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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

  Text Search:       


Periodic Table database entries referencing Eric Scerri, by date:

1831   Daubeny's Teaching Display Board & Wooden Cubes of Atomic Weights
1862   Meyer's Periodic System
1864   Naquet's Families of Elements
1866   Spectroscope Revelations
1867   Hinrichs' Programme of Atomechanics
1868   Meyer's "Lost" Table
1885   Klieber's Cosmochemical Periodic Table
1896   Richards' Classification of The Elements
1904   Ramsay's Periodic Arrangement of The Elements
1905   Werner's Arrangement
1905   Gooch & Walker's Periodic System of The Elements
1907   van den Broek's Periodic Table 1
1911   van den Broek's Periodic Table 2
1913   van den Broek's Periodic Table 3
1915   Crehore's Periodic System
1916   Dushman's Periodic Table
1919   Hackh's Classification of the Elements, Updated
1919   Hackh's Periodic Spiral
1919   Hackh's Periodic Chain
1920   Black & Conant's Periodic Classification Of The Elements
1925   Courtines' A Model of the Periodic Table
1925   Sommerfeld's Electon Filling Diagram
1926   Hopkins' Nearly Completed Periodic Table of The Elements
1928   Riesenfeld's Periodic Table
1930   Nekrasov Periodic Table
1942   Paneth's Table
1948   Hakala's Electronic Orbital Filling
1951   Tomkeieff's Periodic Table Formulation Formula
1960   Sistema Periodico Degli Elementi
1961   Chaverri's Tabla Periodica de Los Elementos
1970   Luder's Atomic-Structure Chart of the Elements
1975   Primo Levi's Elements
1975   Russian Periodic Table(s)
1987   Elsevier's Periodic Table of the Elements
1989   Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table
1990   Dufour's Periodic Tree
1991   Non-Scientist's Periodic Table
1992   Fet's Periodic Tables
1994   f-Block Elements 3D Periodic Table
1997   Scerri's Bayley-Thomsen-Bohr Periodic Table
2000   MIT Periodic Table Characters
2006   Scerri's Periodic Table
2006   Scerri's The Periodic Table & Its Significance
2008   Radio Show "The Music of Matter"
2009   Scerri's Selected Papers on The Periodic Table
2010   Periodic Arch of The Elements
2010   Before & After Mendeleev: Periodic Table Videos
2010   Scandium Group and The Periodic Table
2010   Science Museum Lockers
2011   Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table
2011   Homenatge Als Elements
2011   Dufour's Periodic Tree: Two Short Films
2011   Scerri's Very Short Introduction To The Periodic Table
2012   Eric Scerri.com
2012   A Tale of 7 Elements
2012   Mnemonic Periodic Table Song
2012   Books on the Chemical Elements and the Periodic Table/System
2012   Three Different Long-Form, or 32-Column, Periodic Tables
2012   Airline Customer Review Periodic Table
2012   Four of Diamonds: A Pirate Story
2012   Scerri's Lecture on The Periodic Table
2012   Srivaths-Labarca's Periodic Table
2012   Scientific American: The Quest for the Periodic Table
2012   iPhone, Periodic Table of
2012   Eric Scerri Lecture, Dedicated to Fernando Dufour
2013   Classic Rock Periodic Chart
2013   London, Periodic Table of
2013   Scientific American Interactive Periodic Table
2013   4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table
2013   30 Second Elements
2013   Periodic Pyramid
2013   Bernard Periodic Spiral
2013   Alcohol, Periodic Table of
2013   Underground Map of the Elements
2013   Labarca & Zambon's Formulation
2014   Beatles, Periodic Table of
2014   Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony Periodic Table
2014   Breaking Bad Periodic Table
2014   Do Not Disturb
2014   Table Lab
2014   Zambon's Periodic Table Based on Triads
2014   Childhood, Periodic Table of
2014   Olympic Lifts, Periodic Table of
2014   Clock Periodic Table
2014   Musical Notation, Periodic Table of
2014   Phobias, Fears & Unspeakable Horrors, Periodic Table of
2015   Anomalous Electronic Structures
2015   Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements
2016   Triadic Networks
2016   Football, Periodic Table of (Book)
2016   Education Technology, Periodic Table of
2016   Pictures & Words
2016   Rejected Element Names, Periodic Table of
2017   New Rendering of ADOMAH Periodic Table
2017   Venn Diagram of the Chemical Elements and the United States
2018   Timelines, of The Periodic Table
2018   Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table (Extended)
2018   Race to Invent the Periodic Table
2018   Nawa–Scerri Octagonal Periodic System
2018   Nawa's 3-D Octagonal Pillar
2018   Scerri's Reverse Engineered Version of Mendeleev's Eight Column Table
2018   Mendeleev to Oganesson: A Multidisciplinary Perspective on the Periodic Table
2018   Places of the Periodic Table
2018   Superconductivity of Hydrides Periodic Table
2019   Setting The Table
2019   UCLA Periodic Table (Proposed)
2019   Möbius-Escher Periodic Table
2019   Kultovoy's Periodic Table Book
2019   Schaltenbrand's Helical Gathering of the Elements
2019   Poliakoff's Inverted Periodic Table
2019   Group 3 of The Periodic Table
2019   Meyer's NYT Graphic
2019   Where Mendeleev Was Wrong
2019   Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue: The Elements
2019   Mendeleev 150
2019   International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri
2019   C&EN No Agreement
2019   Weise's Tetrahedral Periodic Table
2019   Nature's IYPT Interactive Periodic Table
2019   Scerri's The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance 2nd Edition
2019   International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri
2019   Students, Periodic Table of
2019   Elemental Podcast
2019   Green & Sustainable Chemistry, Periodic Table of
2020   What Is A Chemical Element?
2020   Vernon's Periodic Table showing the Idealized Solid-State Electron Configurations of the Elements
2020   Scerri's Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements
2020   Scerri's Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements by ERS
2020   Workshop on Teaching 3d-4s Orbitals Presented by Dr. Eric Scerri
2020   Interview with Chemist, Dr. Eric Scerri
2021   150 Years of the Periodic Table
2021   Provisional Report on Discussions on Group 3 of The Periodic Table
2021   Eric Scerri's Articles, as Listed on Muck Rack
2021   Coronavirus, Periodic Table of: Elements of a Year We'll Never Forget
2021   World's Largest Periodic Table Created on ECU's Science Building
2021   Largest Periodic Table in Eurasia Created in Dubna
2021   History [of the] Elements and Periodic Table


1831

Daubeny's Teaching Display Board & Wooden Cubes of Atomic Weights

The Museum of the History of Science, Oxford, has a display of Charles Daubeny's teaching materials, including a black painted wooden board with "SYMBOLS OF SIMPLE BODIES": showing symbols, atomic weights and names of elements in two columns, and a small pile of cubes with element symbols.

Charles Daubeny and Chemistry at the Old Ashmolean

Charles Daubeny (1795-1867) was appointed Aldrichian Professor of Chemistry at Oxford in 1822. In 1847 he moved from the original laboratory in this basement [in the museum] to a new one built at his own expense at the Botanic Garden. His apparatus went with him and was preserved there. Daubeny actively campaigned for the teaching of science in Oxford and held several professorships in addition to chemistry. He also conducted research on subjects such as photosynthesis.

From the HSM Database (Inventory no. 17504):

DAUBENY'S LIST OF ATOMIC WEIGHTS Wooden panel, black with white lettering, listing in two columns the symbols and names of twenty elements. This lecture board is identical to the table in the third edition (1831) of E. Turner, 'Elements of Chemistry', apart from the atomic weight for bromine. Daubeny wrote a useful 'Introduction to the Atomic Theory' (published in three versions: 1831, 1840, and 1850), the first edition of which also quotes Turner's table. Probably contemporary with this lecture board are the wooden cubes with the symbols for certain elements.

The period from 1810 to 1860 was crucial in the development of the periodic table. Most of the main group and transition elements had been discovered, but their atomic weights and stoichiometries (combining ratios) had not been fully deduced. Oxygen was assumed to have a weight of 6, and consequently carbon is assumed to have a mass of 6.

Daubeny's element symbols and weights – along with the modern mass data – are tabulated:

Symbol Daubeny's Weight Modern Mass Data % error Stoichiometry Error
H 1 1 0%  
C 6 12 -100% factor of 2
O 8 16 -100% factor of 2
Si 8 28.1 -251% factor of 5 (?)
Al 10 27 -170% factor of 3
Mg 12 24.3 -103% factor of 2
N 14 14 0%  
S 16 32.1 -101% factor of 2
P 16 31 -94% factor of 2
Fl 19 19 0%  
Ca 20 40.1 -101% factor of 2
Na 24 23 4%  
Fe 28 55.8 -99% factor of 2
Cl 36 35.5 1%  
K 40 39.1 2%  
Cu 64 63.5 1%  
B 80 79.9 0%  
Pb 104 207 -99% factor of 2
I 124 127 -2%  
Hg 200 200.6 0%  

While quite a number of weights are close to the modern values, many are way out. However, the error is usually a stiotoimetric factor error.


From the HSM Database (Inventory no. 33732): SET OF WOODEN CUBES ILLUSTRATING ATOMIC WEIGHTS

Forty-two wooden cubes numbered 1-42, painted black with symbols for certain elements, compounds or radicals painted in white on the faces, together with the corresponding atomic, molecular or radical weights. The face markings appear in various combinations:

H C P Na Ca° S N K Fe K Na° Cy
1 6 16 24 28 16 14 40 28 48 32 26 48

A typical cube (no. 3) may be represented by the following figure. They present something of an enigma as their faces do not form an obvious pattern. The numbers indicate that there were 42 cubes. In style they are similar to the figures on the panel of atomic weights.

The cubes are listed in Daubeny's 1861 catalogue, p. 11 as: "Wooden cubes for illustrating atomic weight". [See D. R. Oldroyd, The Chemical Lectures at Oxford (1822-1854) of Charles Daubeny, M.D., F.R.S. Notes and Records of the Royal Society, vol. 33 (1979), pp. 217-259.]

This display was spotted by Eric Scerri who was visiting the museum with Mark Leach in 2010.

There is a virtual tour on the museum, and the above display is in the basement.

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1862

Meyer's Periodic System

In his book, The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction, Eric Scerri writes how Lothar Meyer devised a partial periodic tables consisting of 28 elements arranged in order of increasing atomic weight in which the elements were grouped into vertical columns according to their chemical valences:

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1864

Naquet's Families of Elements

According to Naquet’s 1864 textbook, Principes de Chimie, F. Savy, Paris, (updated by Eric Scerri):

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1866

Spectroscope Revelations

From Scientific American in 1866, an article by Henry Draper concerning "The Spectroscope and Its Revelations".

At the time there was no understanding how the spectra were generated but it was recognised that every element produced a unique spectrum. Over 35,000 stars are catalogued/identified by their "HD" [Henry Draper] numbers:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Also, thanks to Prof. Emeritus Robert J. Lancashire of The University of the West Indies for corrections & additional information.

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1867

Hinrichs' Programme of Atomechanics

Gustavus Detlef Hinrichs' spiral "Programme of Atomechanics". Programm der Atomechanik oder die Chemie eine Mechanik de Pantome, Augustus Hageboek, Iowa City, IA (1867).

Hinrichs' system is based on the relationship of what he called: "pantogens, with its atoms called panatoms, which explains the numerical relations of atomic weights and gives a simple classification of the elements."

This classification system culminated in 1867 in his spiral periodic table, which better clarified the groupings of elements. Hinrichs' classification, while distinctly different from the other periodic tables of this period, "seems to capture many of the primary periodicity relationships seen in the modern periodic table... it is not cluttered by attempts to show secondary kinship relationships." (Scerri)

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1868

Meyer's "Lost" Table of 1868

In his book, The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction, Eric Scerri writes how Lothar Meyer produced an expanded periodic system for his1868 textbook which contained 53 elements. Unfortunately, the table was misplaced by the publisher and was not appear until after his death in 1895:

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1885

Klieber's Cosmochemical Periodic Table

Klieber's qualitative synthesis of the general composition of celestial objects in the form of a plane periodic system following atomic numbers. His diagram is probably one of the earliest versions of a "cosmochemical periodic table". (The diagram below is clearly redrawn as it has a very modern style.)

I.A. Kleiber, Zh. Russ. Fiziko-Khim. Obshch (St. Petersburg) 1885, 17, 147-171.


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1896

Richards' Classification of The Elements

This is how the periodic table looked in 1896 in an article by Theodore Richards the pioneer of atomic weight measurement.

Notice all those elements at the bottom that could not be classified, explicitly listed including He and Ar :

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1904

Ramsay's Periodic Arrangement of The Elements

From from Scientific American in 1904,, an article by Sir William Ramsay discussing the Periodic Arrangement of The Element:

Redrawn by Mark Leach in 2019:

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1905

Werner's Arrangement

Werner's Arrangement is the first modern looking PT formulation. It appeared before the structure of the atom was known, before the importance of atomic number was recognised and before quantum mechanics had been developed.

Berichte der Deutschen Chemischen Gesellschaft (1905), 38, 914-21 and J. Chem. Soc., Abstr. 88, II, 308-9 1905:

From Quam & Quam's 1934 review paper.pdf

Eric Scerri comments that the interesting features are:

 

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1905

Gooch & Walker's Periodic System of The Elements

From a 1905 textbook by Gooch & Walker: Outlines of Inorganic Chemistry (see the Google Books scanned version pp273) comes an early 'right-step' periodic table. The formulation was reproduced in a 1917 textbook (lower image).

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1907

van den Broek Periodic Table 1

From Wikipedia: Antonius Johannes van den Broek (1870-1926) was a Dutch amateur physicist notable for being the first who realized that the number of an element in the periodic table (now called atomic number) corresponds to the charge of its atomic nucleus. The 1911 inspired the experimental work of Henry Moseley, who found good experimental evidence for it by 1913. van den Broek envisaged the basic building block to be the 'alphon', which weighed twice as much as a hydrogen atom.

Read more in Chapter 4, Antonius Van Den Broek, Moseley and the Concept of Atomic Number by Eric Scerri. This chapter can be found in the book: For Science, King & Country: The Life and Legacy of Henry Moseley (Edited by Roy MacLeod, Russell G Egdell and Elizabeth Bruton).

van den Broek's periodic table of 1907: Annalen der Physik, 4 (23), (1907), 199-203

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1911

van den Broek's Periodic Table 2

From Wikipedia: Antonius Johannes van den Broek (1870-1926) was a Dutch amateur physicist notable for being the first who realized that the number of an element in the periodic table (now called atomic number) corresponds to the charge of its atomic nucleus. The 1911 inspired the experimental work of Henry Moseley, who found good experimental evidence for it by 1913. van den Broek envisaged the basic building block to be the 'alphon', which weighed twice as much as a hydrogen atom.

Read more in Chapter 4, Antonius Van Den Broek, Moseley and the Concept of Atomic Number by Eric Scerri. This chapter can be found in the book: For Science, King & Country: The Life and Legacy of Henry Moseley (Edited by Roy MacLeod, Russell G Egdell and Elizabeth Bruton).

van den Broek's periodic table of 1907: Annalen der Physik, 4 (23), (1907), 199-203

van den Broek's periodic table of 1911: Physikalische Zeitschrift, 12 (1911), 490-497); and also a paper in Nature the same year entitled: The Number of Possible Elements and Mendeléff's "Cubic" Periodic System, Nature volume 87, page 78 (20 July 1911)

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1913

van den Broek's Periodic Table 3

From Wikipedia: Antonius Johannes van den Broek (1870-1926) was a Dutch amateur physicist notable for being the first who realized that the number of an element in the periodic table (now called atomic number) corresponds to the charge of its atomic nucleus. The 1911 inspired the experimental work of Henry Moseley, who found good experimental evidence for it by 1913. van den Broek envisaged the basic building block to be the 'alphon', which weighed twice as much as a hydrogen atom.

Read more in Chapter 4, Antonius Van Den Broek, Moseley and the Concept of Atomic Number by Eric Scerri. This chapter can be found in the book: For Science, King & Country: The Life and Legacy of Henry Moseley (Edited by Roy MacLeod, Russell G Egdell and Elizabeth Bruton).

van den Broek's periodic table of 1907: Annalen der Physik, 4 (23), (1907), 199-203

van den Broek's periodic table of 1911: Physikalische Zeitschrift, 12 (1911), 490-497); and also a paper in Nature the same year entitled: The Number of Possible Elements and Mendeléff's "Cubic" Periodic System, Nature volume 87, page 78 (20 July 1911)

van den Broek's periodic table of 1913: Physikalische Zeitschrift, 14, (1913), 32-41

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1915

Crehore's Periodic System

[Part of] Crehore's periodic system, with the electronic configurations of the atoms, from Crehore, Gyroscopic Theory, p 323 (1915).

Crehore adopted Rydberg's ordinal number, implying the existance of two elements between hydrogen and helium.

Note the absence of groups VI and VII and that beryllium is shown as "Gl", glacinium.

From H. Kragh, Resisting the Bohr Atom, Perspectives in Physics, 13, (2011), 4-35:

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1916

Dushman's Periodic Table

By Dushman et al., a take on Mendeleeve's Periodic System:

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1919

Hackh's Classification of the Elements, Updated

From a Scientific American in March 1919, an article by Ingo W. D. Hackh discussing the classification of the elements.

Shown is a periodic table slightly updated from a version from two years before, and referenced by Quam & Quam:

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1919

Hackh's Periodic Spiral

From a Scientific American in March 1919, an article by Ingo W. D. Hackh discussing the classification of the elements.

Included is a periodic spiral, developed from Hackh's 1914 version:

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1919

Hackh's Periodic Chain

From a Scientific American in March 1919, an article by Ingo W. D. Hackh discussing the classification of the elements.

Included is a periodic chain showing the redox states of the elements:

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1920

Black & Conant's Periodic Classification Of The Elements

From N.H. Black NH & J.B. Conant's Practical Chemistry: Fundamental Facts and Applications to Modern Life, MacMillan, New York (1920)

Eric Scerri, who provided this formulation writes (personal communication):

"Notice conspicuous absence of H. And, Conant was the person who gave Kuhn his first start in the history of science at Harvard."

René Vernon tells us that Conant and his coauthor write:

"The position of H in the system has been a matter of some discussion, but it is not of much consequence. It seems to be rather an odd element. Perhaps the best place for it is in group IA as it forms a positive ion." (p. 350)

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1925

Courtines' A Model of the Periodic Table or Periodic Classification

Published in J. Chem. Ed., 2, 2, 107-109 in 1925 by M. Courtines of the Laboratory of Experimental Physics, College of France, Paris.

We do not know the date of the forth image (below), but it looks as if it was prepared a few years later. However, it is a 'top down' view of the 3D formulation.

Courtines 3D PT

Courtines PT

Courtines classification

From Quam & Quam's 1934 review paper.pdf

Courtines classification

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1925

Sommerfeld's Electon Filling Diagram

Arnold Sommerfeld diagram appears in an issue of Memoirs and Proceedings of the manchester Literary and Philosophical Society for 1925-26. volume 70, p. 141-151.

Eric Scerri writes:

"The electron groupings are not exactly the same as what is believed to exist today but it amounts to the same order of filling. For example p orbitals were thought to consist of two groups of 2 and 4 electrons, rather than 2, 2, 2 as believed today. Similarly d orbitals were thought to be formed of two groups of 4 and 6 electrons. With that in mind you will see that Sommerfeld was the first to propose an aufbau filling system: The occupation of 4s before 3d or as represented here the 2 electrons in orbit 11 followed by the 4 and 6 from orbits 3,s and 3,3.

"Sommerfeld does indicate sub-shells. They are just not the same groupings as the current ones. For example 2,1 and 2,2 indicates subshells within the 2nd main shell. Similarly the 3rd shell is presented as 3,2 and 3,3. The totals are of course the same, namely 6 for what we now call p orbitals and 10 for what we call d orbitals. All this came before the discovery of the 4th or spin quantum number. This is in keeping with Bohr's original assignment of shells and sub-shells.

"The discovery of sub-structure to electron shells was not an 'all or nothing' development, but a gradual and almost organic evolution."

Eric has a new book out – A Tale of Seven Scientists and a New Philosophy of Science – in which the gradual evolution of electronic structure involving Bohr, Sommerfeld, Bury, Main Smith, Pauli and others is traced out.

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1926

Hopkins' Nearly Completed Periodic Table of The Elements

From a Scientific American of March 1927, an article by B.S. Hopkins discussing the building blocks of the universe.

Included is The Nearly Completed [Hubbard Type] Periodic Table of the Elements from 1926.

As Eric Scerri pointed out: "Notice element, 43, masurium, according to Noddack, Noddack and Berg, and later synthesized as Tc":

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1928

Riesenfeld Periodic Table

From here, using Google Translate:

This table is from the book "Practical Inorganic Chemistry" Publisher EH Riesenfeld Labor, Barcelona (1950). It is a reprint of the second edition (1943) which in turn is a translation of a German edition, its seventh edition in 1928. This suggests that Riesenfeld is himself the author of it.

It is a pre-Seaborg table in the sense that the actinides are known throughout the period July. It also does not include the Tc since it was discovered in 1937. These facts support the dating of the table. But the most interesting thing about it is that to make the separation between subgroups and major groups Be cut after the first period and after the Al in the second. Which leaves isolated in group B without any element 2b below it:

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1930

Nekrasov Periodic Table

From here, using Google Translate:

The shape of the table is presented by Bohr effect of considering the properties of the elements as simple substances and for reactions to occur with the intervention of such substances. But for the study of compounds and reactions that occur between them, the key factor is the electron configurations of atoms in states of valence to them on the given compounds.

It follows that a more complete picture of the periodic table would be when you take into account the peculiarities of atoms in both its neutral state and in all its particular valence states. This is the proposal of Boris Nekrasov, a member of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow.

Nekrasov distinguishes three types of analogies between elements Total analogs are those in which the analogy is shown in all its valence, all analogs compared to the valence valences except for the group corresponding to the number that can be called characteristic and analogous to the valence characteristic .

Thus, in the table shown here distinguish the elements entirely analogous joined by continuous lines, such as Na and K.

Those analogies in all except the characteristic valences joined by dotted lines. This is the case of Na and Cu in both cases if you lose an electron (valence feature) your setup is different. In the first case is 8 (1s2, 2P6) and the second 18 (3s2, 3p6, 3d10).

Lastly presenting exclusively analogies valence are connected with dashed lines. This is the case both S and Cr +6 elements have their valence electron configuration similar in the last layer 8 (2s2, 2p6) for the S and 8 (3s2, 3p6) for Cr.

The date 1930 is an educated guess:

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1942

Paneth's Table

Published by Paneth in 1942 in an article in Nature in which he suggests that newly discovered elements such as Z = 43 should be given names by their discoverers. The other highlighted elements (below) had also not yet been named.

Element 43 had been discovered 9 years earlier but had not been given an official name because there was reluctance to consider synthetic elements on the same footing as naturally occurring ones. This changed as a result of Paneth's article.

For more information see Eric Scerri's, A Tale of Seven Elements, OUP, 2013.

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1948

Hakala's Electronic Orbital Filling

Hakala, R.W., Letter to The Editor, J. Chem. Ed. 25, 229, 1948



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1951

Tomkeieff's Periodic Table Formulation Formula

A short letter to Nature in which Tomkeieff gives a formula to generate the periodic table:

Phobia

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1960

Sistema Periodico Degli Elementi

An Italian Periodic Table in Science Museum, Turin (Estimated date 1960).

Note how the noble gases (as Group 0) are shown down the left hand side of the table:

 

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1961

Chaverri's Tabla Periodica de Los Elementos

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1970

Luder's Atomic-Structure Chart of the Elements

W.F. Luder, The Atomic-Structure Chart of the Elements, Canadian Chemical Education, April 1970, pp13-16.

Eric Scerri writes:

"A very nice article from 1970. This deals with the group 3 question in a very dear and simple fashion."

"I corresponded with the author in the 1980s. Also, I have always wondered where Jensen got some of his information for his article on group 3. I think it's from this and other articles by Luder. He published a number of articles in Journal of Chemical Education."

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1975

Primo Levi's Elements

Primo Levi's elements, from his book The Periodic Table:



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1975

Russian Periodic Table(s)

Eric Scerri writes:

"The periodic tables [below], and data, are from some Russian books given to me by the late Ray Hefferlin, when I visited him a few years ago in Tennessee. Sorry, I can't give any source details as the inserts got separated from the book."

The captions say: "Fig. XVII. Block-type periodic table" and "U.L.Kulakov, Classification of the chemical elements on the new background".

Looking at the graphics style, we are guessing they date from the mid-1970s (MRL)

Courtines 3D PT

Courtines PT

Courtines classification

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1987

Elsevier's Periodic Table of the Elements

Prepared by P. Lof is Elsevier's Periodic Table of the Elements.

This educational wall chart features the periodic table of the elements supported by a wealth of chemical, physical, thermodynamical, geochemical and radiochemical data laid down in numerous colourful graphs, plots, figures and tables. The most important chemical and physical properties of the elements can be found - without turning a page.

All properties are presented in the form of tables or graphs. More than 40 properties are given, ranging from melting point and heat capacity to atomic radius, nuclear spin, electrical resistivity and abundance in the solar system. Sixteen of the most important properties are colour coded, so that they may be followed through the periodic system at a glance. Twelve properties have been selected to illustrate periodicity, while separate plots illustrate the relation between properties. In addition, there are special sections dealing with units, fundamental constants and particles, radioisotopes, the Aufbau principle, etc. All data on the chart are fully referenced, and S.I. units are used throughout.

Designed specifically for university and college undergraduates and high school students, "Elsevier's Periodic Table of the Elements" will also be of practical value to professionals in the fields of fundamental and applied physical sciences and technology. The wall chart is ideally suited for self-study and may be used as a complementary reference for textbook study and exam preparation.



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1989

Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table

The Physicist's Periodic Table by Timothy Stowe is a well know formulation for those interested in such things, but for a long time its origin was been lost. Eric Scerri has rediscovered the original formulation: a 1989 publication by the company Instruments Research and Industry (I2R) Inc:



 

From Wikipedia, this Stowe Format Periodic Table is Based on a graphic from Scholten J."Secret Lanthanides", 2005, ISBN 90-74817-16-5;

Eric Scerri has developed an updated version of the Stowe formulation, here.

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1990

Dufour's Periodic Tree

The Dufour Periodictree periodic table formulation, from here:

 

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1991

Non-Scientist's Periodic Table

By John T Hortenstine Jr. of the R.W. Johnson Pharmaceutical Research Institute, The Non-Scientists Concept of the Periodic Table of the Elements, for example "Zirconium, in Fake Diamonds", etc.

Click here for the big version.

Non Scientist PT

Non Scientist PT

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1992

Fet's Periodic Tables

Two periodic tables by A.I. Fet from his book, "Mathematical Modeling in Biology and Chemistry. New Approach" Nauka, Sib.Dep., 1992.

Larry Tsimmerman writes:

"First formulation, Tab. 7, is precursor of Adomah PT with broken Z-sequence and questionable pairing of elements in accordance with "ml". Tab. 8 is a Janet LST shown vertically. Fet discusses Periodic Table in the light of Group Theory. (The book was sent to me by Eric Scerri and it was signed by Fet for Hefferlin)."

 

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1994

f-Block Elements 3D Periodic Table

From conference in Helsinki on the f-Block Elements to commemorate the bicentennial of Johan Gadolin's 1794 analysis of Yittria.

Pekka Pykkö writes to say:

"We used [this formulation] in Helsinki in 1994 on the cover of ICFE-2 conference proceedings. Who invented it or where it was copied from, I do not know. Anyway, all the hundreds of participants received it from us":

Claude Piguet's paper, Chimia 73 (2019) 165–172, also uses this 3D version of the standard periodic table. The text says: "Periodic table highlighting the location of Rare Earths (red elements). The elements shown in blue correspond to the actinide series":

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1997

Bayley-Thomsen-Bohr Periodic Table

A formulation adapted by Eric Scerri from tables developed by Thomas Bayley, Jørgen Thomsen and Neils Bohr that depicts the symmetrical nature of the periodic law.

Eric Scerri, The Evolution of the Periodic System, American Scientist, November-December issue, 1997, 546-553

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2000

MIT Periodic Table Characters

Eric Scerri writes:

"This apparently hangs on a wall of Building 6 at MIT. I have identified the people around the old-school periodic table, they are (from left to right): Zosimos, Ko Hung, Jabir, Boyle, Lomonosov, Lavoisier, Berzelius, Wohler, Cannizzaro, Berthelot & Mendeleev":

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2006

Eric Scerri's Triad Periodic Table

Eric Scerri says, "I have recently developed a new periodic table with some very nice features. I am now shifting my allegiance from the left-step table to this one."

Read the paper on the philosophy of science web site.

Eric Scerri, The Periodic Table: Its Story and Its Significance, Oxford University Press, 2006. Read an interview with the author, here, and a review of the book here.

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2006

Eric Scerri's The Periodic Table & Its Significance

Eric Scerri, The Periodic Table: Its Story and Its Significance, Oxford University Press, 2006. Read an interview with the author, here, and a review of the book here.

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2008

Periodic Table Radio Show "The Music of Matter"

Periodic Table Radio Show "The Music of Matter" featuring John Emsley, Oliver Sacks & Eric Scerri

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2009

Scerri's Selected Papers on The Periodic Table

Edited by Eric Scerri (University of California, Los Angeles, USA)

Published by: Imperial College Press in London

The book contains key articles by Eric Scerri, the leading authority on the history and philosophy of the periodic table of the elements. These articles explore a range of topics such as the historical evolution of the periodic system as well as its philosophical status and its relationship to modern quantum physics. In this present volume, many of the more in-depth research papers, which formed the basis for this publication, are presented in their entirety; they have also been published in highly accessible science magazines (such as American Scientist), and journals in history and philosophy of science, as well as quantum chemistry. This must-have publication is completely unique as there is nothing of this form currently available on the market.

Contents:


Readership: Academic readers: philosophers and science historians, science educators, chemists and physicists.
200pp (approx.) Pub. date: Scheduled Fall 2009

200pp (approx.) Pub. date: Scheduled Fall 2009
ISBN 978-1-84816-425-3
1-84816-425-4 US$88 / £66

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2010

Periodic Arch of The Elements

Cynthia K. Whitney of Galilean Electrodynamics writes: "In his paper Explaining the periodic table, and the role of chemical triad, Eric Scerri mentioned the existence of at least four different candidate places for Hydrogen: Group 1 (alkali metals - Lithium, etc.), Group 17 (halogens - Fluorine, etc.), Group 14 (Carbon, etc.), or off the Periodic Table entirely, because it is so odd! The four-fold multiplicity (and maybe more) of candidate places for Hydrogen triggered in me the following thought: the excessive multiplicity of candidate places may have to do with the rectangular nature of the Periodic Tables under consideration there." Read more in this pdf file.

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2010

Before & After Mendeleev: Periodic Table Videos

Two videos by the Chemical Heritage Foundation:

The videos feature interviews with Dr. Eric Scerri of UCLA, with added narration, animations, illustrations, photos, captions, etc. by David V. Black as well as publication artwork and notes by Edward G. Mazurs.



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2010

Scandium Group and The Periodic Table: Sc, Y, Lu, Lr   or   Sc, Y, La, Ac?

Pieter Thyssen and Koen Binnemans discuss (CRC Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, Chapter 248. Accommodation of the Rare Earths in the Periodic Table: A Historical Analysis) the confusion surrounding the members of and the positioning of the scandium group. There are three forms commonly used.

A medium-long form and long form depiction of the 15LaAc periodic table. As should be clear from the long form periodic table, an intermingling occurs between the f-block and d-block:

 

A medium-long form and long form depiction of the 14CeTh periodic table. The d-block has been torn apart in the long form, due to the insertion of the f-block:

 

A medium-long form and long form depiction of the 14LaAc periodic table. The 14LaAc periodic table is in perfect agreement with the Madelung rule:

A recent graphic posted by Eric Scerri:

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2010

Science Museum Lockers

From Kotaku:

While visiting the Nagoya City Science Museum, Twitter user Kantaku noticed something very cool, the coin lockers.

The name of each element is written below each symbol in Japanese, allowing visitors to store their belongings in Helium, Calcium, Oxygen, Potassium and more.

The number of each locker corresponds to the element. So, locker 21 is Scandium as it's the twenty-first element on the periodic table. Locker 3? It's Lithium, like it is on the periodic table, and so on. Dibs on Krypton!

Science Museum Lockers

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2011

Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table

Eric Scerri made contact, writing: "Following the discussions on Periodic Table debate on the Chemistry Views website here, and as a result of recent turns, I have developed a new periodic table which I believe combines virtues of the Stowe table and also the Janet left-step table. I propose the name Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table. The explanation is posted on the Chemistry Views debate pages.

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2011

Homenatge Als Elements

From Eugènia Balcells' blog (and translated using Google Translate):

TRIBUTE TO THE ELEMENTS was born as a counterpoint to the video-installation Eugènia Balcells often, a film without end where the trace elements that each emit light merges with the other and forming a true metaphor for origin of the universe.

Coinciding with the International Year of Chemistry, TRIBUTE TO THE ELEMENTS has been published in two formats: a poster in which each element is represented by its chemical symbol and its own emission spectrum and a version where each element, printed separately, part of a collection that can be stored as such or are available as a mural on a temporary or permanent exhibition space, as presented in the exposure:

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2011

Dufour's Periodic Tree: Two Short Films

Elsewhere in this database we can see the 1990 Dufour's Periodic Tree, now two short films have been made about this 3D formulation, here & here:

Eric Scerri Letter from Ben Ged Low on Vimeo.

 

Five Foot 3D Model from Ben Ged Low on Vimeo.

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2011

Scerri's Very Short Introduction To The Periodic Table

A book by Eric Scerri, The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction.

very short introduction

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2012

Eric Scerri.com

ericscerri.com is the personal internet domain and website of Eric Scerri: chemist and leading philosopher of science specializing in the history and philosophy of the periodic table. He is founder and editor-in-chief of the international journal Foundations of Chemistry, which publishes academic papers concerned with the PT, and is the author of the respected book: The Periodic Table and Its Significance (Oxford University Press, 2007).

The website has links to all of Eric's extensive publications, including online video lectures and interviews and external links.

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2012

A Tale of 7 Elements

A new book by Eric Scerri: A Tale of 7 Elements about seven 'missing' elements: protactinium, hafnium, rhenium, technetium, francium, astatine, promethium:

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2012

Mnemonic Periodic Table Song

By Ballroom Jam, a mnemonic song to help memorise the chemical elements:



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2012

Books on the Chemical Elements and the Periodic Table/System

From Eric Scerri's forthcoming book A Tale of Seven Elements (Oxford University Press, 2013) and used by permission of the author, is the most complete and up-to-date list of Books on the Chemical Elements and the Periodic Table/System, including some titles in foreign languages.

Additional books in other languages can be found listed in Mazurs, 1974

Works by D. I. Mendeleev

 

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2012

Three Different Long-Form, or 32-Column, Periodic Tables

From an article by Eric Scerri in the IUPAC magazine, Chemistry International, in which three different long-form, or 32-column, periodic tables with differences highlighted.

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2012

Airline Customer Review Periodic Table

A Periodic Table ranking Airlines by eDreams Customer reviews. Find your favorite way to fly:

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2012

Four of Diamonds: A Pirate Story

From the Creative Output blog, "Jim was a respectable middle-aged man who suddenly became a pirate. He didn't just start downloading art in ways contrary to the artists' wishes. He actually became a pirate. One minute he was looking at cat pictures on the internet at work, the next he was standing on an enemy ship, with a cutlass in one hand and a hook on the other...":

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2012

Eric Scerri's Lecture on The Periodic Table

A lecture by Eric Scerri at the Oscar Peterson auditorium of Concordia University, in Montreal.

The topic is the history and iconic nature of the Periodic Table, in high quality video, about one hour:

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2012

Srivaths–Labarca Periodic Table

This is an improved version of the Zigzag Periodic Table (2012). In this new arrangement the main criteria proposed to settle the placement of the elements hydrogen and helium has been taken into account: electronic configurations, the number of electrons needed to fill the outer-shell, chemical behavior, and triads of atomic number.

This is a new categorial criterion recently proposed by Eric Scerri, according to which hydrogen and helium form part of the triads H(1), F(9), Cl(17) and He(2), Ne(10), Ar(18), respectively. Thus, hydrogen preserves its place between alkali metals and halogen while helium is now in between noble gases and alkaline earth elements.

This periodic table allows visualizing easily the relationships of hydrogen and of helium with the different criteria, avoiding drawing lines to see them in contrast to other similar periodic systems.

Akash Srivaths, Chennai, India
Martn Labarca, CONICET & National University of Quilmes, Argentina

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2012

Scientific American: The Quest for the Periodic Table

From Scientific American, a series of original articles (scanned) dealing with the development of the periodic table dating from 1861 to 1998.

Edited by Eric Scerri.

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2012

iPhone, Periodic Table of

An article in Scientific American Digging for Rare Earths: The Mines Where iPhones Are Born.

"About 60 miles southwest of Las Vegas, in a mine some 500 feet deep, the beginnings of an iPhone come to life. But the sleek, shiny iPhone is far, far removed from the rocks pulled out of this giant hole, which looks like a deep crater on the moon. Inside the rocks from this mine are rare-earth minerals, crucial ingredients for iPhones, as well as wind turbines, hybrid cars, and night-vision goggles. Minerals such as neodymium are used in magnets that make speakers vibrate to create sound. Europium is a phosphor that creates a bright red on an iPhone screen. Cerium gets put into a solvent that workers use to polish devices as they move along the assembly line, etc.":

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2012

Eric Scerri Lecture, Dedicated to Fernando Dufour

Dr. Eric Scerri from the Chemistry Department at UCLA giving a distinguished invited lecture at the Oscar Peterson auditorium of Concordia University, in Montreal. The topic is the history and iconic nature of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Classic Rock Periodic Chart

A Periodic Chart of Classic Rock by Van Dieman... look more closely:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
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2013

London, Periodic Table of

Like the Tube Map, the Periodic Table is an endlessly fascinating thing. Over the years, the format has been adapted to all kinds of schemes. A few years ago, we tried to make sense of London in this way, by arranging important facets of the capital into rows and columns. It's been a while, so we've now updated it, with a few changed entries and a general tidy up. Can you work out the identity of each London 'element'? Can you spot hidden patterns and trends? Can you suggest improvements?

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2013

Scientific American Interactive Periodic Table

From Scientific American, The Elements Revealed: An Interactive Periodic Table.

Many elements have links with articles on individual elements which first appeared in Nature Chemistry and were not previously available on-line:

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2013

4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table

By Jgmoxness

"I've replaced the standard periodic table in the 7th "Chemistry Pane" of my E8 visualizer with a 2D/3D/4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri version of the Periodic Table."

"Interestingly, it has 120 elements, which is the number of vertices in the 600 Cell or the positive half of the 240 E8 roots. It is integrated into VisibLie_E8 so clicking on an element adds that particular atomic number's E8 group vertex number to the 3rd E8 visualizer pane. The code is a revision and extension of Enrique Zeleny's Wolfram Demonstration":

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2013

30 Second Elements

30 Second Elements The 50 most significant elements, each explained in half a minute. A book Edited by Eric Scerri and published by Ivy Press.

"30 Second Elements presents you with the foundations of chemical knowledge, distilling the 50 most significant chemical elements into half-a-minute individual entries, using nothing more than two pages, 300 words and one picture. Divided into seven chapters, it includes the atomic details of the other 68 elements and the relationships of all 118, as well as biographies of the chemists who transformed scientific knowledge and unlocked the mysteries of life itself. Illustrated with explosive graphics, here is the quickest way to know your arsenic from your europium".

The curator of this website is a contributor:

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2013

Periodic Pyramid

A Periodic Pyramid by Jennifer N. Hennigan and W. Tandy Grubbs * Department of Chemistry, Stetson University, DeLand, Florida 32723, United States

J. Chem. Educ., 2013, 90 (8), pp 1003-1008 DOI: 10.1021/ed3007567 Publication Date (Web): June 21, 2013

The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy the shells identified by the principle quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The numbers 2, 8, 18, and 32 are shown in this work to be related to the triangular numbers from mathematical number theory. The relationship to the triangular numbers, in turn, suggests an alternate method for arranging elements in terms of periodicity. The resulting three-dimensional "periodic pyramid" is highly symmetric in shape. Just as is true in the modern periodic table, each layer of the periodic pyramid can be separated into shell and subshell contributions. Examining the pyramid's structure is arguably a pedagogically useful activity for college-level introductory or physical chemistry students, as it provides an opportunity to further ponder the shell model of the atom and the origins of periodicity. The connections to number theory are used to show that the outermost subshell of a given shell contains (2n - 1) orbitals.

<Periodic Pyramid>

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2013

Bernard Periodic Spiral

The Bernard Periodic Spiral of the Elements (BPSE), depicts a novel rendition of the Periodic Table that replaces the flat rectangular format with a continuous unidirectional spiral that maintains all the properties of Group and Period formation.

Comparisons may be made with similar models spanning the last three decades of the 20th century (Alexander, 1971; Mazurs, 1974; & Kaufman, 1999).

In the chart form, this new rendition is referred to as the Elliptical Periodic Chart of the Elements. In the three-dimensional form, the model resembles a Christmas tree in shape with the 7 Periods represented as circular platforms situated at various levels with the elements placed appropriately at the outer edges of each of these platforms as a Period builds up. The elements may be represented as spherical objects or flat discs with radii proportionate to atomic radii (or reasonable approximations). Color schemes accentuate the four different Blocks of elements: the s-Block (green), the p-Block (blue, with the exception that the last Group is red signifying the end of a Period), d-Block (orange), and the f-Block (yellow). The grey section, called the Group-Period Interchange, is where the end of a particular Period connects to the beginning of the next Period, and, at the same time, transitions from Group 18 to Group 1.

Watch the video here:

<Bernard Periodic Spiral>

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2013

Alcohol, Periodic Table of

From visual.ly, a Periodic Table of Alcohol. Click here for full size:

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

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2013

Underground Map of the Elements

By Dr Mark Lorch of the University of Hull, an Underground Map of the Elements.

From here: "My son loves trains. So I came up with a train related twist to an inspection of the periodic table. We sat and cut up a copy of the table and then rearranged each element as a 'station' on an underground rail system. Each line represents a characteristic shared by the elements on that line":

Underground Map of the Elements

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2013

Labarca & Zambon's Formulation

Labarca & Zambon's new representation of the periodic system.

A reconceptualization of the element concept as a basis for a new representation of the periodic system, Martín Labarca and Alfio Zambon, Educ. Quím., 24(1), 63-70, 2013.

"The aim of this paper is to propose a new conceptualization of the term 'element' as the basis for a new representation of the periodic system. For this purpose we begin by recalling the dual sense of the concept of element. Next, we develop the 'limits isotopes' argument which is the basis of the new periodic chart. This task leads us both to reconceptualize the notion of element and to characterize the term 'basic substance'. In turn, the argument is used to face the epistemological problem with hydrogen and helium in the periodic table. Finally, the Döbereiner's triads are used to calculate atomic masses in three periodic charts: the medium-long-form, the modified 'left-step' proposed by Scerri, and the proposed in this work. Evaluation results allows us to stand out the fruitful predictive power of our periodic system.

"The 46 blocks of elements are ordered vertically by the increasing number of neutrons of the lighter isotope (primary criterion) and, horizontally, by the increasing atomic number (secondary criterion). The subscript represents the value of L - Z and the superscript the value of Z."

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2014

Beatles, Periodic Table of

A periodic table of the Beatles, from dotmund:

Beatles PT

 

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2014

Winter Olympics Opening Ceremony Periodic Table

From the 2014 Winter Olympics Opening ceremony, a Russian periodic table. See the whole video on RuTube.

Olympic PT

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2014

Breaking Bad Periodic Table

More Breaking Bad PT images:

Breaking Bad

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
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2014

Do Not Disturb

From a hotel in Boston:

Do Not Disturb

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2014

Table Lab

The Table Lab with several Periodic Tables:

Animal, Cat, Christmas, Crayon, Dinosaur, Dog, Farm, Mixology, Sushi Bar & USA... as well as Classic:

Table Lab

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2014

Zambon's Periodic Table Based on Triads

Alfio Zambon – Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia

1. Introduction

In the last decades, the notion of triad has been recovered by Eric Scerri, who suggested it as a possible categorical criterion to represent chemical periodicity. In particular, he reformulates the notion of triad in terms of atomic number instead of atomic weights and, in this way, the value of the intermediate term of the triad is the exact average of the values of the two extremes. The author notes that the attempt of finding new triads is very important since this relation is based exclusively on the atomic number, that is, the only feature of the elements considered as basic substances. In this work, I will follow Scerri's general proposal.

Read the full paper here (pdf):

Words Periodic Table

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2014

Childhood, Periodic Table of

Sold by Etsy, a Periodic Table of Childhood:

Childhood

Childhood

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2014

Olympic Lifts, Periodic Table of

By wiseguyremotetraining.com and posted on Pinterest, a Periodic Table of Olympic Lifts:

Olympic Lifts

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2014

Clock Periodic Table

Prof. Martyn Poliakoff of the University of Nottingham, and star of the Periodic Videos YouTube Channel, explains how he was given a periodic table clock by a Japanese School teacher... which he likes very much:

Clock PT

 

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2014

Musical Notation, Periodic Table of

From the Tone Deaf Store, a Periodic Table of Musical Notation:

Musical Notation

Musical Notation

Musical Notation

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2014

Phobias, Fears & Unspeakable Horrors, Periodic Table of

From ShirtWOOT, a Periodic Table of Phobias, Fears, and Unspeakable Horrors that uses the actual elemental symbols rather well:

Phobia

Unspeakable Horror

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2015

Anomalous Electronic Structures

Eric Scerri has supplied two periodic tables showing "anomalous configurations for gas phase atoms, highlighted in yellow, and for condensed phase atoms, purple." (The f-block anomalies for condensed phase are yet to be calculated.)

Read more in Eric's short article for the RSC.

Anomalous Electronic Structures

Anomalous Electronic Structures

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2015

Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements is a multimedia project about one of the great adventures in the history of science: the long (and continuing) quest to understand what the world is made of – to identify, understand and organize the basic building blocks of matter. In a nutshell, the project is about the human story behind the Periodic Table of the Elements.

The centerpiece of the project is a three-hour series that premieres Aug. 19, 2015 on PBS. The Mystery of Matter introduces viewers to some of history's most extraordinary scientists:

The Mystery of Matter will show not only what these scientific explorers discovered but also how, using actors to reveal the creative process through the scientists' own words, and conveying their landmark discoveries through re-enactments shot with replicas of their original lab equipment. Knitting these strands together into a coherent, compelling whole is host Michael Emerson, a two-time Emmy Award-winning actor best known for his roles on Lost and Person of Interest. Eric Scerri appears as the expert.

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2016

Triadic Networks

From orijikan.com: a great summary paper by Dr. Eric Scerri on the role of triads in evolution of the periodic table and a paper by Dr. Alfio Zambon inspired this work. Here is my contribution: the Triadic Networks (TN), which is a general mathematical design, and the Triadic Elemental Networks (TEN), that apply that design to chemical elements. For a full discussion, read the pdf here.

triad networks

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2016

Football, Periodic Table of (Book)

A book called: The Periodic Table of Football by Nick Holt, available on Amazon. Click here for a larger version of the periodic table.

 

 

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2016

Education Technology, Periodic Table of

From Daily Genius, a Periodic Table of Education Technology:

Periodic Table of Education Technology

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2016

Pictures & Words

A couple of periodic tables from Keith Enevoldsen with information shown in Pictures & Words:

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
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2016

Rejected Element Names, Periodic Table of

A periodic table of rejected element names by Andy Brunning's Compound Interest:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
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2017

New Rendering of ADOMAH Periodic Table

From Valery Tsimmerman, of the PerfectPeriodicTable.com and the ADOMAH Periodic Table:

"I received email from Dr. Marcus Wolf who is a chemist, working on renewable energy and electrochemical storage in Germany, near Nuremberg. He also lectures at Georg Simon Ohm, Technische Hochschule Nürnberg. Attached to his email was new version of ADOMAH Periodic Table that he created. In this new rendering he is using Jensen's Valence Manifold (VM)."

This is what Dr. Marcus Wolf wrote:

"The first one to come up with the idea of using a valence manifold VM = [e + v] as a label for the groups, was Will B. Jensen. He derived it from the very early attempts of Richard Abegg, who, at around 1904, brought up the hypothesis of 'main- and counter-valences', derived from the observable behavior of elements and their compounds in electrochemical experiments. Eric Scerri is citing Jensen in his latest book, in the chapter about Richard Abegg. But Jensen's proper article from 1983 or so is far more detailed and in his later publications he then introduces the valence manifold concept. Last weekend I accidentally observed another consistency between the G-values and their ordering and the valence electron counts, e. If you fix the e value of the starting group in a given l-block as e(initial), you could generate every G-number of a given group by adding the valence vacancy count, v, to it:

G = e(initial) + v.

"That is another hint for the consistency of the VM labelling concept."

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2017

Venn Diagram of the Chemical Elements and the United States

A rather nice Venn diagram showing the intersection of the chemical element symbols and the States of the Union (based on an origional found at I Love Charts):



Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed
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2018

Timelines, of The Periodic Table

By Steven Murov, a chronology of the events that have resulted in our present periodic table of the elements and a celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Mendeleev (birthday, 02/08/1834) periodic table (1869).

Recursively, the Murov website has many links to this [Chemogenesis] website.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2018

Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table (Extended)

Stowe's A Physicist's Periodic Table was published in 1989, and is a famous & well respected formulation of the periodic table.

Since 1989 quite a number of elements have been discovered and Jeries A. Rihani has produced an updated and extended version in 2017. This has been further updated, below. Click for the full size .pdf version:

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2018

Race to Invent the Periodic Table

From PBS Digital Studios, a short-but-fast-moving video about the development of the periodic table during the 19th century, and a discussion about gallium:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2018

Nawa–Scerri Octagonal Periodic System

A spiral periodic table formulation by Nawa, called the Nawa–Scerri Octagonal Periodic System.

Click here for a larger version:

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2018

Nawa's 3-D Octagonal Pillar

A 3-D octagonal pillar periodic table model by Nawa, "acccording to Scerri's reverse engineering [of] Mendeleev's 8-column table":

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2018

Scerri's Reverse Engineered Version of Mendeleev's Eight Column Table

Eric Scerri has updated – reverse engineered – the classic Mendeleev Table, here, here & here:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2018

Mendeleev to Oganesson: A Multidisciplinary Perspective on the Periodic Table

Since 1969, the international chemistry community has only held conferences on the topic of the Periodic Table three times, and the 2012 conference in Cusco, Peru was the first in almost a decade. The conference was highly interdisciplinary, featuring papers on geology, physics, mathematical and theoretical chemistry, the history and philosophy of chemistry, and chemical education, from the most reputable Periodic Table scholars across the world. Eric Scerri and Guillermo Restrepo have collected fifteen of the strongest papers presented at this conference, from the most notable Periodic Table scholars. The collected volume will contain pieces on chemistry, philosophy of science, applied mathematics, and science education.

Eric Scerri is a leading philosopher of science specializing in the history and philosophy of chemistry and especially the periodic table. He is the author of numerous OUP books including A Tale of Seven Scientists and a New Philosophy of Science (2016) and The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction (2012). Scerri has been a full-time lecturer at UCLA for the past eighteen years where he regularly teaches classes in history and philosophy of science.

Guillermo Restrepo is a chemist specializing in mathematical and philosophy of chemistry with more than sixty scientific papers and book chapters on these and related areas. Restrepo was a professor of chemistry at the Universidad de Pamplona (Colombia) between 2004 and 2017, and since 2014 has been in Germany as an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at Leipzig University and more recently as researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences.

    Preface
1. Heavy, Superheavy...Quo Vadis?
2. Nuclear Lattice Model and the Electronic Configuration of the Chemical Elements
3. Amateurs and Professionals in Chemistry: The Case of the Periodic System
4. The Periodic System: A Mathematical Approach
5. The "Chemical Mechanics" of the Periodic Table
6. The Grand Periodic Function
7. What Elements Belong in Group 3 of the Periodic Table?
8. The Periodic Table Retrieved from Density Functional Theory Based Concepts: The Electron Density, the Shape Function and the Linear Response Function
9. Resemioticization of Periodicity: A Social Semiotic Perspective
10. Organizing the Transition Metals
11. The Earth Scientist's Periodic Table of the Elements and Their Ions: A New Periodic Table Founded on Non-Traditional Concepts
12. The Origin of Mendeleev's Discovery of the Periodic System
13. Richard Abegg and the Periodic Table
14. The Chemist as Philosopher: D. I. Mendeleev's "The Unit" and "Worldview"
15. The Philosophical Importance of the Periodic Table

Publisher     Amazon

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2018

Places of the Periodic Table

An interactive, searchable Google map of places associated with the developers of the periodic table and with the chemical elements with links to further information brought to you by Carmen Giunta and James Marshall, with the encouragement of the ACS Division of the History of Chemistry (HIST), to mark the International Year of the Periodic Table (IYPT). This is an interactive searchable map of places associated with the developers of the periodic table and with the chemical elements with links to further information.

Examples include places where elements were discovered or synthesized, mineral sources of elements, places where discoverers of chemical periodicity worked, and places for which elements were named. Each entry contains links to further information about the person, place, or event described. The type of site is indicated (for example, lab, residence, mineral source, etc.), as well as whether (to the best of our knowledge) the historical site still exists at the location. For more information on the type of site, please consult this key to the map's fields. The map is intended for educational and informational purposes only, and is not meant as a travel guide. If you wish to visit a site on this map, please consult other resources to confirm access, and use common sense. (Read more here.)

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2018

Superconductivity of Hydrides Periodic Table

Scientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Skoltech have demonstrated the high-temperature superconductivity of actinium hydrides and discovered a general principle for calculating the superconductivity of hydrides based on the periodic table alone. The results of their study were published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Setting The Table

The journal Science gives "a visual brief history" of the periodic table, with some neat graphics showing the PT grew and changed with time. (You will need to visit the webpage to see the cool graphics inaction):

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2019

UCLA Periodic Table (Proposed)

Eric Scerri writes:

During an office hour here at UCLA with a couple of students – Annelise Gazale & Chidinma Onyeonwu – we came up with a 'new periodic table'.

The basis of it is related to a point you frequently make against the Left Step formulation, namely that it messes up trends in atomic radius etc.

So how about this: Traditionally on the right side of the table elements become less reactive as we move down, but on the right side of the table elements become more reactive as we move down. Consequently, the noble gases are anomalous in the way they usually sit since they become more reactive as we move down the table.

Ergo: Move the noble gases to the left edge of the table. (Yes, this has been done before of course but not for this reason.)

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Möbius-Escher Periodic Table

A comment article in Nature by Prof. Eric Scerri about quantum mechanics and the periodic table:

"Can quantum ideas explain chemistry's greatest icon? Simplistic assumptions about the periodic table lead us astray.

"Such has been the scientific and cultural impact of Dmitri Mendeleev's periodic table of the elements that many people assume it is essentially complete. [But] in its 150th year, can researchers simply raise a toast to the table's many dividends, and occasionally incorporate another heavy synthetic element?

"No – this invaluable compilation is still not settled. The placements of certain elements, even hydrogen and helium, are debated."

The article is accompanied by a fantastic illustration by Señor Salme with ideas from the Möbius strip and M.C. Escher:

Click image to enlarge:

Another Señor Salme PT image:

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2019

Kultovoy's Periodic Table Book

Nicolay Kultovoy, website, as sent me a copy of his Periodic Table book, entitled [Google Translate]: Book 5. Part 11-08. A single quantum mechanical model of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the periodic table of chemical elements of D.I. Mendeleev.

In a mixture of Russian & English, the PDF of the book can be viewed here.

Chapter 1. Triune (electrons, nucleons, chemical elements) quantum mechanical model of Colt. Three
1.1 the Rules of filling of the orbits of electrons.
1.2 Pyramidal lattice.
1.3 models with cubic sieve.
1.4 models with face-centered lattice.
1.5 quantum Mechanical form of the periodic table of chemical elements.
1.6 Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table.
 
Chapter 2. A lattice model of the nucleus. Model 62
2.1 Berezovsky G. N.
2.2 I. Boldov
2.4 Konovalov.
2.5 Manturov V.
2.6 Semikov S. A.
2.7 alpha-partial model of the atomic nucleus.
2.8 Burtaev V.
 
Chapter 3. Various lattice (crystal) model of the nucleus of an atom. One hundred five
3.0 Luis Pauling.
3.1 Valery Tsimmerman. ADOMAH Periodic Table. Model 3-2.
3.2 Klishev B. V. Model 3-1.
3.3 Garai J. Model 3-1.
3.4 Winger E Model 4-2.
3.5 Norman D. Cook. Model 4-1.
3.6 Gamal A. Nasser. Model 4-1.
3.7 D. Asanbaeva Model 4-1.
3.8 Datsuk V. K.
3.9 Bolotov B.
3.10 Djibladze M. I.
3.11 Dyukin S. V.
3.12 A. N. Mishin.
3.13 M. M. Protodyakonov
3.14 Dry I. N.
3.15 Ulf-G. Meißner.
3.16 Foreign works.
 
Chapter 4. Long-period periodic table. One hundred eighty one
4.1 long-Period representation of the periodic table.
4.2 Artamonov, G. N.
4.3 Galiulin R. V.
4.4 E. K. Spirin
4.5. Khoroshavin L.
4.6 Step form proposed by Thomsen and Bohr.
4.7 Symmetrical shape of the periodic table.
 
Chapter 5. Construction of a periodic table based on the structure of orbitals. Two hundred twenty one
5.1 construction of the periodic table on the basis of orbitals.
5.2 Short V. M.
5.3 Kulakov, the Novosibirsk table of multiplets.
 
Chapter 6. Atomic structure. Two hundred forty eight
6.1 Table of isotopes.
6.2 the structure of the orbitals.

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2019

Schaltenbrand's Helical Gathering of the Elements

From the RSC Website:

"A glistering, shining spiral made of silver, gold, platinum, palladium and a diamond forms the show-stopping apex of the tribute from the University of Cambridge's St Catharine's college to the International Year of the Periodic Table.

"Commissioned to match George Schaltenbrand's 1920 design for a helical gathering of the elements – albeit extended to all 118 current elements – and signed by Yuri Oganessian, it is almost certainly the most expensive periodic table in the world."

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Poliakoff's Inverted Periodic Table

From Nature Chemistry. Martyn Poliakoff et al write:

"The inverted periodic table is obtained by rotating the conventional one by 180° about a horizontal axis.

"a, The lighter elements are now at the bottom and the filling of the electron shells occurs upwards. Just like the traditional representation, many properties (for example, atomic number) increase across the table as one proceeds from left to right, but in the inverted version, the same properties now increase as one moves from the bottom to the top, which is the way that most graphs are plotted. Also like the conventional table, the lanthanides and actinides still sit uncomfortably in an isolated block.

"b, In principle, this could be overcome by inverting the 'long form' of the table but, like the conventional long form, it is probably too elongated to be very useful to most chemists."

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Group 3 of The Periodic Table

There are several ways in which the 'common/modern medium form' periodic table are shown with respect to the Group 3 elements and how the f-block is shown. Indeed, there is even some dispute about which elements constitute Group 3. There are three general approaches to showing Group 3:

(See Scerri's take and Thyssen's view on this matter.)

So, which one of the three options is 'better'?

The general feeling amongst the knowledgeable is that leaving a gap is not an option, so it comes down to:

Sc, Y, La, Ac     vs.     Sc, Y, Lu, Lr

René Vernon has looked as the properties of the potential Group 3 elements, including: densities, 1st ionisation energies, ionic radii, 3rd ionisation energies, melting points & electron affinity:

Figure 1 shows that a Z plot of the density values for Sc, Y, La, Lu Ac and Lr follows a smooth trendline.

Figure 2 shows that a Z plot of the first ionization energy values follows a smooth trendline.

Figure 3 shows that a Z plot of the 6-coordinate ionic radii for the subject elements bifurcates after Y into an -La-Ac tranche (R2 = 0.99) and a -Lu-Lr branch (0.61). The trendline for -La-Ac is smoother.

Figure 4 shows a Z plot of 3rd ionisation energy values bifurcating after Y into a -Lu-Lr tranche (R2 = 0.83) and a -La-Ac branch (0.98). The trendline for -La-Ac is smoother.

Figure 5 shows that a Z plot of the melting points bifurcates after Y into an -Lu-Lr (R2 = 0.72) tranche and a -La-Ac (0.71) branch. While the fit values for the two options are comparable, -Lu-Lr is preferred since Y and La show a greater departure from trend.

Figure 6 has a Z plot of electron affinity values bifurcating after Y into an -La-Ac tranche (R2 = 0.85) and a -Lu-Lr branch (0.99).[iii] The trendline supports Lu-Lr. The trend-lines by themselves are inconclusive: two show no difference; two support -La-Ac; two support -Lu-Lr.

Upon reviewing the data, René's comment is that: "The net result is that the two options seem inseparable" and he proposes that IUPAC adopt the following periodic table numbering system:

Professor Sir Martyn Poliakoff's [of the Periodic Videos YouTube channel & Nottiningham University] take on this matter:

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2019

Meyer's NYT Graphic

A nice graphic by Alex Eben Meyer in the New York Times accompanying an article about the periodic table and some of Sir Martyn Poliakoff ideas.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Where Mendeleev Was Wrong

A paper by Gábor Lente, Where Mendeleev was wrong: predicted elements that have never been found, from ChemTexts https://doi.org/10.1007/s40828-019-0092-5.

As is well known, Mendeleev sucessfully predicted the existance of several elements, but he was not always correct.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue: The Elements

A Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue on The Elements.

Using state of the art [2019] web graphics, and packed with interesting business stories:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Mendeleev 150

Mendeleev 150 is the 4th International Conference on the Periodic Table. The event welcomed nearly 300 guests from over 30 countries and has become one of the key events of IUPAC's International Year of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri

A YouTube video about IUPAC's International Year of the Periodic Table:

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

C&EN No Agreement

From C&EN: The periodic table is an icon. But chemists still can't agree on how to arrange it:

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Weise's Tetrahedral Periodic Table

A Facebook video by Dmitry Weise showing how the conventional periodic table can be morphed into a tetrahedral formulation via the Janet Left Step:

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Nature's IYPT Interactive Periodic Table

Nature's IYPT Interactive Periodic Table.

"To celebrate the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements, our editors have curated research papers, commentaries and multimedia from Nature and the Nature Research journals. Dive in to find out what connects sodium with Sri Lanka, how many times astatine was discovered and where the White House got its name... And much more!"

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Scerri's The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance 2nd Edition

The 2nd Edition of Eric Scerri's well regarded book, The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance has been published by Oxford University Press and is available at all good bookshops, including online.

See Eric's website EricScerri.com and Twitter Feed.



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2019

International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri

Interview with leading expert on the periodic table and UCLA professor, Eric Scerri, to celebrate the International Year of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Students, Periodic Table of

Translated from Catalan: Representation of the periodic table made by the students of Baccalaureate of the INS Santa Coloma de Farners in commemoration of the international year of the Periodic Table (2019). Photo: Emma Masó

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Elemental Podcast

Radio New Zealand Podcast: Elemental, A journey through the periodic table of elements with chemistry professor Allan Blackman, from AUT, and Alison Ballance

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Green & Sustainable Chemistry, Periodic Table of

The periodic table of the elements of green and sustainable chemistry by Paul T. Anastas & Julie B. Zimmerman, Green Chem., 2019,21, 6545-6566, (DOI: 10.1039/c9gc01293a). Also, there is a review article in Chemistry World.

Click image to enlarge:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2020

What Is A Chemical Element?

A Collection of Essays by Chemists, Philosophers, Historians, and Educators Edited by Eric Scerri and Elena Ghibaudi published by Oxford University Press

The concept of a chemical element is foundational within the field of chemistry, but there is wide disagreement over its definition. Even the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) claims two distinct definitions: a species of atoms versus one which identifies chemical elements with the simple substances bearing their names. The double definition of elements proposed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry contrasts an abstract meaning and an operational one. Nevertheless, the philosophical aspects of this notion are not fully captured by the IUPAC definitions, despite the fact that they were crucial for the construction of the Periodic Table. Although rich scientific literature on the element and the periodic table exists as well as a recent growth in the philosophy of chemistry, scholars are still searching for a definitive answer to this important question: What is an element?

Eric Scerri and Elena Ghibaudi have teamed up to assemble a group of scholars to provide readers an overview of the current state of the debate on chemical elements from epistemological, historical, and educational perspectives. What Is A Chemical Element? fills a gap for the benefit of the whole chemistry community-experimental researchers, philosophers, chemistry educators, and anyone looking to learn more about the elements of the periodic table.

Foreword
Introduction
CHAPTER 1: The many questions raised by the dual concept of 'element' Eric R. Scerri
CHAPTER 2: From simple substance to chemical element Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent
CHAPTER 3: Dmitrii Mendeleev's concept of the chemical element prior to the Periodic Law Nathan M. Brooks
CHAPTER 4: Referring to chemical elements and compounds: Colourless airs in late eighteenth century chemical practice Geoffrey Blumenthal, James Ladyman, and Vanessa Seifert
CHAPTER 5: The Changing Relation Between Atomicity and Elementarity: From Lavoisier to Dalton Marina P. Banchetti-Robino
CHAPTER 6: Origins of the Ambiguity of the Current Definition of Chemical Element Joseph E. Earley
CHAPTER 7: The Existence of Elements, and the Elements of Existence Robin F. Hendry
CHAPTER 8: Kant, Cassirer, and the Idea of Chemical Element Farzad Mahootian
CHAPTER 9: The Operational Definition of the Elements: A Philosophical Reappraisal Joachim Schummer
CHAPTER 10: Substance and Function: The case of Chemical Elements Jean-Pierre Llored
CHAPTER 11: Making elements Klaus Ruthenberg
CHAPTER 12: A formal approach to the conceptual development of chemical element Guillermo Restrepo
CHAPTER 13: Chemical Elements and Chemical Substances: Rethinking Paneth's Distinction Sara N. Hjimans
CHAPTER 14: The dual conception of the chemical element: epistemic aspects and implications for chemical education Elena Ghibaudi, Alberto Regis, and Ezio Roletto
Appendix: Reference list on the philosophy of chemistry Index.

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2020

Vernon's Periodic Table showing the Idealized Solid-State Electron Configurations of the Elements

René Vernon writes:

"I've attached a periodic table showing the solid-state electron configurations of the elements. Among other things, it provides a first order explanation as to why elements such as Ln (etc.) like the +3 oxidation state.

"The table includes two versions of the f-block, the first starting with La-Ac; the second with Ce-Th. The table with the first f-block version has 24 anomalies [with respect to Madelung's rule]; the table with the second f-block version has 10 anomalies.

"In the case of the Sc-Y-La-Ac form, I wonder if such a solid-state table is more relevant these days than a table based on gas phase configurations, which has about 20 anomalous configurations.

"Partly we use gas phase configurations since, as Eric Scerri mentioned to me elsewhere, configurations were first obtained (~100 years ago?) from spectroscopy, and this field primarily deals with gas phase atoms. That said, are gas phase configurations still so relevant these days – for this purpose – given the importance of solid-state physics?

"I've never been able to find a periodic table of solid-state electron configurations. Perhaps that has something to do with it? Then again, surely I'm not the first person to have drawn one of these?"

Click image below to enlarge:

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2020

Scerri's Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements

From Eric Scerri, a periodic table of books about the periodic table & the chemical elements... many by Eric Scerri himself.

Eric Scerri, UCLA, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Click to enlarge:

There is no particular connection between each of the elements and the book associated with it in the table, with the exception of: H, He, N, Ti, V, Nb, Ag, La, Au, Ac, U, Pu & Og.

The following is a list of references for each of the 118 books featured on Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements. Books published in languages other than English are shown in color. They include the Catalan, Croatian, French, German, Italian, Norwegian & Spanish languages:

1 H J. Ridgen, Hydrogen, the Essential Element, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2002.
2 He W.M. Sears Jr., Helium, The Disappearing Element, Springer, Berlin, 2015.
3 Li K. Lew, The Alkali Metals, Rosen Central, New York, 2009.
4 Be S. Esteban Santos, La Historia del Sistema Periodico, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, 2009. (Spanish)
5 B E.R. Scerri. The Periodic Table, Its Story and Its Significance, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, New York, 2020.
6 C U. Lagerkvist, The Periodic Table and a Missed Nobel Prize, World Scientific, Singapore, 2012.
7 N W.B. Jensen, Mendeleev on the Periodic Law: Selected Writings, 1869–1905, Dover, Mineola, NY, 2005.
8 O M. Kaji, H. Kragh, G. Pallo, (eds.), Early Responses to the Periodic System, Oxford University, Press, New York, 2015.
9 F E. Mazurs, Graphic Representation of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, Alabama University Press, Tuscaloosa, AL, 1974.
10 Ne T. Gray, The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe, Black Dog & Leventhal, 2009.
11 Na N.C. Norman, Periodicity and the s- and p-Block Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2007.
12 Mg M. Gordin, A Well-Ordered Thing, Dimitrii Mendeleev and the Shadow of the Periodic Table, 2nd edition, Basic Books, New York, 2019.
13 Al S. Kean, The Disappearing Spoon, Little, Brown & Co., New York, 2010.
14 Si P.A. Cox, The Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1989.
15 P J. Emsley, The 13th Element: The Sordid Tale of Murder, Fire, and Phosphorus, Wiley, New York, 2002.
16 S P. Parsons, G. Dixon, The Periodic Table: A Field Guide to the Elements, Qurcus, London, 2014.
17 Cl P. Levi, The Periodic Table, Schocken, New York, 1995.
18 Ar B.D. Wiker, The Mystery of the Periodic Table, Bethlehem Books, New York, 2003.
19 K H. Alderesey-Williams, Periodic Tales, Viking Press, 2011.
20 Ca P. Strathern, Mendeleyev's Dream, Hamish-Hamilton, London, 1999.
21 Sc D. Scott, Around the World in 18 Elements, Royal Society of Chemistry, London, 2015.
22 Ti E. W. Collings, Gerhard Welsch, Materials Properties Handbook: Titanium Alloys, ASM International, Geauga County, Ohio, 1994.
23 V D. Rehder, Bioinorganic Vanadium Chemistry, Wiley-Blackwell, Weinheim, 2008.
24 Cr K. Chapman, Superheavy, Bloomsbury Sigma, New York, 2019.
25 Mn E.R. Scerri, E. Ghibaudi (eds.), What is an Element? Oxford University Press, New York, 2020.
26 Fe M. Soon Lee, Elemental Haiku, Ten Speed Press, New York, 2019.
27 Co J. Emsley, Nature's Building Blocks, An A-Z Guide to the Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2001.
28 Ni T. James, Elemental, Robinson, London, 2018.
29 Cu E.R. Scerri, The Periodic Table, Its Story and Its Significance, Oxford University Press, New York, 2007.
30 Zn H. Rossotti, Diverse Atoms, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1998.
31 Ga P. Ball, A Very Short Introduction to the Elements, Oxford University Press, 2004.
32 Ge I. Asimov, The Building Blocks of the Universe, Lancer Books, New York, 1966.
33 As J. Browne, Seven Elements that Changed the World, Weidenfeld and Nicholson, London, 2013.
34 Se N. Raos, Bezbroj Lica Periodnog Sustava Elemenata, Technical Museum of Zagreb, Croatia, 2010. (Croatian)
35 Br P. Strathern, The Knowledge, The Periodic Table, Quadrille Publishing, London, 2015.
36 Kr A. Ede, The Chemical Element, Greenwood Press, Westport, CT, 2006.
37 Rb A. Stwertka, The Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1998.
38 Sr E.R. Scerri, A Tale of Seven Elements, Oxford University Press, New York, 2013.
39 Y H.-J. Quadbeck-Seeger, World of the Elements, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2007.
40 Zr M. Fontani, M. Costa, M.V. Orna (eds.), The Lost Elements, Oxford University Press, New York, 2015.
41 Nb M. Seegers, T. Peeters (eds.), Niobium: Chemical Properties, Applications and Environmental Effects, Nova Science Publishers, New York, 2013.
42 Mo E.R. Scerri, Selected Papers on the Periodic Table, Imperial College Press, Imperial College Press, London and Singapore, 2009.
43 Tc A. Dingle, The Periodic Table, Elements with Style, Kingfisher, Richmond, B.C. Canada, 2007.
44 Ru G. Rudorf, Das periodische System, seine Geschichte und Bedeutung für die chemische Sysytematik, Hamburg-Leipzig, 1904. (German)
45 Rh I. Nechaev, G.W. Jenkins, The Chemical Elements, Tarquin Publications, Publications, Norfolk, UK, 1997.
46 Pd P. Davern, The Periodic Table of Poems, No Starch Press, San Francisco, 2020.
47 Ag C. Fenau, Non-ferrous metals from Ag to Zn, Unicore, Brussells, 2002.
48 Cd J. Van Spronsen, The Periodic System of the Chemical Elements, A History of the First Hundred Years, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1969.
49 In M. Tweed, Essential Elements, Walker and Company, New York, 2003.
50 Sn M.E. Weeks, Discovery of the Elements, Journal of Chemical Education, Easton PA, 1960.
51 Sb P. Wothers, Antimony Gold Jupiter's Wolf, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2019.
52 Te W. Zhu, Chemical Elements in Life, World Scientific Press, Singapore, 2020.
53 I O. Sacks, Uncle Tungsten, Vintage Books, New York, 2001.
54 Xe E.R. Scerri, (ed.), 30-Second Elements, Icon Books, London, 2013.
55 Cs M. Jacob (ed.), It's Elemental: The Periodic Table, Celebrating 80th Anniversary, Chemical & Engineering News, American Chemical Society, Washington D.C., 2003.
56 Ba J. Marshall, Discovery of the Elements, Pearson Custom Publishing, New York,1998.
57 La K. Veronense, Rare, Prometheus Books, Amherst, New York, 2015.
58 Ce N. Holt, The Periodic Table of Football, Ebury Publishing, London, 2016.
59 Pr S. Alvarez, C. Mans, 150 Ans de Taules Périodiques a la Universitat de Barcelona, Edicions de la Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 2019. (Catalan)
60 Nd L. Garzon Ruiperez, De Mendeleiev a Los Superelementos, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, 1988. (Spanish)
61 Pm P. Ball, A Guided Tour of the Ingredients, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002.
62 Sm S. Esteban Santos, La Historia del Sistema Periodico, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, 2009. (Spanish).
63 Eu A. E. Garrett, The Periodic Law, D. Appleton & Co., New York, 1909.
64 Gd M.S. Sethi, M. Satake, Periodic Tables and Periodic Properties, Discovery Publishing House, Delhi, India, 1992.
65 Tb M. Eesa, The cosmic history of the elements: A brief journey through the creation of the chemical elements and the history of the periodic table, Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012.
66 Dy P. Depovere, La Classification périodique des éléments, De Boeck, Bruxelles, 2002. (French).
67 Ho F. Habashi, The Periodic Table & Mendeleev, Laval University Press, Quebec, 2017.
68 Er W.J. Nuttall, R. Clarke, B. Glowacki, The Future of Helium as a Natural Resource, Routledge, London, 2014.
69 Tm R.D. Osorio Giraldo, M.V. Alzate Cano, La Tabla Periodica, Bogota, Colombia, 2010. (Spanish).
70 Yb P.R. Polo, El Profeta del Orden Quimico, Mendeleiev, Nivola, Spain, 2008. (Spanish).
71 Lu E.R. Scerri, A Very Short Introduction to the Periodic Table, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2019.
72 Hf D.H. Rouvray, R.B. King, The Mathematics of the Periodic Table, Nova Scientific Publishers, New York, 2006.
73 Ta P. Thyssen, A. Ceulemans, Shattered Symmetry, Oxford University Press, New York, 2017.
74 W P.W. Atkins, The Periodic Kingdom, Basic Books, New York, NY, 1995.
75 Re D.G. Cooper, The Periodic Table, 3rd edition. Butterworths, London, 1964.
76 Os E. Lassner, W.-D. Schubert, Tungsten: Properties, Chemistry, Technology of the Element, Alloys, and Chemical Compounds, Springer, Berlin, 1999.
77 Ir J.C.A. Boeyens, D.C. Levendis, Number Theory and the Periodicity of Matter, Springer, Berlin, 2008.
78 Pt R. Hefferlin, Periodic Systems and their Relation to the Systematic Analysis of Molecular Data, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, NY, 1989.
79 Au R.J. Puddephatt, The Chemistry of Gold, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1978.
80 Hg D.H. Rouvray, R.B. King, The Periodic Table Into the 21st Century, Research Studies Press, Baldock, UK, 2004.
81 Tl R.E. Krebs, The History and Use of Our Earth's Chemical Elements, Greenwood Publishing Group, Santa Barbara, CA, 2006.
82 Pb E. Torgsen, Genier, sjarlataner og 50 bøtter med urin - Historien om det periodiske system, Spartacus, 2018. (Norwegian).
83 Bi K. Buchanan, D. Roller, Memorize the Periodic Table, Memory Worldwide Pty Limited, 2013.
84 Po D. Morris, The Last Sorcerers, The Path from Alchemy to the Periodic Table, Joseph Henry Press, New York, 2003.
85 At T. Jackson, The Elements, Shelter Harbor Press, New York, 2012.
86 Rn R.J.P. Williams, J.J.R. Frausto da Silva, The Natural Selection of the Chemical Elements: The Environment and Life's Chemistry, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1997.
87 Fr G. Rudorf, The Periodic Classification and the Problem of Chemical Evolution, Whittaker & Co., London, New York, 1900.
88 Ra L. Van Gorp, Elements, Compass Point Books, Manakato, MN, 2008.
89 Ac G.T. Seaborg, J.J. Katz, L.R. Morss, Chemistry of the Actinide Elements, Springer, Berlin, 1986.
90 Th G. Münzenberg, Superheavy Elements - Searching for the End of the Periodic Table, Manipal Universal Press, India, 2018.
91 Pa A. Castillejos Salazar, La Tabla Periòdica: Abecedario de la Quimica, Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, D.F. Mexico, 2005. (Spanish).
92 U T. Zoellner, Uranium, Penguin Books, London, 2009.
93 Np J. Barrett, Atomic Structure and Periodicity, Royal Society of Chemistry, London, 2002.
94 Pu J. Bernstein, Plutonium, Joseph Henry, Washington DC, 2007.
95 Am S. Hofmann, Beyond Uranium, Taylor & Francis, London, 2002.
96 Cm H.M. Davis, The Chemical Elements, Ballantine Books, New York, 1961.
97 Bk P.González Duarte, Les Mils Cares de la Taula Periòdica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra Barcelona, 2005 (Catalan).
98 Cf R. Rich, Periodic Correlations, Benjamin, New York, 1965.
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100 Fm P.K. Kuroda, The Origin of the Chemical Elements, and the Oklo Phenomenon, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1982.
101 Md G. Villani, Mendeleev,  La Tavola Periodica Degli Elementi, Grandangolo, Milan, 2016. (Italian).
102 No J. Russell, Elementary: The Periodic Table Explained, Michael O'Mara, London, 2020.
103 Lr P. Enghag, Encyclopedia of the Elements, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2004.
104 Rf R.J. Puddephatt, The Periodic Table of the Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1972.
105 Db L. Ohrström, The Last Alchemist in Paris, Oxford University Press, New York, 2013.
106 Sg N.N. Greenwood, E. Earnshaw, Chemistry of the Elements, 2nd edition, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1997.
107 Bh R. Luft, Dictionnaire des Corps Simples de la Chimie, Association Cultures et Techniques, Nantes, 1997. (French)
108 Hs Science Foundation Course Team, The Periodic Table and Chemical Bonding, The Open University, Milton Keynes, 1971.
109 Mt W.W. Schulz, J. Navratil, Transplutonium Elements, American Chemical Society, Washington D.C., 1981.
110 Ds I. Nechaev, Chemical Elements, Lindsay Drummond, 1946.
111 Rg F. Hund, Linienspektren und Periodisches System Der Elemente, Springer, Berlin, 1927.
112 Cn F.P. Venable, The Development of the Periodic Law, Chemical Publishing Co., Easton, PA, 1896.
113 Nh O. Baca Mendoza, Leyes Geneticas de los Elementos Quimicos. Nuevo Sistema Periodico, Universidad Nacional de Cuzco, Cuzco, Peru, 1953 (Spanish).
114 Fl B. Yorifuji, Wonderful Life with the Elements, No Starch Press, San Francisco, 2012.
115 Mc D.I. Mendeléeff, The Principles of Chemistry, American Home Library, New York, 1902.
116 Lv A. Lima-de-Faria, Periodic Tables Unifying Living Organisms at the Molecular Level: The Predictive Power of the Law of Periodicity, World Scientific Press, Singapore, 2018.
117 Ts H.B. Gray, J.D. Simon, W.C. Trogler, Braving the Elements, University Science Books, Sausalito, CA, 1995.
118 Og E.R. Scerri, G. Restrepo, Mendeleev to Oganesson, Oxford University Press, New York, 2018.
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2020

Scerri's Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements by ERS

From Eric Scerri, a periodic table of books about the periodic table & the chemical elements... by Eric Scerri, including translations.

Eric Scerri, UCLA, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Click to enlarge:

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2020

Workshop on Teaching 3d-4s Orbitals Presented by Dr. Eric Scerri

Dr. Eric Scerri, UCLA Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, discusses many of the issues concerning the periodic table: the aufbau principle, Madelung's rule, the electronic and anomalous electronic structures of the transition elements, the Sc2+ ion, the Janet Left Step, Group 3: Sc, Y, Lu, Lr vs. Sc, Y, La, Ac, atomic spectroscopy, etc.

Many of the topics that concern those of us interested in the periodic table are discussed.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2020

Interview with Chemist, Dr. Eric Scerri

From Academic Influence. We met with Dr. Eric Scerri to discuss the nature of science, the philosophy of chemistry, and much more. Enjoy!

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2021

150 Years of the Periodic Table

Based on the ACS 2019 symposium "150 Years of the Periodic Table". Provides an overview of how the periodic table has evolved over the past 150 years Written by leading experts in the field: Editors: Giunta, Carmen, Mainz, Vera V., Girolami, Gregory S. (Eds.)

This book provides an overview of the origins and evolution of the periodic system from its prehistory to the latest synthetic elements and possible future additions. The periodic system of the elements first emerged as a comprehensive classificatory and predictive tool for chemistry during the 1860s. Its subsequent embodiment in various versions has made it one of the most recognizable icons of science.

Based primarily on a symposium titled "150 Years of the Periodic Table" and held at the August 2019 national meeting of the American Chemical Society, this book describes the origins of the periodic law, developments that led to its acceptance, chemical families that the system struggled to accommodate, extension of the periodic system to include synthetic elements, and various cultural aspects of the system that were celebrated during the International Year of the Periodic Table.

Contributors include: Ann Robinson, Gary Patterson, Gisela Boek, Mary Virginia Orna, Simon Cotton, Jay Labinger, Kit Chapman, Virginia Trimble, Eric Scerri, William Jensen, Pekka Pyykko, Daniel Rabinovich, Carmen Giunta, Gregory Girolami, Vera Mainz

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2021

Provisional Report on Discussions on Group 3 of The Periodic Table

Provisional Report on Discussions on Group 3 of The Periodic Table by Eric Scerri, De Gruyter | 2021

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/ci-2021-0115

The following article is intended as a brief progress report from the group that has been tasked with mak-ing recommendations to IUPAC about the constitu-tion of group 3 of the periodic table (https://iupac.org/project/2015-039-2-200). It is also intended as a call for feedback or suggestions from members of IUPAC and other readers.



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2021

Eric Scerri's Articles, as Listed on Muck Rack

UCLA chemist - public speaker, author on periodic table, history & philosophy of science, chemical educator, blues guitarist.

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2021

Coronavirus, Periodic Table of: Elements of a Year We'll Never Forget

By Jamie Diersing and posted on McSweeneys, The Periodic Table of Coronavirus: Elements of a Year We'll Never Forget

Click to enlarge:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!

See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2021

World's Largest Periodic Table Created on ECU's Science Building

From architectureanddesign.com.au:

"The new science building at Edith Cowen University (ECU), Joondalup Campus in Perth stands out for its striking façade, which features the world's largest periodic table. The thoughtful design by Silver Thomas Hanley Architects responded to the brief to deliver a bold and sophisticated architectural statement in the urban setting. The façade featuring the periodic table celebrates the building's purpose as a centre of scientific research and learning. Based on the university vice chancellor Professor Steve Chapman's idea, the periodic table is an enormous 662 square metres, spanning the entire front façade of the building."

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!

See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2021

Largest Periodic Table in Eurasia Created in Dubna

From The Times of India:

"The largest [PT] in Eurasia, the Periodic Table of Mendeleev opened in Dubna near Moscow. The event is timed to coincide with the 65th anniversary of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research located here and the city itself. It is noteworthy that it is at JINR, in the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions. G N Flyorov under the guidance of Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences Yuri Oganesyan, all known to date superheavy elements were obtained – from 113th to 118th (the latter is even named after the scientist – 'Oganeson Og'). Oganesyan is the second scientist in the world, after whom a new element of the Periodic Table was named during his lifetime (the first was the American scientist Glenn Theodore Seaborg)."

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!

See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2021

History [of the] Elements and Periodic Table

From the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) an interactive Elements and Perioid Table History web page:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!

See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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