web-archive website.

 

A second 2009/10 Periodic Table of Haiku, from the University of Minnesota is available here.

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2017

Haiku, Elemental

By Mary Soon Lee, a review of the Periodic Table composed of 119 science haiku, one for each element, plus a closing haiku for element 119 (not yet synthesized). The haiku encompass astronomy, biology, chemistry, history, physics, and a bit of whimsical flair. Click here, then hover over an element on the Periodic Table to read the haiku.

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2019

Heritage Periodic Table Display

By Engineered Labs, the Heritage Periodic Table Display.

"Introducing the world's first and only miniature Periodic Table with the actual elements in it.

"Over the last year, we have successfully collected each and every stable element. After considerable R&D, we have finally developed a method of embedding each element in acrylic and we have to say, the result is awesome!

"The Heritage Periodic Table pretty much speaks for itself. The collection looks great on a desk, in your hands, and anywhere else it can be displayed."



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2013

Higgs Boson and Fundamental Particle/Force Periodic Tables

The Higgs boson sits at the heart of the Standard Model of particle physics, and so is at the centre of periodic table type representations of quarks, leptons and forces.

Three representations by the UCR Today, a video interview with Particle Fever editor Walter Murch: "The Higgs boson is kind of a MacGuffin" and from im9.eu:

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2019

Homage to The Elements

Eulalia Bosch writes:

"As a curator of the Eugènia Balcells Foundation, I would like to share with you the project to celebrate the 2019 UN decreed International Year of the Periodic Table (IYPT).

"Eugènia Balcells included the mural Homage to The Elements in her exhibition FREQUENCIES at the Santa Monica Art Center in Barcelona in 2009. The exhibit incorporates the spectrum of light that identifies each element. The result is not just another presentation of the periodic table, but a tribute to the set of elements that, in their intertwining, make up the material world and to those spectra that, as Eugènia Balcells like to say are: 'the voice of matter'.

"Over the last few years, the mural Homage to The Elements has also been incorporated at the Pascual Vila Research and Development Center of the CSIC in Barcelona, at the Science Museum, CosmoCaixa, in Barcelona and we are finishing the formalities for its installation in the Universities of Tarragona and Girona. It has also been acquired by the Technische Universität Berlin, and by the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, both in Germany. In the city of NY, where Eugènia lived for more than thirty years, the mural has found its place at the Maxine Greene High School for Imaginative Inquiry, located at the Martin Luther King Educational Campus in New York, in front of the Lincoln Center, the great ally artistic ally of the School.

"The Eugènia Balcells Foundation wants to actively collaborate in the celebration proposed by the United Nations offering to the educational world the mural Homage to The Elements, this sign that represents universal unity, and records the human knowledge acquired to this day.



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2011

Homenatge Als Elements

From Eugènia Balcells' blog (and translated using Google Translate):

TRIBUTE TO THE ELEMENTS was born as a counterpoint to the video-installation Eugènia Balcells often, a film without end where the trace elements that each emit light merges with the other and forming a true metaphor for origin of the universe.

Coinciding with the International Year of Chemistry, TRIBUTE TO THE ELEMENTS has been published in two formats: a poster in which each element is represented by its chemical symbol and its own emission spectrum and a version where each element, printed separately, part of a collection that can be stored as such or are available as a mural on a temporary or permanent exhibition space, as presented in the exposure:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2018

I Wear This Shirt Periodically T-Shirt

From Shared.com, a "I Wear This Shirt Periodically" T-Shirt:

Thanks to Clare Cheetham for the tip!

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2010

Imaginary Elements

An image of a Periodic Table Imaginary Elements by Russell Walks:

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2008

Instruments, Periodic Table of

A periodic table of various scientific instruments and techniques from Thermo Scientific and C&EN.

Download, zoom in & explore the interesting pdf file:

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2019

International Year of the Periodic Table (in Paris and Moscow)

Prof. Martyn Poliakoff of The University on Nottingham and Periodic Videos at the opening of the International Year of the Periodic Table:

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2019

International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri

A YouTube video about IUPAC's International Year of the Periodic Table:

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1966

Periodic Table of Ions

From Concept of Chemical Periodicity: from Mendeleev Table to Molecular Hyper-Periodicity Patterns E. V. Babaev and Ray Hefferlin, here.

"One intriguing problem that arises from with the periodic table of atoms is the possibility of constructing periodic systems of ions, V. K. Grigorovich, Periodic Law of Mendeleev and Electronic Structure of Metals, Nauka Publ.: Moscow, 1966 (in Russian). An atom can be completely or partially ionized to a cation by removing electrons or transformed into an anion by the addition of new electrons. The energy required for a few consecutive ionisations of atoms is plotted against the atomic number. One can see that the curves are periodic, and hence it is possible to construct periodic tables for mono-, di-, and multi- charged cations. If we look at the dispositions of the maxima and minima of the curves and compare them with those for atoms, it becomes evident that the magic numbers of electrons for ions are the same as for neutral atoms. Therefore, the number of electrons (but not the charge of the nucleus) is responsible for the periodicity of ions."

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2012

iPhone, Periodic Table of

An article in Scientific American Digging for Rare Earths: The Mines Where iPhones Are Born.

"About 60 miles southwest of Las Vegas, in a mine some 500 feet deep, the beginnings of an iPhone come to life. But the sleek, shiny iPhone is far, far removed from the rocks pulled out of this giant hole, which looks like a deep crater on the moon. Inside the rocks from this mine are rare-earth minerals, crucial ingredients for iPhones, as well as wind turbines, hybrid cars, and night-vision goggles. Minerals such as neodymium are used in magnets that make speakers vibrate to create sound. Europium is a phosphor that creates a bright red on an iPhone screen. Cerium gets put into a solvent that workers use to polish devices as they move along the assembly line, etc.":

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2009

Steve Jensen's "In-Finite Form"

"I'm a figurative sculptor, living in Minneapolis MN. A few years ago, while looking at a two dimensional version of the periodic table, I too wondered if it would be possible to create a Periodic Table without any visual breaks in its numerical sequence. Although I had never seen anything other than the rectangular flat table, I thought I might be able to solve this spatial continuity problem three dimensionally. I also wanted to limit myself to using a 3-D "line" that had no sudden changes in direction. After coming up with what I thought was a new and unique sculptural resolution, I put the project aside. Only recently (after re-building my paper model out of a translucent material) did I do some research on the web, and immediately recognized the strong likeness between my version and the Alexander Arrangement. Even more surprising was my models' visual similarity to Crookes' figure eight design from some 111 years ago.

"Although there are obviously many inventive and well thought out responses to this design challenge, I believe that my solution is a unique one, and an improvement over some of the previous three dimensional forms. The "line" of my model allows for contiguous numerical placement of all the symbols (while maintaining group continuity along its vertical axis), even as the shape of its plan view makes visual reference to the well-known symbol for infinity. What's more, in my version, the Lanthanide & Actinide series do not occupy a separate field but are fully integrated into the continuous linear flow. This piece, which I've entitled "In-Finite Form" speaks to the mystery of the endless flow of space, even as it folds back onto itself within the confines of a finite system."

Steve Jensen ©September 2009

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2013

Joke

Joke

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2001

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2012

JR's Chemistry Set

For the iPhone and iPad, JR's Chemistry Set makes chemistry interesting and fun to learn. Based upon the innovative Rota Period, it is a handy and powerful reference tool for chemistry enthusiasts and practitioners at all ages and all levels.

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2010

Kabbalistic Periodic Table

A Kabbalistic periodic table from www.inner.org that attempts to link the PT with the Torah version of Genesis:

Kabbalistic

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2007

Kansas Periodic Table

The Kansas periodic table... with warnings... by the reDiscovery Institute.

Click the link, then on the top left hand side of the page go to Chemistry, then Just a Theory:

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2016

KAS Periodic Table

The KAS periodic table reproduces and depicts the nuclear properties of chemical elements. This periodic table depicts not only the trends of nuclear properties, but also reproduces their numerical values that remain very close to the experimental values (difference less than 4%).

The Segre Chart is based on the number of protons, Z, and the number of neutrons, N. It is like a library of nuclei and shows the recorded data only. The Segre Chart can not work when the number of neutrons is not given. But KAS Periodic Table works when the number of neutrons is not given.It does not require the number of neutrons to produce the results.This is a simple chart based on the number of protons of chemical element. We identify the following properties of elements:-

  • Location that remains near the Neutron Dripline of element.
  • Location that remains very close to stable or long-lived isotopes of the element. Location that remains near the Proton Dripline of element.
  • In the case of superheavy elements, we identify which Compound Nuclei are involved in the Hot Fusion reaction and which Compound Nuclei are involved in the Cold Fusion reaction.
  • We see the r-process path and assess the r-process abundance.
  • The pattern of abundance of chemical elements.
  • We identify which elements are the product of exothermal fusion.
  • We identify the location of isotope on the basis of two-neutron separation energy.
  • Nuclear binding energy trend. Beta decay trend.
  • We see the Straight Line of Nuclear Stability.
  • Empirical Law discovered.
  • Periodicity in the nuclear properties.
  • We can compare the nuclear properties of an element with the nuclear properties of almost all the chemical elements.

Read more here, here and here.

KAS Periodic Table

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2010

Periodic Table of Periodic Tables

Keaggy, of www.keaggy.com, has put together a rather cool 'Periodic Table of Periodic Tables', clearly using this web site as one of the major resources:

 

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2010

Khipu or Quipu Periodic Table

The Khipu or Quipu or Talking Knot Periodic Table, developed by Julio Antonio Gutierrez Samanez.

Google translated from the Spanish pdf file:

"As a result of bringing together each pair of periods in a single function or binod, the author has found a new regular on the subject, which has been defined as a new quantum number, since the number of orders or regulations binod growth elements in the table, under the appearance of pairs of new types of quantum structures or periods whose organization responds to a simple mathematical function: a parable of the type Y = 4 X ^ 2 - In this case report: a) That the strings correspond to pairs of periods or binod and knots are double for items with orbital s (in red), six nodes for p in orange, 10 yellow d knots and 14 knots for green f . b) That in each binod or rope, appear regularly in pairing mode or dual, new quantum or orbital structures, such as moving from within the orbital previous binod.":

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2019

Kid's Periodic Table

From Cognitive Classroom, a Kid's 'cut-down' Periodic Table:

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2019

Knitted Blanket Periodic Table, In Time to Celebrate 150th Anniversary

Trish Bosco thought we might be interested in her periodic table blanket.

"It took me almost 4 years to make it, but I finished in time to celebrate the 150th anniversary! You can see my progression here":

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2018

Lego® Periodic Table

Welcome to the Lego® Periodic Table of Elements.

Students and faculty at Spring Arbor University (MI), students and faculty at Hardin Valley Academy (TN), and members of the community surrounding Spring Arbor have worked together to construct a periodic table entirely out of Lego® blocks.

On each elemental square has been placed a small Lego® creation that somehow represents the element on which it is positioned.

You can learn a little bit about each element by clicking on its particular square on the table below.

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1934

Leningrad Monument To The Periodic Table

Leningrad monument to the periodic table, located near to the main chamber of weights and measures, 1934 (from van Spronsen):

From Wikipedia:

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2014

Letters & Words Periodic Table

By Claude Ziad Bayeh:

Words Periodic Table

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2009

KU Leuven Periodic Table

On the ground floor of the Universiteitshal (University Hall) of KU Leuven in Belgium is a physical periodic table.

Each element can be explored from this page:

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2010

Lewis Octet Periodic Table

A periodic table showing the outer shell of valence electrons associated with Lewis atoms:

By Mark Leach

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2019

Möbius-Escher Periodic Table

A comment article in Nature by Prof. Eric Scerri about quantum mechanics and the periodic table:

"Can quantum ideas explain chemistry's greatest icon? Simplistic assumptions about the periodic table lead us astray.

"Such has been the scientific and cultural impact of Dmitri Mendeleev's periodic table of the elements that many people assume it is essentially complete. [But] in its 150th year, can researchers simply raise a toast to the table's many dividends, and occasionally incorporate another heavy synthetic element?

"No – this invaluable compilation is still not settled. The placements of certain elements, even hydrogen and helium, are debated."

The article is accompanied by a fantastic illustration by Señor Salme with ideas from the Möbius strip and M.C. Escher:

Click image to enlarge:

Another Señor Salme PT image:

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1944

Müller's Tree System

In 1944 Müller produced a formulation based on Darwin's tree of life (from van Spronsen):

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2012

Magnetic Periodic Table

By Particle Zoo, sellers of Higgs Boson and Anticharm Quark soft toys, comes a magnetic periodic table which you can arrange into any formulation you like!

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2012

Mathematical Expression of Mendeleev's Periodic Law

Valery Tsimmerman, of the ADOMAH Tetrahedron periodic table formulation and the Perfect Periodic Table website, presents a Mathematical Expression of Mendeleev's Periodic Law:

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1974

Mazurs' PT Formulation Analysis

In his 1974 book Edward G. Mazurs (2nd edition) Graphic Representations of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, University of Alabama Press gives a comprehensive analysis of periodic table formulations.

Mazurs identifies most PT formulations as being:

  • Spiral
  • Plane lemniscate
  • Concentric circles
  • Helix on a cylinder
  • Helix on a cone
  • Space lemniscate
  • Space concentric circles

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2009

Meet the Elements

"Meet the Elements", is a song & video from They Might be Giants, on bOING bOING:





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1997

Memory Pegs Periodic Table

On John Pratt's website there is a periodic table of Memory Pegs.

"Each picture in this periodic table is designed to remind you of the element's name, atomic number, and abbreviation. Point to the element to see its name and number. Click on the element for more explanation and then Back to return to the table. There is also an explanation of how to use the pictures as memory pegs. You can also see the name and number of the element by pointing to it and reading the address in the status window at the bottom. At least memorize the first twenty! Each of those first 20 also has a unique color which can also be used for memorizing a list of twenty objects by associating a color with each.":

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2019

Mendeleev 150

Mendeleev 150 is the 4th International Conference on the Periodic Table. The event welcomed nearly 300 guests from over 30 countries and has become one of the key events of IUPAC's International Year of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1891

Mendeleev's Properties of The Chemical Elements

Scanned from the first English edition of Dmitrii Mendeleev's Principles of Chemistry (translated from the Russian fifth edition) a table showing the periodicity of the properties of many chemical elements, taken from the Wikipedia from where a 2116 x 2556 version is available, or here.

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1996

Metals in Medicine Periodic Table

From Metal Complexes in Aqueous Solutions by Martell & Hancock, a periodic table of metals in medicine.

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2019

Meyer's NYT Graphic

A nice graphic by Alex Eben Meyer in the New York Times accompanying an article about the periodic table and some of Sir Martyn Poliakoff ideas.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2000

MIT Periodic Table Characters

Eric Scerri writes:

"This apparently hangs on a wall of Building 6 at MIT. I have identified the people around the old-school periodic table, they are (from left to right): Zosimos, Ko Hung, Jabir, Boyle, Lomonosov, Lavoisier, Berzelius, Wohler, Cannizzaro, Berthelot & Mendeleev":

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2012

Mnemonic Periodic Table Song

By Ballroom Jam, a mnemonic song to help memorise the chemical elements:



Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2012

Mug Periodic Table

From www.msmugs.com, a coffee mug with the periodic table of the elements with the elements Lu and Lr correctly positioned... and a gift from Chris H.:

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2018

Murov's Colours of the Elements

Steven Murov writes :

"The element squares of this periodic table have colors resembling the actual colors of the elements. The table provides insight useful for helping to distinguish metals and non-metals as well as observations on elements of unusual color. The colors were taken from https://www.chemicool.com/ and applied with RGB codes."

The tables are available online at:

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2013

Music Notes of Periodic Table

By Claude Bayeh, a Musical Notes formulation:

Music Notes of Periodic Table

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2018

Nawa's V.E.T. Periodic Table & Hourglass

Nagayasu Nawa, the prolific designer of periodic tables, here and here, has come up with an orbital filling periodic table and a corresponding hourglass animation. Nawa writes:

"I have turned the v.e.c. PT into the GIF animation that I call the electron hourglass, 1 second for each element. It takes 120 seconds from 1H to 120 Ubn. I have coloured orbital with colour derived from each shell's name, such as:

  • K kiwi
  • L lapis lazuli
  • M mauve
  • N navy
  • O orange
  • P purple
  • Q quick silver"

Click image to enlarge.

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2010

Neutronic Schema of the Elements

The Neutronic Schema of the Elements, with LATIN NOTATION by Families and Groups, by Earth/matriX, Science Today, 11" x 17" laminated, color, shows each element of the periodic table with its notation in Latin letters instead of their historically accidental names and symbols:

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1991

Non-Scientist's Periodic Table

By John T Hortenstine Jr. of the R.W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute, The Non-Scientists Concept of the Periodic Table of the Elements, for example "Zirconium, in Fake Diamonds", etc.

Click here for the big version.

Non Scientist PT

Non Scientist PT

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1936

Orbital Filling With Electrons

Students of chemistry are often confused why the orbitals fill with electrons: 1s2, 2s2, 2p6, 3s2, 3p6, 4s2, 3d10, 4p6... etc., because the 3d10 seems to be 'out of sequence'.

This 'out of sequence' difficulity is nicely explained if the orbitals are arranged in a slightly different way:

The aufbau principle states that in the ground state of an atom or ion, electrons fill atomic orbitals of the lowest available energy levels before occupying higher levels. For example, the 1s shell is filled before the 2s subshell is occupied. In this way, the electrons of an atom or ion form the most stable electron configuration possible.

The order in which these orbitals are filled is given by the n + rule, also known as the Madelung rule (after Erwin Madelung), the Janet rule or the diagonal rule.

Orbitals with a lower n + value are filled before those with higher n + values. In this context, n represents the principal quantum number and ? the azimuthal quantum number. The values = 0, 1, 2, 3 correspond to the s, p, d and f orbital lables.

Julio Gutiérrez Samanez writes:

"I send you the diagram below that reconciles quantum mechanics (diagram for filling the electronic cells) with the Janet table or LSPT. Explaining the duplication of periods with the duplication of the quantum number n, and the introduction of Tao (T) spin of the level or spin of the period, which explains the parity of the symmetric periods."

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2009

Orbitron Gallery of Atomic Orbitals

The Orbitron gallery of atomic orbitals is a poster available from Mark Winter's Web Elements:

The orbitron web page is here.

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2018

Organic Chemist's Periodic Table (another one)

The Periodic Table as seen by an Organic Chemist... a T-Shirt by REDBUBBLE:

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2005

Painting of The Elements

From Gabrielle David's website, here, a painting called Elements, inspired by Melinda Green's Periodic Fractal formulation of 1995:

  • The tiniest ball in the center is hydrogen, the next helium, lithium, etc.
  • Colors indicate the chemical group.

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2010

Periodic Arch of The Elements

Cynthia K. Whitney of Galilean Electrodynamics writes: "In his paper Explaining the periodic table, and the role of chemical triad, Eric Scerri mentioned the existence of at least four different candidate places for Hydrogen: Group 1 (alkali metals - Lithium, etc.), Group 17 (halogens - Fluorine, etc.), Group 14 (Carbon, etc.), or off the Periodic Table entirely, because it is so odd! The four-fold multiplicity (and maybe more) of candidate places for Hydrogen triggered in me the following thought: the excessive multiplicity of candidate places may have to do with the rectangular nature of the Periodic Tables under consideration there." Read more in this pdf file.

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2018

Periodic Table Song (2018 UPDATE!)

An AsapSCIENCE song + video of the chemical elements. This is a nice alternative to the well known Tom Lehrer Elements song from 1959.

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2009

Periodic Table Table

A Periodic Table Table from Wake Forest Univerity, North Carolina:

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2016

Philatelic Table of The Elements

Larry French writes:

"I created and first displayed [this Philatelic Table of the Elements] at the ACS National Meeting in San Diego.

"The table has been assembled with each element is represented by a single (or in a few cases a pair) of postage stamps. The table offers a platform for discussions of people, places, sources and applications associated with 114 elements. A total of 73 stamp issuing entities are represented. The table runs from hydrogen, with a North Vietnamese stamp celebrating the test of first Chinese H bomb, to livermorium, represented by a Soviet issue marking the 25th anniversary of the Nuclear Research Institute at Dubna. The table travels from Bolivia's Salar de Uyuni (lithium) to the Enewetak Atoll of the Marshall Islands (einsteinium) and spotlights environmental impacts of phosphate extraction in Nauru and lead mining in Peru. Discoverers and inventors from Moissan and Soddy to Auer and the Curies are met along the way. A range of applications including cesium formate brines in North Sea oil and gas drilling, indium in solar energy conversion, lanthanum in electric cars and technetium in positron emission tomographic medical imaging is included.

"Eventually, my aim is to produce a book which includes an essay for each element and stamp. I have made significant headway with the writing but there is much still to be done."

Larry French
Baker Professor of Chemistry
St. Lawrence University

Click here for full size version

Philatelic periodic table

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2016

Pictures & Words

A couple of periodic tables from Keith Enevoldsen with information shown in Pictures & Words:

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

 

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2005

Pictures, Periodic Table of

By Keith Enevoldsen, a Periodic Table of The Elements in Pictures:

 

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2018

Places of the Periodic Table

An interactive, searchable Google map of places associated with the developers of the periodic table and with the chemical elements with links to further information brought to you by Carmen Giunta and James Marshall, with the encouragement of the ACS Division of the History of Chemistry (HIST), to mark the International Year of the Periodic Table (IYPT). This is an interactive searchable map of places associated with the developers of the periodic table and with the chemical elements with links to further information.

Examples include places where elements were discovered or synthesized, mineral sources of elements, places where discoverers of chemical periodicity worked, and places for which elements were named. Each entry contains links to further information about the person, place, or event described. The type of site is indicated (for example, lab, residence, mineral source, etc.), as well as whether (to the best of our knowledge) the historical site still exists at the location. For more information on the type of site, please consult this key to the map's fields. The map is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not meant as a travel guide. If you wish to visit a site on this map, please consult other resources to confirm access, and use common sense. (Read more here.)

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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1984

Planiverse Periodic Table

The Planiverse is set in a 2-D universe that somehow enters into resonance with ours, enabling a computing professor (which Dewdney is) and his class to follow the adventures and scientific education of the hero Yendred (Dewdney backwards).

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2008

Polymer Periodic Table

"The Periodic Table of the elements by Mendeleev was a historic achievement in chemistry and enabled chemists to see the relationship between structure and properties of the basic elements. Polymers also have a strong relationship between structure and properties and this Periodic Table of Polymers is a first attempt to provide a simple codification of the basic polymer types and structures. The diversity of polymer types makes it impossible to include all of the variations in one simple table and this table only includes the most common polymers. At this stage the Table only includes the most common thermoplastics but it will be extended in the future to include thermosets and potentially rubbers and alloys/blends."

Download the pdf file.

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2007

Periodic Table Stamp, from Spain

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1975

Primo Levi's Elements

Primo Levi's elements, from his book The Periodic Table:



Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2015

Protein Complexes, Periodic Table of

The Periodic Table of Protein Complexes, developed by researchers in the UK and published in the in the journal Science (Dec 11, 2015), offers a new way of looking at the enormous variety of structures that proteins can build in nature. More importantly, it suggests which ones might be discovered next and how entirely novel structures could be engineered. Created by an interdisciplinary team led by researchers at the Wellcome Genome Campus and the University of Cambridge, the Table provides a valuable tool for research into evolution and protein engineering.

Read more on Kurzweil and Wild Types (ASBMB Today).

Protein Complexes

Protein Complexes

Thanks to Bob Bruner for the tip!

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2002

Protein Structure Periodic Tables

From a paper by W. R. Taylor, A 'Periodic Table' for Protein Structures, Nature, 2002 Apr 11;416(6881):657-60

Abstract:

Current structural genomics programs aim systematically to determine the structures of all proteins coded in both human and other genomes, providing a complete picture of the number and variety of protein structures that exist. In the past, estimates have been made on the basis of the incomplete sample of structures currently known. These estimates have varied greatly (between 1,000 and 10,000; see for example refs 1 and 2), partly because of limited sample size but also owing to the difficulties of distinguishing one structure from another. This distinction is usually topological, based on the fold of the protein; however, in strict topological terms (neglecting to consider intra-chain cross-links), protein chains are open strings and hence are all identical. To avoid this trivial result, topologies are determined by considering secondary links in the form of intra-chain hydrogen bonds (secondary structure) and tertiary links formed by the packing of secondary structures. However, small additions to or loss of structure can make large changes to these perceived topologies and such subjective solutions are neither robust nor amenable to automation. Here I formalize both secondary and tertiary links to allow the rigorous and automatic definition of protein topology.

This work has been developed by Efrosini Moutevelis and Derek N. Woolfson in their paper A Periodic Table of Coiled-Coil Protein Structures, J. Mol. Biol. (2009) 385, 726–732.

Abstract:

Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more ?-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils", which we have made available here. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of α-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

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2012

QR Coded Audio Periodic Table of the Elements

The QR coded Audio Periodic Table of the Elements by Vasco D. B. Bonifa?cio, REQUIMTE, Chemistry Department, Faculdade de Cie?ncias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal. Email: vbb@fct.unl.pt.

From the paper in The Journal of Chemical Education "A quick response coded audio periodic table of the elements (QR-APTE) was developed using free online resources. The potential of QR-APTE was tested using a smart phone and is envisaged to become a truly powerful tool to teach chemistry to blind and visually impaired students under a mobile-learning environment":

 

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2019

Quantum Victoria Periodic Art

In 2019 Quantum Victoria, an Australian specialist STEM education centre for primary and secondary students and teachers, commissioned a series of 51 images illustrating the birth of the Universe through elements of significance from the Periodic Table.

These will be permanently installed at Quantum Victoria and launched in July to celebrate IYPT2019 - the 150th anniversary of the discovery of the Periodic Table in 1869.

All designs are available as limited edition prints in sizes from A3 to one metre across, printed with archival inks on 100% cotton paper.

Click here or on the image below to access the website and larger versions of the illustrations.

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1908

Ramsay's Periodic Table

William Ramsay with a section of his 1904 periodic table as a portrait in Vanity Fair.

From the Science History Institute:

In 1892 Ramsay's curiosity was piqued by Lord Rayleigh's observation that the density of nitrogen extracted from the air was always greater than nitrogen released from various chemical compounds. Ramsay then set about looking for an unknown gas in air of greater density, which – when he found it – he named argon.

While investigating for the presence of argon in a uranium-bearing mineral, he instead discovered helium, which since 1868 had been known to exist, but only in the sun. This second discovery led him to suggest the existence of a new group of elements in the periodic table. He and his coworkers quickly isolated neon, krypton, and xenon from the earth's atmosphere. 

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2007

Rap Periodic Table by NOVI NOV

NOVI NOV writes:

"I infused the Periodic Table into a rap. It was for an old mixtape. I used to record all my music through my camcorder and would delete the video...and mix just the vocals. I kept some of those video files...enjoy"

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2011

Rapping the Elements

Oort Kuiper writes:

"Many people have heard of Tom Lehrer's 'The Elements' song. One day I decided to search for it online to memorise some stuff about the elements and found out that Daniel 'Harry Potter' Radcliffe had recently recited it on TV. I wondered what he (and the viewers) might have learnt about the elements by listening to it but shock horror... after listening I realised the song hadn't actually told me anything about The Periodic Table, except what's on it! So I decided to do my own song, specifically about The Periodic Table."

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2010

Recipe For A Human Shirt

By Sean Fallon and available from Fashionably Geek, A Recipe For Humans Shirt:

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2016

Rejected Element Names, Periodic Table of

A periodic table of rejected element names by Andy Brunning's Compound Interest:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2007

Rock, Periodic Table of

From OscTV:

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2013

RSC Visual Elements Periodic Table: Alchemy

From the RSC Website: "Alchemists are often described as the first chemists. They developed an extraordinary language (rather than the chemical symbols we use today) to describe all manner of things, from chemical reactions to philosophical tenets. Click on ‘What is Alchemy?’ to learn about the three aims of the alchemists. Click on each of the alchemical symbols for more information and to see alternative symbols."

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2009

Russian Periodic Table

A modern Russian periodic table using the Mendeleeve formulation:

An older version of the same formulation (date unknown, 1950s?), from here:

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2019

Schaltenbrand's Helical Gathering of the Elements

From the RSC Website:

"A glistering, shining spiral made of silver, gold, platinum, palladium and a diamond forms the show-stopping apex of the tribute from the University of Cambridge's St Catharine's college to the International Year of the Periodic Table.

"Commissioned to match George Schaltenbrand's 1920 design for a helical gathering of the elements – albeit extended to all 118 current elements – and signed by Yuri Oganessian, it is almost certainly the most expensive periodic table in the world."

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2010

Science Museum Lockers

From Kotaku:

While visiting the Nagoya City Science Museum, Twitter user Kantaku noticed something very cool, the coin lockers.

The name of each element is written below each symbol in Japanese, allowing visitors to store their belongings in Helium, Calcium, Oxygen, Potassium and more.

The number of each locker corresponds to the element. So, locker 21 is Scandium as it's the twenty-first element on the periodic table. Locker 3? It's Lithium, like it is on the periodic table, and so on. Dibs on Krypton!

Science Museum Lockers

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2019

Scott Van Note Periodic Table Sculpture

On the Saatchi Art website, a 3D periodic table Sculpture by Scott Van Note.

Sculpture: Metal (Bronze). Ten made for the local ASM international chapter.

Loops and changes of direction show electron shell filling. S,P,D,F with S just a change of direction. Continuous spiral from top to bottom. New loops introduce as the electron shell would. Does not show the out-of-order shell filling.

Keywords: periodic,   science,   sculpture,   functional,   nerd

Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip!

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1945

Segré Chart of Elements & Isotopes

The Segré chart of elements and isotopes arranges atomic nuclei by numbers or protons and numbers of neutrons and is a table of nuclides. There are various ways the axes can be arranged. From elsewhere in this chemogenesis web book:

And from Wikipedia:

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2019

Setting The Table

The journal Science gives "a visual brief history" of the periodic table, with some neat graphics showing the PT grew and changed with time. (You will need to visit the webpage to see the cool graphics inaction):

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2013

Shapes Periodic Table

By ScienceIsGolden.com comes the Periodic Table of Shapes. The site is worth clicking around, as there is a lot of good PT stuff to find:

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2013

Simplest Periodic Table

No numbers, just dots by London-based graphic designer Alison Haigh.

Each element is represented by a visualization of its electronic structure, rather than by numbers and letters:

Dots

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1998

The Simpsons Periodic Table

A Periodic Table from the Simpsons... look closely and it is not quite as expected...

Lisa Gets an "A" Season Ten (1998-1999) - 23 Episodes [204-226] Episode 210 Original Airdate on FOX: 22-Nov-1998

Skinner:       We can buy =real= periodic tables instead of these promotional ones from Oscar Meyer.

Krabappel:    Who can tell me the atomic weight of bolognium?

Martin:         Ooh ... delicious?

Krabappel:    Correct. I would also accept snacktacular.

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2000

Sistema Peryodico

A famous Spanish periodic table with puns/jokes on the element names. (Click here for a larger version.)

  • For example, in Spanish hydrogen is "Hidrogen" which is made up from the root words "water" and "genius"... hence the genie from Aladdin.
  • Likewise, the Spanish for chromium, "Cromo" is the same as the word for stamp... hence a picture of a stamp.

This is one for Spanish speaking chemists!

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2005

Smart Elements

Smart Elements, at smart-elements.com, is a company selling physical samples of chemical elements for research, education & collection.

  • High purity Elements for Science, Laboratory and Education
  • High-End element samples for collectors, museums, lectures and exhibitions
  • Free picture service for educational purposes
  • Professional advisory service
  • Purchase of Elements

Smart Elements sell numerous examples of all the naturally occuring elements. For example they sell 26 copper, Cu, products including samples in acrylic blocks, vials and bottles:

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2008

Snelson Atom

"Kenneth Snelson's Portrait of an Atom is a multi-media artwork that [attempts to] describe the atom's electronic architecture. If you happen to have a rapid prototype printer this STL file can be downloaded free for creating a desktop model at any preferred size of the Snelson atom."

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2013

Spectraphonic Periodic Table

Relax and enjoy the Spectraphonic Periodic Table of the Elements, the first and only periodic table where you may hear the characteristic light signature (spectra) of each element dropped forty octaves into the auditory range. Hear the sounds of the atoms. Experience the building blocks of reality... of the Universe... of You.:

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2013

Spider Chart of The Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

A Spider Chart linking together various ideas about the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements by Roy Alexander (of Alexander Arrangement fame).

Click here to embiggen the image:

Spider Chart

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2008

Spiral Periodic Table

A spiral periodic table available as a poster, binder, cup, T-shirt, etc. by Vectoria:

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2018

Stamps Commemorating Yuri Organeson

Stamps Commemorating Yuri Organeson, Issued by Armenia, Dec 28th, 2017

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2013

Stardust Periodic Table of The Elements

Inspired by Carl Sagan, Stardust Elements introduces a display case of the periodic table of the elements with real high purity samples:

Stardust Elements

Stardust Elements

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2018

Superconductivity of Hydrides Periodic Table

Scientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Skoltech have demonstrated the high-temperature superconductivity of actinium hydrides and discovered a general principle for calculating the superconductivity of hydrides based on the periodic table alone. The results of their study were published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2009

Sweater With Periodic Table

A sweater with a periodic table and stitch pattern details, as seen on the This and That blog:

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2014

Table Lab

The Table Lab with several Periodic Tables:

Animal, Cat, Christmas, Crayon, Dinosaur, Dog, Farm, Mixology, Sushi Bar & USA... as well as Classic:

Table Lab

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2014

Table of Organic Chemicals and Their Smells

A table of organic chemicals and their smells:

Organic Chemistry Smells

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2017

Tetris Version of the Periodic Table

From a Piled Higher and Deeper [Ph.D. Comics] video, here, a Tetris version of the Periodic Table:

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2008

Twin Vortex Theory

By consulting engineer Anthony H. Davis comes the Twin Vortex Theory of nuclear structure. Read more in the attached PDF and watch the embedded video below:

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2013

Twitter Handle Periodic Table

From Stuart Cantrill of Chemical Connections:

So, you're a chemist and you've finally decided to find out what all the fuss is about with this thing called Twitter. You decide to sign up, but, for whatever reason, you don't fancy using your own name. Maybe an element; that would be cool wouldn't it?

You are a chemist after all. Maybe you work with Grubbs' catalyst a lot, and you like the idea of being @ruthenium. Or perhaps Stille/Suzuki/Heck couplings are your thing and so @palladium seems appropriate.

Not into metals? Well why not @fluorine, @helium or @bromine?

Well, I'm sorry to report that all of those are taken, but there are 114 named elements (we're ignoring those ununelementium placeholder names) to choose from. Surely some of the more exotic elements must be there for the taking?

Well, no. Gone. All of 'em.

Thought you'd sneak in and claim one of the two newest additions to the periodic table @flerovium or @livermorium? Sorry, you've been beaten.

Here is the periodic table of Twitter, with all the accounts linked:

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2004

Periodic Tables in Two Hundred Languages

Periodic Tables of the Elements in Two Hundred Languages:

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2010

UCL Lecturers, Periodic Table Of

This table attempts to chart the evolution of the department from its inception in 1826 to the present day through the members of academic staff who have taught here. The names appear in order of appointment. In the interests of clarity, the f-block has been suppressed in its entirety. This move in no way reflects Departmental Policy. UCL Chemistry does not discrimate against particular azimuthal quantum numbers and has no comment to make regarding elements with n > 6.

Click on a name to get details of the time they spent here and perhaps even see a picture of the person. With time we hope to include biographical information, anecdotes, lists of key publications, pictures of mountains they climbed, and other goodies from our archives. An alphabetical list is also available. Disclaimer: Positions in the chart are provisional and no conclusions concerning the moral fibre of any individual should be drawn on the basis of their position in a group or by virtue of a diagonal relationship to anyone else.

Produced by Dr Andrea Sella, with thanks to Ms Tina Simon for the design idea.

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2019

Ultimate Periodic Table by Goodfellow

While the 'ultimate' periodic table by Goodfellow may not appear to be very ultimate, it does actually a possess a very rare property: Goodfellow is a materials company that supplies most of the chemical elements for industrial and research use.

By clicking on the element palladium, various facts about, and properties of, Pd are shown. Additionally, Goodfellow can supply:

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2013

Underground Map of the Elements

By Dr Mark Lorch of the University of Hull, an Underground Map of the Elements.

From here: "My son loves trains. So I came up with a train related twist to an inspection of the periodic table. We sat and cut up a copy of the table and then rearranged each element as a 'station' on an underground rail system. Each line represents a characteristic shared by the elements on that line":

Underground Map of the Elements

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2007

University of Jaén (Spain) Wall Mural Periodic Table

From November of 2007 a large Periodic Table placed on the main facade of Sciences Building in the University of Jaén (Spain) welcome everybody.

The table was made in honor of Mendeleev on the 100 aniversary of his death and on the occasion of the Spanish Year of Science according to the concept and design of the Spanish Chemist Antonio Marchal Ingrain, who was inspired in a postage stamp launched that year in Spain.

The artistic mural is composed of 117 tiles of 20 x 30 cm, one for each of the elements known to date, reaching a final dimensions of 2.8 x 3.6 meters. Apart from the traditional information with which students are familiar, such as the atomic number, atomic mass and the chemical symbol of the element, each of the ceramics incorporate information concerning the meaning of its name in Latin or Greek, the year and the name of the person or group of people who discovered it or isolated.

Dr. Antonio Marchal, UNIVERSITY OF JAÉN, SPAIN

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2017

University of Murcia's Oversize Periodic Table

From C&EN:

The faculty at the University of Murcia in Spain has a giant periodic table of the elements emblazoned on the facade of the school's chemistry building.

Covering 150 m2, the table displays 118 elements identified by their symbol, atomic number, and atomic mass. "It could be the world's largest permanent periodic table placed on a wall", Pedro Lozano Rodriguez, dean of the department of chemistry at the school, tells Newscripts.

A number of local companies chipped in to place the oversize chart on the side of the building, including the energy firm Repsol, the brewer Estrella de Levante, and personal care products maker Tahe Productos Cosméticos. Lozano says the display will serve as part of an introductory chemistry lesson for incoming freshmen.

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2016

Valentine Periodic Table

A Valentine Periodic Table by Claude Bayeh:

Valentine Periodic Table by Claude Bayeh

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2017

Venn Diagram of the Chemical Elements and the United States

A rather nice Venn diagram showing the intersection of the chemical element symbols and the States of the Union (based on an origional found at I Love Charts):



Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2018

Waterloo Periodic Table Project/Projet Tableau Périodique

To celebrate the International Year of Chemistry (IYC), Chem 13 News magazine together with the University of Waterloo's Department of Chemistry and the Faculty of Science encouraged chemistry educators and enthusiasts worldwide to adopt an element and artistically interpret that element.

The project created a periodic table as a mosaic of science and art. Students from all Canadian provinces and territories, 20 U.S. states and 14 countries researched, created and designed the elemental tiles. We created a poster, wall mural and a mobile app. The app includes the creative process behind each tile along with basic atomic properties of the element. The free app work to truly highlight the artistic expression of the Periodic Table Project. Thank you to all the teachers and students who participated in the collaborative Periodic Table Project.

Read more on the University of Waterloo website.

Click here image to enlarge the PT below.

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2014

Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony Periodic Table

From the 2014 Winter Olympics Opening ceremony, a Russian periodic table. See the whole video on RuTube.

Olympic PT

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2012

Wonderful Life with the Elements

From the Japanese artist Bunpei Yorifuji comes Wonderful Life with the Elements, an illustrated guide to the periodic table that gives chemistry a friendly face, available from Amazon.

In this super periodic table, every element is a unique character whose properties are represented visually: heavy elements are fat, man-made elements are robots, and noble gases sport impressive afros. Every detail is significant, from the length of an element's beard to the clothes on its back. You'll also learn about each element's discovery, its common uses, and other vital stats like whether it floats - or explodes - in water.

There is also a full review with more images from Wired.

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2010

World's Smallest Periodic Table

The World's Smallest Periodic Table:

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Periodic Table, What is it showing?
Binary Compounds

© Mark R. Leach 1999-


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