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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

Text search:       


Books & Reviews about the Periodic Table of the Elements, by date:

1885   von Richter's Periodic System of the Elements
1896   Venable's The Development of The Periodic Law
1909   Garrett's The Periodic Law
1934   Quam & Quam's Graphical Representations of The Elements
1957   Mazurs' Graphical Representations of The Periodic System During 100 Years
1959   Mendoza's Neuvo Sistema Periodico
1963   Galaxy of Elements [Discovered] by Swedish Scientists
1969   van Spronsen's The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years
1969   Mendeleevian Conference, Periodicity and Symmetries in the Elementary Structure of Matter
1975   Primo Levi's Elements
1979   Seaborg's "How the Periodic Table Evolved Over 40 Years" (1939 – 1979)
1992   Chemical Slide Rules
1996   Elements & Atoms: Case Studies in the Development of Chemistry
1996   Concept of Chemical Periodicity
1996   Seaborg's Evolution of the Modern Periodic Table
1999   Trapp's Development of the Periodic Chart
2000   Jensen Article: The Periodic Law and Table
2001   Wikipedia Periodic Table
2004   Rouvray & King's The Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century
2004   van der Krogt's Elementymology & Elements Multidict
2004   Sistema Periódico Armonico de Gutierrez-Samanez
2006   Bent's Exploration into Janet's Left-Step Formulation
2006   Scerri's The Periodic Table & Its Significance
2008   Radio Show "The Music of Matter"
2008   Allperiodictables.com
2008   Chemistry In Its Element
2008   Elements Unearthed
2008   Braille Guidebook Interactive Periodic Table Study Set
2008   Mathematical Formulas Describing the Sequences of the Periodic Table
2009   Scerri's Selected Papers on The Periodic Table
2009   Gray's The Elements
2009   Graphic Representations of the Periodic System
2010   Before & After Mendeleev: Periodic Table Videos
2010   Disappearing Spoon
2010   Rare Earths in the Periodic Table
2011   Curious Lives of the Elements: Periodic Tales
2011   Dufour's Periodic Tree: Two Short Films
2011   Scerri's Very Short Introduction To The Periodic Table
2012   Eric Scerri.com
2012   A Tale of 7 Elements
2012   Books on the Chemical Elements and the Periodic Table/System
2012   Scerri's Lecture on The Periodic Table
2012   Wonderful Life with the Elements
2012   Scientific American: The Quest for the Periodic Table
2012   Eric Scerri Lecture, Dedicated to Fernando Dufour
2013   Electronegativity Chart (Leach)
2013   30 Second Elements
2013   From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement
2013   Twitter @periodic_table
2013   Top 10 Periodic Tables
2014   Rogue Elements: What's Wrong with the Periodic Table
2015   Elements: A Series of Business Radio Programs/Podcasts
2015   Sacks' Table of Elements
2015   Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements
2016   Mystery of Matter: Three Videos
2017   Habashi Book: The Periodic Table & Mendeleev
2017   Gray's Wooden Periodic Table Table Video
2017   Restrepo's Similarity Landscape
2018   Timelines, of The Periodic Table
2018   Race to Invent the Periodic Table
2018   Alphabet of Chemistry
2018   Mendeleev to Oganesson: A Multidisciplinary Perspective on the Periodic Table
2019   Physical Origin of Chemical Periodicities in the System of Elements
2019   Möbius-Escher Periodic Table
2019   International Year of the Periodic Table (in Paris and Moscow)
2019   Kultovoy's Periodic Table Book
2019   St Catharine's College: Celebrating the Periodic Table
2019   Evolution and Understanding of the d-Block Elements in the Periodic Table
2019   Nucleosynthesis of the Heavy Elements
2019   5 Periodic Tables We Don't Use (And One We Do)
2019   Papers of Mendeleev, Odlings, Newlands & Chancourtois from the 1860s
2019   Meyer's NYT Graphic
2019   Where Mendeleev Was Wrong
2019   Bloomberg Businessweek: Why the Periodic Table of Elements Is More Important Than Ever
2019   Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue: The Elements
2019   Mendeleev 150
2019   C&EN No Agreement
2019   Scerri's The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance 2nd Edition
2019   International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri
2019   Elemental Podcast
2019   Schmiermund's The Discovery of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements
2020   What Is A Chemical Element?
2020   Scerri's Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements
2020   Rayner-Canham's The Periodic Table: Past, Present, and Future
2020   Scerri's Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements by ERS
2020   Workshop on Teaching 3d-4s Orbitals Presented by Dr. Eric Scerri


1885

von Richter's Periodic System of the Elements

From page 244 of A Text-book of Inorganic Chemistry by Victor von Richter, Published by Blakiston (US ed. in English, 1885). The full text (scanned) is available from archive.org. The first edition was published in 1874 in German. von Richter was was from the Baltic region, in the the Russian empire at the time.

von Richter's work is almost certainly the first chemistry textbook based on the periodic system. Many (indeed most) modern Inorganic Chemistry texts follow this format, but NOT the Chemogenesis web book!

von Richter, writes:





Thanks to René for the tip!

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1896

Venable's The Development of The Periodic Law

The Development of the Periodic Law by Venable, Francis Preston (1856-1934), Easton, Pa. Chemical Pub. Co (1896).

The full text (scanned) is available from archive.org.


Thanks to René for the tip!

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1909

Garrett's The Periodic Law

A book reviewing The Periodic Law by A.E. Garrett, pub. D. Appelton & Co (1909). This work shows the state of knowledge in the first decade of the 20th century.

René Vernon writes:

"On page 43 Garrett notes that, '[Thomas] Carnelley was the first English chemist to work out in detail the manner in which the properties of the elements are periodic functions of their atomic weights. His papers on this subject appeared in the Philosophical Magazine between the years 1879 and 1885.' "

Read more one Carnelley here.

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1934

Quam & Quam's Graphical Representations of The Elements

Short Periodic Tables.pdf
Medium Periodic Tables.pdf
Spiral, Helical & Misc Periodic Tables.pdf

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1957

Mazurs' Graphical Representations of The Periodic System During 100 Years

Edward Mazurs, Graphical Representations of The Periodic System During 100 Years, University of Alabama Press, 1957.

There is an internet archive: Edward G. Mazurs Collection of Periodic Systems Images.

This book gives a very full analysis and classification of periodic table formulations. Most of the formulations are redrawn.

However, anybody who is seriously interested in periodic table formulations will want to see/read/own this book. Read more about Mazrus on the Elements Unearthed blog.

 

 

1955

Mazurs' Valence Periodic Table (1974, p.94)

1955

Mazurs' Periodic Table (1974, p. 95)

1955

Mazurs' 1955 Formulation (1974, p. 44)

1958

Mazurs' 1958-73 Formulation (1974, endpaper)

1965

Mazurs' 1965 Formulation (1974, p/ 134)

1967

Mazurs' 1967 Formulation (1974. Inside front cover)

1967

Mazurs' other 1967 Formulation (1974, p. 126)

1967

Mazurs' another 1967 Formulation (1974, p. 134)

1969

Mazurs' Periodic System of Chemical Elements (1974, end foldout)

1974

Mazurs' Version of Janet's "Lemniscate" Formulation (1974, p.80)

1974

Marzus' Wooden Version of Mendeleev's Periodic Table (Chem. Heritage Foundn.)

1974

Mazurs' PT Formulation Analysis (1974, pp.15-16)

 

Many thanks to Philip Stewart for preparing the links table above.

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1959

Mendoza's Neuvo Sistema Periodico

A memorial work, Ley De Configuraciones Electronicas, published posthumously in 1965 to honor Oswaldo Baca Mendoza (1908–1962 Cusco, Peru) and his 1959 Neuvo Sistema Periodico. Download the full PDF file (in Spanish).


Click to enlarge:

Thanks to Julio Gutierrez Samanez for the infomaton, etc.

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1963

Galaxy of Elements [Discovered] by Swedish Scientists

Uploaded by request of Fathi Habashi, an historical video on elements discovered by Swedish scientists.

The film is in the Swedish film database, where it is named: Atomernas vintergata and is dated 1963:

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1969 van Spronsen's The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years

J. W. van Spronsen, The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years, Elsevier 1969

This book gives a good review and discussion of periodic table formulations. Anybody who is seriously interested in periodic table formulations will want to see/read/own this book.

very short introduction

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1969

Mendeleevian Conference, Periodicity and Symmetries in the Elementary Structure of Matter

Atti del Convegno mendeleeviano : periodicità e simmetrie nella struttura elementare della materia : Torino-Roma, 15-21 settembre 1969 / [editor M. Verde] Torino : Accademia delle Scienze di Torino ; Roma : Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, 1971 VIII, 460 p.

Google Translate: Proceedings of the Mendeleevian Conference: periodicity and symmetries in the elementary structure of matter: Turin-Rome, 15-21 September 1969 / [editor M. Verde] Turin: Turin Academy of Sciences; Rome: National Academy of the Lincei, 1971 VIII, 460 p.

From the Internet Archive, the scanned book. Papers are in Italian & English.

For the 100th Anniversary of Mendeleev's iconic periodic table, a conference was held to look at (review) the elementary structure of matter. The 1960s saw huge developments in particle physics, including the theory of quarks. Papers were presented by many notable scientists including John Archibald Wheeler and the Nobel laureates: Emilio Segrè & Murray Gell-Mann.




Thanks to René for the tip!

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1975

Primo Levi's Elements

Primo Levi's elements, from his book The Periodic Table:



Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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1979

Seaborg's "How the Periodic Table Evolved Over 40 Years" (1939 – 1979)

From the C&EN paper THE PERIODIC TABLE: Tortuous path to man-made elements 57, 1979, pp 46-52.

Until World War II, the three heaviest known elements – thorium, protactinium & uranium – were believed to be related to hafnium, tantalum & tungsten respectively. Similarly, elements 93 to 100 were expected to fit neatly into the periodic table:

Synthesis and study of the transuranic elements – neptunium & plutonium – indicated that these new elements were "cousins" of uranium and in 1944 should be placed into a new "uranide" group.

Subsequently (1944/45), Seaborg advanced the theory that elements heavier than actinium actually constitute a distinct "actinide" group that mirrors the lanthanide rare-earth group:

Finally, Seaborg postulated what a future periodic table, up to Z = 168, may look like:

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1992

Chemical Slide Rules

The first chemical slide rules are of interest here because they are, in effect, early periodic tables. But the are more than this, as they can be used for performing chemical calculations. Writing in Bull. Hist. Chem. 12 (1992) (and here), William D. Williams of Harding University writes:

"An article by George Bodner in the Winter 1990 issue of the Bulletin described a rare chemical slide rule designed by Lewis C. Beck and Joseph Henry - their little-known Improved Scale of Chemical Equivalents. [My] paper attempts to place this slide rule in context by describing its origins, as well as some of its predecessors and successors."

Some chemical slide rules mentioned in the text:

Nagayasu Nawa writes and provides an explanation as how Wollaston's chemical equivalents slide rules should be used:

"It is very interesting slide rule for me. Because we actually used slide rule in 1960s. There were not the electronic calculator in the world. I think it would be used as a simple slide rule of The Law of Definite Proportions by J.L. Proust 1799."

Click image to enlarge:

Thanks to Nawa for the tip!

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1996

Elements & Atoms: Case Studies in the Development of Chemistry

Carmen Giunta of Le Moyne College Department of Chemistry has collected many of the original papers plus commentary dealing with eighteenth and nineteenth century science in a web book called Elements and Atoms: Case Studies in the Development of Chemistry. This web resource is highly recommended:

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1996

Concept of Chemical Periodicity

Concept of Chemical Periodicity: from Mendeleev Table to Molecular Hyper-Periodicity Patterns E. V. Babaev and Ray Hefferlin

The paper "The Concepts of Periodicity and Hyper-Periodicity: from Atoms to Molecules" was published as a the book: Concepts in Chemistry: a Contemporary Challenge. (Ed. D.Rouvray). Research Studies Press, London, 1996, pp. 24-81.

The website, here, is the original text of this paper (copyright by the authors).

The text deals with periodicity in isotopes, atoms and materials.

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1996

Seaborg's Evolution of the Modern Periodic Table

By Glenn T. Seaborg, from J. Chem. SOC., Dalton Trans., 1996, Pages 3899-3907:

"In this review, the evolution of the Modern Periodic Table is traced beginning with the original version of Dimitri Mendeleev in 1869.Emphasis is placed on the upper end with a description of the revision to accommodate the actinide series of elements at the time of World War II and the more recent research on the observed and predicted chemical properties of the transactinide elements (beyond atomic number 103).A Modern Periodic Table includes undiscovered elements up to atomic number 118 and a Futuristic Periodic Table with additional undiscovered elements up to atomic number 168 is included."

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1999

Dave Trapp' Development of the Periodic Chart

Dave Trapp has an excellent discussion of the development of the periodic table on his Development of the Periodic Chart pages, part of his Sequim Science web site.

Dave Trapp also has a web site dealing with the origin of the names of the elements:

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2000

Jensen Article: The Periodic Law and Table

From William (Bill) Jensen's website, an article: The Periodic Law and Table (written for Britannica on Line, Encyclopaedia Britannica: Chicago, lL, 2000, but never published. ).

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2001

Wikipedia Periodic Table

The Wikipedia Periodic Table pages are astonishing, giving hyper-linked data about:

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2004

Rouvray & King's The Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century

D. H Rouvray and R. B. King (ed.), The Periodic Table: Into the 21st Century, Research Studies Press 2004.

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2004

Peter van der Krogt's Elementymology & Elements Multidict

Peter van der Krogt's Elementymology & Elements Multidict, the web site for element names, origins (etymology) of element names and translations into other languages.

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2004

Sistema Periódico Armonico de Gutierrez-Samanez

A digitised 2004 book by book by Julio Gutiérrez-Samanez.

Julio writes:

"These matrix tables are inspired by the method used by the Peruvian chemist Oswaldo Baca Mendoza (1908-1962).

"The tables are read in this way: The Law of Formation of nuclei generates all the horizontal series Z, is dependent on n (series of integers numbers) and a constant K = 1. In the step-to-right tables (n) it will be equal to or greater than 0. In Janet's Left-Step table, (n) will be less than or equal to (-1). The values of this series Z will serve as a constant for the second law.

"The Group Formation Law or vertical series. Its generate the numeric values of the columns either from left to right or from right to left. In system A -1: With the first law: n = 0, then Z = 1. The vertical series Zg = 1, 3 11, 19, 37, 55, 87 ... That is: 1H, 3Li, 11Na, 19K, 37Rb, 55Cs, 87Fr, 119, 169 ... Changing the values of n or Z, all the columns of the table will be obtained.

"In system A -2: With the first law: on the left, n = -1, then Z = 0. The vertical series Zg will be: 2He, 10Ne, 18Ar, 36Kr, 54Xe, 86Rn, 118Og, 168, 218. .. Similarly, changing the n or Z values, we can fills the columns of the table. In system B -1: With the first law: for n = 0, then Z = 1. The vertical series Zg will be; 1H, 3Li, 5B, 13Al, 21Sc, 39Y, 57La, 89Ac, 121, 171 ... By varying the values of n or Z, the entire table is filled. In system B -2: (Its mathematizes the Janet system). With the first law: on the left, for n = -1, then Z = 0.

"The vertical series Zg will be; 2He, 4Be, 12Mg, 20Ca, 38Sr, 56Ba, 88Ra, 120, 170, 220 ... By varying the values of n or Z, the entire table is filled. The third law of the limiting the periods or periodic law, appears graphically, by comparison between rows: For example: in table B -1, in column Z = 3, after 1H and 2He, en of the first horizontal line, the value 3 appears, which is already entered in the first column as 3Li, therefore, that part of the first horizontal row (from 3 to 50) is deleted.

"The same happens with the number 5 in column 3, which is already in the first column as 5B, therefore it will be deleted in the second row from 5 to 52. The same applies to pair 13, 21 of the column Z = 9, same, with the pair 39, 57 of the column Z = 19 and of the pair 89, 121 of the column Z = 33. For that reason the periods: P are duplicated function: 2 (1 ^ 2), 2 (1 ^ 2), 2 (2 ^ 2), 2 (2 ^ 2), 2 (3 ^ 2), 2 (3 ^ 2) .... = 2, 2, 8, 8, 18, 18, 32, 32 ... and the forms are exact and staggered. The colors represent the quantum functions: s (red), p (orange), d (yellow), f (green), g (blue)."

Read the book here (in Spanish).

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2006

Henry Bent's Exploration into Janet's Left-Step Formulation

Henry Ben't detailed exploration into the Left-Step formulation of the periodic table is available as a book:

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2006

Eric Scerri's The Periodic Table & Its Significance

Eric Scerri, The Periodic Table: Its Story and Its Significance, Oxford University Press, 2006. Read an interview with the author, here, and a review of the book here.

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2008

Periodic Table Radio Show "The Music of Matter"

Periodic Table Radio Show "The Music of Matter" featuring John Emsley, Oliver Sacks & Eric Scerri

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2008

Allperiodictables.com

Roy Alexander, inventor of the "Desk-Topper" 3-dimensional formulation has developed a rich periodic table resource.. available at Allperiodictables.com.

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2008

Chemistry In Its Element

Introducing Chemistry in its element, a tour of the periodic table.

A leading scientist or author tells the stories behind the elements in a five minute podcast.

Podcasts to Download:

etc...

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2008

Elements Unearthed

The Elements Unearthed is a blog by David V Black concerning "Our Discovery and Usage of the Chemical Elements".

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2008

Braille Guidebook Interactive Periodic Table Study Set

Azer's Interactive Periodic Table Study Set is designed to make learning about the Periodic Table of the Elements accessible to students with visual impairments or blindness.

The tangible materials included with this study set complement APH's Periodic Table of the Elements Reference Chart and allow students to enhance their understanding of concepts consistent with the National Science Standards.

Inspired by Samir Azer, a science teacher at the Kentucky School for the Blind, this set can assist in the instruction and demonstration of concepts related to the arrangement of the periodic table, atomic structure, ionic and covalent bonding, and balancing of chemical equations to students who benefit from a hands-on, interactive model.

Special attention was given to make the materials tactually discriminable and visually appealing to the target population, yet appropriate for all students regardless of visual acuity:

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2008

Mathematical Formulas Describing the Sequences of the Periodic Table

Mathematical formulas describing all of the sequences of the chemical elements are derived from double tetrahedron face-centered cubic lattice model. More here.

J. Garai, Department of Earth Sciences, Florida International University. International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, Vol 108, 667-670 (2008):

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2009

Scerri's Selected Papers on The Periodic Table

Edited by Eric Scerri (University of California, Los Angeles, USA)

Published by: Imperial College Press in London

The book contains key articles by Eric Scerri, the leading authority on the history and philosophy of the periodic table of the elements. These articles explore a range of topics such as the historical evolution of the periodic system as well as its philosophical status and its relationship to modern quantum physics. In this present volume, many of the more in-depth research papers, which formed the basis for this publication, are presented in their entirety; they have also been published in highly accessible science magazines (such as American Scientist), and journals in history and philosophy of science, as well as quantum chemistry. This must-have publication is completely unique as there is nothing of this form currently available on the market.

Contents:


Readership: Academic readers: philosophers and science historians, science educators, chemists and physicists.
200pp (approx.) Pub. date: Scheduled Fall 2009

200pp (approx.) Pub. date: Scheduled Fall 2009
ISBN 978-1-84816-425-3
1-84816-425-4 US$88 / £66

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2009

Gray's The Elements

As Theo (modestly... ) says:

"Much anticipated (by me at least), this is the definitive be-all, end-all book of the elements. Like my poster, it contains beautiful photographs of all the chemical elements, shining out from a deep black background. But unlike my poster, it's not limited to just one picture per element. Instead each element gets a whole 2-page spread. At 10" x 20" (25cm x 50cm), each spread is as large as the whole place mat version of my poster! And several of the more popular elements even get two spreads. There are literally hundreds and hundreds of photos in this book, nearly all of them taken by myself and my co-author Nick Mann of objects in my collection."

Read more here.

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2009

Graphic Representations of the Periodic System

Mary E. Saecker writes an article in Chemical Education Digital Library, Periodic Table Presentations and Inspirations: Graphic Representations of the Periodic System, that reviews some periodic table formunations.

The paper contains a link to this pdf file which gives templates and instructions for several print, cut-out & build periodic table formulations:

Supplement to: Periodic Table Presentations and Inspirations by Mary E. Saecker, J. Chem. Educ., 2009, 86, 1151.

Construction Directions A Cut-Out Chart of the Periodic System (Periodic Table Cylinder)

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2010

Before & After Mendeleev: Periodic Table Videos

Two videos by the Chemical Heritage Foundation:

The videos feature interviews with Dr. Eric Scerri of UCLA, with added narration, animations, illustrations, photos, captions, etc. by David V. Black as well as publication artwork and notes by Edward G. Mazurs.



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2010

Disappearing Spoon

The Disappearing Spoon is a 2010 book by Sam Kean:

"The Periodic Table is one of our crowning scientific achievements, but it's also a treasure trove of passion, adventure, betrayal, and obsession. The fascinating tales in The Disappearing Spoon follow carbon, neon, silicon, gold, and every single element on the table as they play out their parts in human history, finance, mythology, conflict, the arts, medicine, and the lives of the (frequently) mad scientists who discovered them: Why did a little lithium help cure poet Robert Lowell of his madness? And how did Gallium (Ga, 31) become the go-to element for laboratory pranksters?"

"The Disappearing Spoon has the answers, fusing science with the classic lore of invention, investigation, discovery, and alchemy, from the Big Bang through the end of time."



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2010

Rare Earths in the Periodic Table

CRC Handbook on the Physics and Chemistry of Rare Earths, Chapter 248. Accommodation of the Rare Earths in the Periodic Table: A Historical Analysis by Pieter Thyssen and Koen Binnemans (ISBN: 978-0-444-53590-0):

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2011

Curious Lives of the Elements: Periodic Tales

Periodic Tales: The Curious Lives of the Elements by Hugh Aldersey-Williams and published by Viking, ISBN: 9780670918119.

Everything is made of them, from the furthest reaches of the universe to this book that you hold in your hands, including you.

Like you, the elements have lives: personalities and attitudes, talents and shortcomings, stories rich with meaning. You may think of them as the inscrutable letters of the periodic table but you know them much better than you realise.

Welcome to a dazzling tour through history and literature, science and art. Here you'll meet iron that rains from the heavens and noble gases that light the way to vice. You'll learn how lead can tell your future while zinc may one day line your coffin. You'll discover what connects the bones in your body with the Whitehouse in Washington, the glow of a streetlamp with the salt on your dinner table.

From ancient civilisations to contemporary culture, from the oxygen of publicity to the phosphorus in your pee, the elements are near and far and all around us. Unlocking their astonishing secrets and colourful pasts, Periodic Tales will take you on a voyage of wonder and discovery, excitement and novelty, beauty and truth. Along the way, you'll find that their stories are our stories, and their lives are inextricable from our own.

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2011

Dufour's Periodic Tree: Two Short Films

Elsewhere in this database we can see the 1990 Dufour's Periodic Tree, now two short films have been made about this 3D formulation, here & here:

Eric Scerri Letter from Ben Ged Low on Vimeo.

 

Five Foot 3D Model from Ben Ged Low on Vimeo.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2011

Scerri's Very Short Introduction To The Periodic Table

A book by Eric Scerri, The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction.

very short introduction

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2012

Eric Scerri.com

ericscerri.com is the personal internet domain and website of Eric Scerri: chemist and leading philosopher of science specializing in the history and philosophy of the periodic table. He is founder and editor-in-chief of the international journal Foundations of Chemistry, which publishes academic papers concerned with the PT, and is the author of the respected book: The Periodic Table and Its Significance (Oxford University Press, 2007).

The website has links to all of Eric's extensive publications, including online video lectures and interviews and external links.

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2012

A Tale of 7 Elements

A new book by Eric Scerri: A Tale of 7 Elements about seven 'missing' elements: protactinium, hafnium, rhenium, technetium, francium, astatine, promethium:

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2012

Books on the Chemical Elements and the Periodic Table/System

From Eric Scerri's forthcoming book A Tale of Seven Elements (Oxford University Press, 2013) and used by permission of the author, is the most complete and up-to-date list of Books on the Chemical Elements and the Periodic Table/System, including some titles in foreign languages.

Additional books in other languages can be found listed in Mazurs, 1974

Works by D. I. Mendeleev

 

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2012

Eric Scerri's Lecture on The Periodic Table

A lecture by Eric Scerri at the Oscar Peterson auditorium of Concordia University, in Montreal.

The topic is the history and iconic nature of the Periodic Table, in high quality video, about one hour:

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2012

Wonderful Life with the Elements

From the Japanese artist Bunpei Yorifuji comes Wonderful Life with the Elements, an illustrated guide to the periodic table that gives chemistry a friendly face, available from Amazon.

In this super periodic table, every element is a unique character whose properties are represented visually: heavy elements are fat, man-made elements are robots, and noble gases sport impressive afros. Every detail is significant, from the length of an element's beard to the clothes on its back. You'll also learn about each element's discovery, its common uses, and other vital stats like whether it floats - or explodes - in water.

There is also a full review with more images from Wired.

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2012

Scientific American: The Quest for the Periodic Table

From Scientific American, a series of original articles (scanned) dealing with the development of the periodic table dating from 1861 to 1998.

Edited by Eric Scerri.

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2012

Eric Scerri Lecture, Dedicated to Fernando Dufour

Dr. Eric Scerri from the Chemistry Department at UCLA giving a distinguished invited lecture at the Oscar Peterson auditorium of Concordia University, in Montreal. The topic is the history and iconic nature of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Electronegativity Chart (Leach)

From Mark R Leach's paper, Concerning electronegativity as a basic elemental property and why the periodic table is usually represented in its medium form, Journal & PDF.

Due to the importance of Pauling's electronegativity scale, as published in The Nature of The Chemical Bond (1960), where electronegativity ranges from Cs 0.7 to F 4.0, all the other electronegativity scales are routinely normalised with respect to Pauling's range.

When the Pauling, Revised Pauling, Mulliken, Sanderson and Allred-Rochow electronegativity scales are plotted together against atomic number, Z, the similarity of the data can be observed. The solid line shows the averaged data:

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2013

30 Second Elements

30 Second Elements The 50 most significant elements, each explained in half a minute. A book Edited by Eric Scerri and published by Ivy Press.

"30 Second Elements presents you with the foundations of chemical knowledge, distilling the 50 most significant chemical elements into half-a-minute individual entries, using nothing more than two pages, 300 words and one picture. Divided into seven chapters, it includes the atomic details of the other 68 elements and the relationships of all 118, as well as biographies of the chemists who transformed scientific knowledge and unlocked the mysteries of life itself. Illustrated with explosive graphics, here is the quickest way to know your arsenic from your europium".

The curator of this website is a contributor:

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2013

From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement

A paper in J.Chem. Ed.: From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement

Emili Besalú, Departament de Química i Institut de Química Computacíonal i Catàlisis, Universitat de Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69, 17071 Girona, Catalonia, Spain.

J. Chem. Educ., 2013, 90 (8), pp 1009-1013 DOI: 10.1021/ed3004534 Publication Date (Web)

"A periodic table is constructed from the consideration of periodic properties and the application of the principal components analysis technique. This procedure is useful for objects classification and data reduction and has been used in the field of chemistry for many applications, such as lanthanides, molecules, or conformers classification. From the information given, the whole procedure can be reproduced by any interested reader having a basic background in statistics and with the help of the supplementary material provided. Intermediate calculations are instructive because they quantify several concepts the students know only at a qualitative level. The final scores representation reveals an unexpected periodic table presenting some interesting features and points for discussion."

<From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement>

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2013

Twitter @periodic_table

The Twitter feed from Mark Winter of WebElements:

Fictional Elements

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2013

Top 10 Periodic Tables

There are more than 1000 periodic tables hosted by the Chemogenesis Webbook Periodic Table database, so it can be a little difficult to find the exceptional ones.

Here we present – in our humble opinionThe ten most significant periodic tables in the database.

We present the best:


Three Excellent, Data Rich Periodic Tables

The first three of our top 10 periodic tables are classic element data repositories.

They all work in the same way: click on the element symbol to get data/information about the selected element. The three are Mark Winter's WebElements, Theo Gray's Photographic Periodic Table & Michael Dayah's Ptable.

<Web Elements>

Photographic Periodic Table

Ptable


Five Formulations Showing The History & Development

The next five examples deal with history and development Periodic Table. The first is Dalton's 1808 list of elements, next is Mendeleev's 1869 Tabelle I, then Werner's remarkably modern looking 1905 formulation. This is followed by Janet's Left Step formulation and then a discussion of how and why the commonly used medium form PT formulation, is constructed.

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

Mendeleev's Tabelle I

Werner's 1905 Periodic Table

Janet's Left Step

modern (and commonly employed) periodic table

electronegativity periodic table


An Alternative Formulation

The internet database contains many, many alternative formulations, and these are often spiral and/or three dimensional. These exemplified by the 1965 Alexander DeskTopper Arrangement. To see the variety of formulations available, check out the Spiral & Helical and 3-Dimensional formulations in the database:

Alexander DeskTopper Arrangement


Non-Chemistry PTs

The periodic table as a motif is a useful and commonly used infographic template for arranging many types of object with, from 50 to 150 members.

There are numerous examples in the Non-Chemistry section where dozens of completely random representations can be found:

Non-Chemistry Periodic Table

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2014

Rogue Elements: What's Wrong with the Periodic Table

An article in New Scientist by Celeste Biever (news editor at Nature), Image by Martin Reznik

Weights gone awry, elements changing position, the ructions of relativity – chemistry's iconic chart is far from stable, and no one knows where it will end

IF IMITATION is the sincerest form of flattery, the periodic table has many true admirers. Typefaces, types of meat and even the Muppets have been ordered in its image. For chemists, knowing an element's position in the periodic table, and the company it keeps, is still the most reliable indicator of its properties – and a precious guide in the search for new substances. "It rivals Darwin's Origin of Species in terms of the impact of bringing order out of chaos," says Peter Edwards of the University of Oxford.

The origins of the periodic table lie in the 19th century, when chemists noticed that patterns began to emerge among the known chemical elements when they... click here to continue:

What's wrong

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2015

Elements: A Series of Business Radio Programs/Podcasts

A series of BBC World Service Radio Programs, available as MP3 Podcasts, talking about the chemical elements with a strong business/technology bias, rather than the more usual chemical or historical approach:

Quantum Fold Periodic Table

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2015

Oliver Sacks' Table of Elements

From Radiolab (a podcast):

"As a young boy, neurologist, author and Radiolab favorite Oliver Sacks pored over the pages of the Handbook of Physics and Chemistry, fantasizing about the day that he, like the shy gas Xenon, would find a companion with whom to connect and share. That companion turned out to be the Periodic Table of the Elements itself, a relationship he's never outgrown. He introduces us to the elements that he's known and loved."

Oliver Sacks

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2015

Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements is a multimedia project about one of the great adventures in the history of science: the long (and continuing) quest to understand what the world is made of – to identify, understand and organize the basic building blocks of matter. In a nutshell, the project is about the human story behind the Periodic Table of the Elements.

The centerpiece of the project is a three-hour series that premieres Aug. 19, 2015 on PBS. The Mystery of Matter introduces viewers to some of history's most extraordinary scientists:

The Mystery of Matter will show not only what these scientific explorers discovered but also how, using actors to reveal the creative process through the scientists' own words, and conveying their landmark discoveries through re-enactments shot with replicas of their original lab equipment. Knitting these strands together into a coherent, compelling whole is host Michael Emerson, a two-time Emmy Award-winning actor best known for his roles on Lost and Person of Interest. Eric Scerri appears as the expert.

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2016

Mystery of Matter: Three Videos

From Alpha-Omega, three videos about the discovery of the Periodic Table.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements is an exciting series about one of the great adventures in the history of science: the long and continuing quest to understand what the world is made of. Three episodes tell the story of seven of history's most important scientists as they seek to identify, understand and organize the basic building blocks of matter.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements shows us not only what these scientific explorers discovered but also how, using actors to reveal the creative process through the scientists' own words and conveying their landmark discoveries through re-enactments shot with replicas of their original lab equipment.

Knitting these strands together is host Michael Emerson, a two-time Emmy Award-winning actor.

Meet Joseph Priestley and Antoine Lavoisier, whose discovery of oxygen led to the modern science of chemistry, and Humphry Davy, who made electricity a powerful new tool in the search for elements.

Watch Dmitri Mendeleev invent the Periodic Table, and see Marie Curie's groundbreaking research on radioactivity crack open a window into the atom.

The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements brings the history of science to life for today's television audience.:

 

 

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2017

Habashi Book: The Periodic Table & Mendeleev

By Fathi Habashi, a small book:

Courtines 3D PT

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2017

Gray's Wooden Periodic Table Table Video

Theo Gray collects elements and has put together this awesome Periodic Table Table. This week Reactions explores the science and chemistry going on inside this periodic table.

Step into his office at Wolfram Research, and you'll see a silicon disc engraved with Homer Simpson, a jar of mercury, uranium shells and thousands of other chemical artifacts. But his real DIY masterpiece is the world's first "periodic table table". Within this masterfully constructed table-top lay samples of nearly every element known to man, minus the super-radioactive ones.

Theo Gray is 2011 winner of the ACS Grady Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public. The Periodic Table Table is a testament to Theo's love for chemistry -- as well as his Ebay buying habits -- and is full of fascinating stories.

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2017

Restrepo's Similarity Landscape

Building Classes of Similar Chemical Elements from Binary Compounds and Their Stoichiometries by Guillermo Restrepo, Chapter 5 from: Elements Old and New: Discoveries, Developments, Challenges, and Environmental Implications p 95-110.

From the abstract:

Similarity is one of the key concepts of the periodic table, which was historically addressed by assessing the resemblance of chemical elements through that of their compounds. A contemporary approach to the similarity among elements is through quantum chemistry, based on the resemblance of the electronic properties of the atoms involved. In spite of having two approaches, the historical one has been almost abandoned and the quantum chemical oversimplified to free atoms, which are of little interest for chemistry. Here we show that a mathematical and computational historical approach yields well-known chemical similarities of chemical elements when studied through binary compounds and their stoichiometries; these similarities are also in agreement with quantum chemistry results for bound atoms. The results come from the analysis of 4,700 binary compounds of 94 chemical elements through the definition of neighbourhoods for every element that were contrasted producing similarity classes. The method detected classes of elements with different patterns on the periodic table, e.g. vertical similarities as in the alkali metals, horizontal ones as in the 4th-row platinum metals and mixed similarities as in the actinoids with some transition metals. We anticipate the methodology here presented to be a starting point for more temporal and even more detailed studies of the periodic table.

Lindsay's Periodic Table

Thanks to René for the tip!

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2018

Timelines, of The Periodic Table

By Steven Murov, a chronology of the events that have resulted in our present periodic table of the elements and a celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Mendeleev (birthday, 02/08/1834) periodic table (1869).

Recursively, the Murov website has many links to this [Chemogenesis] website.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2018

Race to Invent the Periodic Table

From PBS Digital Studios, a short-but-fast-moving video about the development of the periodic table during the 19th century, and a discussion about gallium:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed

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2018

Alphabet of Chemistry

A BBC World Service radio program, first broadcast Tue 23 Jan 2018.

The Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev attempted nothing less than to pull apart the fabric of reality and expose the hidden patterns that lie beneath everything in existence, from shoes and ships and sealing wax to cabbages and kings. The result was something known to almost everyone who has ever been to school: the Periodic Table of the elements. But why this particular arrangement? And why is it still the foundation of chemistry?

The presenter Quentin Cooper is joined by:

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2018

Mendeleev to Oganesson: A Multidisciplinary Perspective on the Periodic Table

Since 1969, the international chemistry community has only held conferences on the topic of the Periodic Table three times, and the 2012 conference in Cusco, Peru was the first in almost a decade. The conference was highly interdisciplinary, featuring papers on geology, physics, mathematical and theoretical chemistry, the history and philosophy of chemistry, and chemical education, from the most reputable Periodic Table scholars across the world. Eric Scerri and Guillermo Restrepo have collected fifteen of the strongest papers presented at this conference, from the most notable Periodic Table scholars. The collected volume will contain pieces on chemistry, philosophy of science, applied mathematics, and science education.

Eric Scerri is a leading philosopher of science specializing in the history and philosophy of chemistry and especially the periodic table. He is the author of numerous OUP books including A Tale of Seven Scientists and a New Philosophy of Science (2016) and The Periodic Table: A Very Short Introduction (2012). Scerri has been a full-time lecturer at UCLA for the past eighteen years where he regularly teaches classes in history and philosophy of science.

Guillermo Restrepo is a chemist specializing in mathematical and philosophy of chemistry with more than sixty scientific papers and book chapters on these and related areas. Restrepo was a professor of chemistry at the Universidad de Pamplona (Colombia) between 2004 and 2017, and since 2014 has been in Germany as an Alexander von Humboldt Fellow at Leipzig University and more recently as researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Mathematics in the Sciences.

    Preface
1. Heavy, Superheavy...Quo Vadis?
2. Nuclear Lattice Model and the Electronic Configuration of the Chemical Elements
3. Amateurs and Professionals in Chemistry: The Case of the Periodic System
4. The Periodic System: A Mathematical Approach
5. The "Chemical Mechanics" of the Periodic Table
6. The Grand Periodic Function
7. What Elements Belong in Group 3 of the Periodic Table?
8. The Periodic Table Retrieved from Density Functional Theory Based Concepts: The Electron Density, the Shape Function and the Linear Response Function
9. Resemioticization of Periodicity: A Social Semiotic Perspective
10. Organizing the Transition Metals
11. The Earth Scientist's Periodic Table of the Elements and Their Ions: A New Periodic Table Founded on Non-Traditional Concepts
12. The Origin of Mendeleev's Discovery of the Periodic System
13. Richard Abegg and the Periodic Table
14. The Chemist as Philosopher: D. I. Mendeleev's "The Unit" and "Worldview"
15. The Philosophical Importance of the Periodic Table

Publisher     Amazon

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2019

Physical Origin of Chemical Periodicities in the System of Elements

From de Gruyter: Physical origin of chemical periodicities in the system of elements, Chang-Su Cao, Han-Shi Hu, Jun Li* and W. H. Eugen Schwarz*, Pure Appl. Chem. 2019; 91(12).

Published Online: 2019-11-30 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.1515/pac-2019-0901 (open access)

Abstract:

The Periodic Law, one of the great discoveries in human history, is magnificent in the art of chemistry. Different arrangements of chemical elements in differently shaped Periodic Tables serve for different purposes. "Can this Periodic Table be derived from quantum chemistry or physics?" can only be answered positively, if the internal structure of the Periodic Table is explicitly connected to facts and data from chemistry.

Quantum chemical rationalization of such a Periodic Tables is achieved by explaining the details of energies and radii of atomic core and valence orbitals in the leading electron configurations of chemically bonded atoms. The coarse horizontal pseudo-periodicity in seven rows of 2, 8, 8, 18, 18, 32, 32 members is triggered by the low energy of and large gap above the 1s and nsp valence shells (2 ≤ n ≤ 6 !). The pseudo-periodicity, in particular the wavy variation of the elemental properties in the four longer rows, is due to the different behaviors of the s and p vs. d and f pairs of atomic valence shells along the ordered array of elements. The so-called secondary or vertical periodicity is related to pseudo-periodic changes of the atomic core shells.

The Periodic Law of the naturally given System of Elements describes the trends of the many chemical properties displayed inside the Chemical Periodic Tables. While the general physical laws of quantum mechanics form a simple network, their application to the unlimited field of chemical materials under ambient 'human' conditions results in a complex and somewhat accidental structure inside the Table that fits to some more or less symmetric outer shape. Periodic Tables designed after some creative concept for the overall appearance are of interest in non-chemical fields of wisdom and art.

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2019

Möbius-Escher Periodic Table

A comment article in Nature by Prof. Eric Scerri about quantum mechanics and the periodic table:

"Can quantum ideas explain chemistry's greatest icon? Simplistic assumptions about the periodic table lead us astray.

"Such has been the scientific and cultural impact of Dmitri Mendeleev's periodic table of the elements that many people assume it is essentially complete. [But] in its 150th year, can researchers simply raise a toast to the table's many dividends, and occasionally incorporate another heavy synthetic element?

"No – this invaluable compilation is still not settled. The placements of certain elements, even hydrogen and helium, are debated."

The article is accompanied by a fantastic illustration by Señor Salme with ideas from the Möbius strip and M.C. Escher:

Click image to enlarge:

Another Señor Salme PT image:

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2019

International Year of the Periodic Table (in Paris and Moscow)

Prof. Martyn Poliakoff of The University on Nottingham and Periodic Videos at the opening of the International Year of the Periodic Table:

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2019

Kultovoy's Periodic Table Book

Nicolay Kultovoy, website, as sent me a copy of his Periodic Table book, entitled [Google Translate]: Book 5. Part 11-08. A single quantum mechanical model of the structure of the atomic nucleus and the periodic table of chemical elements of D.I. Mendeleev.

In a mixture of Russian & English, the PDF of the book can be viewed here.

Chapter 1. Triune (electrons, nucleons, chemical elements) quantum mechanical model of Colt. Three
1.1 the Rules of filling of the orbits of electrons.
1.2 Pyramidal lattice.
1.3 models with cubic sieve.
1.4 models with face-centered lattice.
1.5 quantum Mechanical form of the periodic table of chemical elements.
1.6 Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table.
 
Chapter 2. A lattice model of the nucleus. Model 62
2.1 Berezovsky G. N.
2.2 I. Boldov
2.4 Konovalov.
2.5 Manturov V.
2.6 Semikov S. A.
2.7 alpha-partial model of the atomic nucleus.
2.8 Burtaev V.
 
Chapter 3. Various lattice (crystal) model of the nucleus of an atom. One hundred five
3.0 Luis Pauling.
3.1 Valery Tsimmerman. ADOMAH Periodic Table. Model 3-2.
3.2 Klishev B. V. Model 3-1.
3.3 Garai J. Model 3-1.
3.4 Winger E Model 4-2.
3.5 Norman D. Cook. Model 4-1.
3.6 Gamal A. Nasser. Model 4-1.
3.7 D. Asanbaeva Model 4-1.
3.8 Datsuk V. K.
3.9 Bolotov B.
3.10 Djibladze M. I.
3.11 Dyukin S. V.
3.12 A. N. Mishin.
3.13 M. M. Protodyakonov
3.14 Dry I. N.
3.15 Ulf-G. Meißner.
3.16 Foreign works.
 
Chapter 4. Long-period periodic table. One hundred eighty one
4.1 long-Period representation of the periodic table.
4.2 Artamonov, G. N.
4.3 Galiulin R. V.
4.4 E. K. Spirin
4.5. Khoroshavin L.
4.6 Step form proposed by Thomsen and Bohr.
4.7 Symmetrical shape of the periodic table.
 
Chapter 5. Construction of a periodic table based on the structure of orbitals. Two hundred twenty one
5.1 construction of the periodic table on the basis of orbitals.
5.2 Short V. M.
5.3 Kulakov, the Novosibirsk table of multiplets.
 
Chapter 6. Atomic structure. Two hundred forty eight
6.1 Table of isotopes.
6.2 the structure of the orbitals.

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2019

St Catharine's College: Celebrating the Periodic Table

The United Nations have proclaimed 2019 to be the International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements since it is the 150th anniversary of the publication of Dmitri Mendeleev's first Periodic Table. But was it really the first?

St Catharine's College, Cambridge, in the UK, is proud to exhibit its fine collection of material relating to the early development of the Periodic Table. Starting from the first list of elements which emerged around the time of the French Revolution in the late 1780s, and the first list of atomic masses drawn up by Manchester chemist John Dalton, we explore why six different chemists from around the world each came up with their own versions of the iconic table in the 1860s.

From the RSC Website:

"Curated by periodic table superfan Peter Wothers, the main body of the exhibition is a staggering collection of historic books that trace the creation of chemistry's roadmap.

"This is an unprecedented record of the periodic table's origins, from early alchemical texts through to original copies of Antoine Lavoisier's 1789 Elementary Treatise of Chemistry – the first true list of elements – and notes on the discoveries of (among others) John Newlands, Julius Lothar Meyer through to Dmitri Mendeleev".

Celebrating the periodic table – the first edition of Mendeleev's textbook from Chemistry World on Vimeo.

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2019

Evolution and Understanding of the d-Block Elements in the Periodic Table

Edwin C. Constable's review, Evolution and understanding of the d-block elements in the periodic table:

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2019

Nucleosynthesis of the Heavy Elements

A PBS video explaining how neutron star mergers lead to the formation of heavy elements, and how a merger only 80 million years before the formation of the solar system, 4.5 billions years ago, seeded the Earth wth the heavy elements of the periodic table:

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2019

5 Periodic Tables We Don't Use (And One We Do)

SciShow says:

"From Mendeleev's original design to physicist-favorite "left-step" rendition, the periodic table of elements has gone through many iterations since it was first used to organize elements 150 years ago - each with its own useful insights into the patterns of the elements":

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2019

Papers of Mendeleev, Odlings, Newlands & Chancourtois from the 1860s

Peter Wothers from the University of Cambridge with Sir Martyn Poliakoff, of the University of Nottingham discuss the discovery/development of the periodic table in the 1860s with the original publications.

Links to some of the formulations discussed in the video:

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2019

Meyer's NYT Graphic

A nice graphic by Alex Eben Meyer in the New York Times accompanying an article about the periodic table and some of Sir Martyn Poliakoff ideas.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Where Mendeleev Was Wrong

A paper by Gábor Lente, Where Mendeleev was wrong: predicted elements that have never been found, from ChemTexts https://doi.org/10.1007/s40828-019-0092-5.

As is well known, Mendeleev sucessfully predicted the existance of several elements, but he was not always correct.

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Bloomberg Businessweek: Why the Periodic Table of Elements Is More Important Than Ever

A Bloomberg Businessweek article on the chemical elements: Mendeleev's 150-year-old periodic table has become the menu for a world hungry for material benefits. (This story is from Bloomberg Businessweek's special issue The Elements.)

Thanks to Roy Alexander for the tip! 

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2019

Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue: The Elements

A Bloomberg Businessweek Special Issue on The Elements.

Using state of the art [2019] web graphics, and packed with interesting business stories:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Mendeleev 150

Mendeleev 150 is the 4th International Conference on the Periodic Table. The event welcomed nearly 300 guests from over 30 countries and has become one of the key events of IUPAC's International Year of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

C&EN No Agreement

From C&EN: The periodic table is an icon. But chemists still can't agree on how to arrange it:

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Scerri's The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance 2nd Edition

The 2nd Edition of Eric Scerri's well regarded book, The Periodic Table: Its Story & Its Significance has been published by Oxford University Press and is available at all good bookshops, including online.

See Eric's website EricScerri.com and Twitter Feed.



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2019

International Year of the Periodic Table with Eric Scerri

Interview with leading expert on the periodic table and UCLA professor, Eric Scerri, to celebrate the International Year of the Periodic Table.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Elemental Podcast

Radio New Zealand Podcast: Elemental, A journey through the periodic table of elements with chemistry professor Allan Blackman, from AUT, and Alison Ballance

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2019

Schmiermund's The Discovery of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

Torsten Schmiermund's book: The Discovery of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements (Springer, in German)

Google Translate:

150 years ago, in 1869, D. I. Mendeleev and L. Meyer independently published their ideas on the arrangement of the chemical elements in a periodic system. The United Nations and UNESCO therefore declared 2019 the "International Year of the Periodic Table". The question arises what is so special about this "simple table". Embark on a short journey into the history of the periodic table with the author. Get to know its predecessors and see how the Periodic Table of the Elements has evolved over the years. Discover the periodic properties of the elements. Find out what makes the periodic table so interesting and timeless, and see what other ideas there are and have been.

The author, Torsten Schmiermund has worked as a chemical engineer in the chemical industry for many years.

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2020

What Is A Chemical Element?

A Collection of Essays by Chemists, Philosophers, Historians, and Educators Edited by Eric Scerri and Elena Ghibaudi published by Oxford University Press

The concept of a chemical element is foundational within the field of chemistry, but there is wide disagreement over its definition. Even the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) claims two distinct definitions: a species of atoms versus one which identifies chemical elements with the simple substances bearing their names. The double definition of elements proposed by the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry contrasts an abstract meaning and an operational one. Nevertheless, the philosophical aspects of this notion are not fully captured by the IUPAC definitions, despite the fact that they were crucial for the construction of the Periodic Table. Although rich scientific literature on the element and the periodic table exists as well as a recent growth in the philosophy of chemistry, scholars are still searching for a definitive answer to this important question: What is an element?

Eric Scerri and Elena Ghibaudi have teamed up to assemble a group of scholars to provide readers an overview of the current state of the debate on chemical elements from epistemological, historical, and educational perspectives. What Is A Chemical Element? fills a gap for the benefit of the whole chemistry community-experimental researchers, philosophers, chemistry educators, and anyone looking to learn more about the elements of the periodic table.

Foreword
Introduction
CHAPTER 1: The many questions raised by the dual concept of 'element' Eric R. Scerri
CHAPTER 2: From simple substance to chemical element Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent
CHAPTER 3: Dmitrii Mendeleev's concept of the chemical element prior to the Periodic Law Nathan M. Brooks
CHAPTER 4: Referring to chemical elements and compounds: Colourless airs in late eighteenth century chemical practice Geoffrey Blumenthal, James Ladyman, and Vanessa Seifert
CHAPTER 5: The Changing Relation Between Atomicity and Elementarity: From Lavoisier to Dalton Marina P. Banchetti-Robino
CHAPTER 6: Origins of the Ambiguity of the Current Definition of Chemical Element Joseph E. Earley
CHAPTER 7: The Existence of Elements, and the Elements of Existence Robin F. Hendry
CHAPTER 8: Kant, Cassirer, and the Idea of Chemical Element Farzad Mahootian
CHAPTER 9: The Operational Definition of the Elements: A Philosophical Reappraisal Joachim Schummer
CHAPTER 10: Substance and Function: The case of Chemical Elements Jean-Pierre Llored
CHAPTER 11: Making elements Klaus Ruthenberg
CHAPTER 12: A formal approach to the conceptual development of chemical element Guillermo Restrepo
CHAPTER 13: Chemical Elements and Chemical Substances: Rethinking Paneth's Distinction Sara N. Hjimans
CHAPTER 14: The dual conception of the chemical element: epistemic aspects and implications for chemical education Elena Ghibaudi, Alberto Regis, and Ezio Roletto
Appendix: Reference list on the philosophy of chemistry Index.

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2020

Scerri's Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements

From Eric Scerri, a periodic table of books about the periodic table & the chemical elements... many by Eric Scerri himself.

Eric Scerri, UCLA, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Click to enlarge:

There is no particular connection between each of the elements and the book associated with it in the table, with the exception of: H, He, N, Ti, V, Nb, Ag, La, Au, Ac, U, Pu & Og.

The following is a list of references for each of the 118 books featured on Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements. Books published in languages other than English are shown in color. They include the Catalan, Croatian, French, German, Italian, Norwegian & Spanish languages:

1 H J. Ridgen, Hydrogen, the Essential Element, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2002.
2 He W.M. Sears Jr., Helium, The Disappearing Element, Springer, Berlin, 2015.
3 Li K. Lew, The Alkali Metals, Rosen Central, New York, 2009.
4 Be S. Esteban Santos, La Historia del Sistema Periodico, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, 2009. (Spanish)
5 B E.R. Scerri. The Periodic Table, Its Story and Its Significance, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, New York, 2020.
6 C U. Lagerkvist, The Periodic Table and a Missed Nobel Prize, World Scientific, Singapore, 2012.
7 N W.B. Jensen, Mendeleev on the Periodic Law: Selected Writings, 1869–1905, Dover, Mineola, NY, 2005.
8 O M. Kaji, H. Kragh, G. Pallo, (eds.), Early Responses to the Periodic System, Oxford University, Press, New York, 2015.
9 F E. Mazurs, Graphic Representation of the Periodic System During One Hundred Years, Alabama University Press, Tuscaloosa, AL, 1974.
10 Ne T. Gray, The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe, Black Dog & Leventhal, 2009.
11 Na N.C. Norman, Periodicity and the s- and p-Block Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2007.
12 Mg M. Gordin, A Well-Ordered Thing, Dimitrii Mendeleev and the Shadow of the Periodic Table, 2nd edition, Basic Books, New York, 2019.
13 Al S. Kean, The Disappearing Spoon, Little, Brown & Co., New York, 2010.
14 Si P.A. Cox, The Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1989.
15 P J. Emsley, The 13th Element: The Sordid Tale of Murder, Fire, and Phosphorus, Wiley, New York, 2002.
16 S P. Parsons, G. Dixon, The Periodic Table: A Field Guide to the Elements, Qurcus, London, 2014.
17 Cl P. Levi, The Periodic Table, Schocken, New York, 1995.
18 Ar B.D. Wiker, The Mystery of the Periodic Table, Bethlehem Books, New York, 2003.
19 K H. Alderesey-Williams, Periodic Tales, Viking Press, 2011.
20 Ca P. Strathern, Mendeleyev's Dream, Hamish-Hamilton, London, 1999.
21 Sc D. Scott, Around the World in 18 Elements, Royal Society of Chemistry, London, 2015.
22 Ti E. W. Collings, Gerhard Welsch, Materials Properties Handbook: Titanium Alloys, ASM International, Geauga County, Ohio, 1994.
23 V D. Rehder, Bioinorganic Vanadium Chemistry, Wiley-Blackwell, Weinheim, 2008.
24 Cr K. Chapman, Superheavy, Bloomsbury Sigma, New York, 2019.
25 Mn E.R. Scerri, E. Ghibaudi (eds.), What is an Element? Oxford University Press, New York, 2020.
26 Fe M. Soon Lee, Elemental Haiku, Ten Speed Press, New York, 2019.
27 Co J. Emsley, Nature's Building Blocks, An A-Z Guide to the Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2001.
28 Ni T. James, Elemental, Robinson, London, 2018.
29 Cu E.R. Scerri, The Periodic Table, Its Story and Its Significance, Oxford University Press, New York, 2007.
30 Zn H. Rossotti, Diverse Atoms, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1998.
31 Ga P. Ball, A Very Short Introduction to the Elements, Oxford University Press, 2004.
32 Ge I. Asimov, The Building Blocks of the Universe, Lancer Books, New York, 1966.
33 As J. Browne, Seven Elements that Changed the World, Weidenfeld and Nicholson, London, 2013.
34 Se N. Raos, Bezbroj Lica Periodnog Sustava Elemenata, Technical Museum of Zagreb, Croatia, 2010. (Croatian)
35 Br P. Strathern, The Knowledge, The Periodic Table, Quadrille Publishing, London, 2015.
36 Kr A. Ede, The Chemical Element, Greenwood Press, Westport, CT, 2006.
37 Rb A. Stwertka, The Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1998.
38 Sr E.R. Scerri, A Tale of Seven Elements, Oxford University Press, New York, 2013.
39 Y H.-J. Quadbeck-Seeger, World of the Elements, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2007.
40 Zr M. Fontani, M. Costa, M.V. Orna (eds.), The Lost Elements, Oxford University Press, New York, 2015.
41 Nb M. Seegers, T. Peeters (eds.), Niobium: Chemical Properties, Applications and Environmental Effects, Nova Science Publishers, New York, 2013.
42 Mo E.R. Scerri, Selected Papers on the Periodic Table, Imperial College Press, Imperial College Press, London and Singapore, 2009.
43 Tc A. Dingle, The Periodic Table, Elements with Style, Kingfisher, Richmond, B.C. Canada, 2007.
44 Ru G. Rudorf, Das periodische System, seine Geschichte und Bedeutung für die chemische Sysytematik, Hamburg-Leipzig, 1904. (German)
45 Rh I. Nechaev, G.W. Jenkins, The Chemical Elements, Tarquin Publications, Publications, Norfolk, UK, 1997.
46 Pd P. Davern, The Periodic Table of Poems, No Starch Press, San Francisco, 2020.
47 Ag C. Fenau, Non-ferrous metals from Ag to Zn, Unicore, Brussells, 2002.
48 Cd J. Van Spronsen, The Periodic System of the Chemical Elements, A History of the First Hundred Years, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1969.
49 In M. Tweed, Essential Elements, Walker and Company, New York, 2003.
50 Sn M.E. Weeks, Discovery of the Elements, Journal of Chemical Education, Easton PA, 1960.
51 Sb P. Wothers, Antimony Gold Jupiter's Wolf, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2019.
52 Te W. Zhu, Chemical Elements in Life, World Scientific Press, Singapore, 2020.
53 I O. Sacks, Uncle Tungsten, Vintage Books, New York, 2001.
54 Xe E.R. Scerri, (ed.), 30-Second Elements, Icon Books, London, 2013.
55 Cs M. Jacob (ed.), It's Elemental: The Periodic Table, Celebrating 80th Anniversary, Chemical & Engineering News, American Chemical Society, Washington D.C., 2003.
56 Ba J. Marshall, Discovery of the Elements, Pearson Custom Publishing, New York,1998.
57 La K. Veronense, Rare, Prometheus Books, Amherst, New York, 2015.
58 Ce N. Holt, The Periodic Table of Football, Ebury Publishing, London, 2016.
59 Pr S. Alvarez, C. Mans, 150 Ans de Taules Périodiques a la Universitat de Barcelona, Edicions de la Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 2019. (Catalan)
60 Nd L. Garzon Ruiperez, De Mendeleiev a Los Superelementos, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, 1988. (Spanish)
61 Pm P. Ball, A Guided Tour of the Ingredients, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2002.
62 Sm S. Esteban Santos, La Historia del Sistema Periodico, Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia, Madrid, 2009. (Spanish).
63 Eu A. E. Garrett, The Periodic Law, D. Appleton & Co., New York, 1909.
64 Gd M.S. Sethi, M. Satake, Periodic Tables and Periodic Properties, Discovery Publishing House, Delhi, India, 1992.
65 Tb M. Eesa, The cosmic history of the elements: A brief journey through the creation of the chemical elements and the history of the periodic table, Createspace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012.
66 Dy P. Depovere, La Classification périodique des éléments, De Boeck, Bruxelles, 2002. (French).
67 Ho F. Habashi, The Periodic Table & Mendeleev, Laval University Press, Quebec, 2017.
68 Er W.J. Nuttall, R. Clarke, B. Glowacki, The Future of Helium as a Natural Resource, Routledge, London, 2014.
69 Tm R.D. Osorio Giraldo, M.V. Alzate Cano, La Tabla Periodica, Bogota, Colombia, 2010. (Spanish).
70 Yb P.R. Polo, El Profeta del Orden Quimico, Mendeleiev, Nivola, Spain, 2008. (Spanish).
71 Lu E.R. Scerri, A Very Short Introduction to the Periodic Table, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2019.
72 Hf D.H. Rouvray, R.B. King, The Mathematics of the Periodic Table, Nova Scientific Publishers, New York, 2006.
73 Ta P. Thyssen, A. Ceulemans, Shattered Symmetry, Oxford University Press, New York, 2017.
74 W P.W. Atkins, The Periodic Kingdom, Basic Books, New York, NY, 1995.
75 Re D.G. Cooper, The Periodic Table, 3rd edition. Butterworths, London, 1964.
76 Os E. Lassner, W.-D. Schubert, Tungsten: Properties, Chemistry, Technology of the Element, Alloys, and Chemical Compounds, Springer, Berlin, 1999.
77 Ir J.C.A. Boeyens, D.C. Levendis, Number Theory and the Periodicity of Matter, Springer, Berlin, 2008.
78 Pt R. Hefferlin, Periodic Systems and their Relation to the Systematic Analysis of Molecular Data, Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, NY, 1989.
79 Au R.J. Puddephatt, The Chemistry of Gold, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1978.
80 Hg D.H. Rouvray, R.B. King, The Periodic Table Into the 21st Century, Research Studies Press, Baldock, UK, 2004.
81 Tl R.E. Krebs, The History and Use of Our Earth's Chemical Elements, Greenwood Publishing Group, Santa Barbara, CA, 2006.
82 Pb E. Torgsen, Genier, sjarlataner og 50 bøtter med urin - Historien om det periodiske system, Spartacus, 2018. (Norwegian).
83 Bi K. Buchanan, D. Roller, Memorize the Periodic Table, Memory Worldwide Pty Limited, 2013.
84 Po D. Morris, The Last Sorcerers, The Path from Alchemy to the Periodic Table, Joseph Henry Press, New York, 2003.
85 At T. Jackson, The Elements, Shelter Harbor Press, New York, 2012.
86 Rn R.J.P. Williams, J.J.R. Frausto da Silva, The Natural Selection of the Chemical Elements: The Environment and Life's Chemistry, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1997.
87 Fr G. Rudorf, The Periodic Classification and the Problem of Chemical Evolution, Whittaker & Co., London, New York, 1900.
88 Ra L. Van Gorp, Elements, Compass Point Books, Manakato, MN, 2008.
89 Ac G.T. Seaborg, J.J. Katz, L.R. Morss, Chemistry of the Actinide Elements, Springer, Berlin, 1986.
90 Th G. Münzenberg, Superheavy Elements - Searching for the End of the Periodic Table, Manipal Universal Press, India, 2018.
91 Pa A. Castillejos Salazar, La Tabla Periòdica: Abecedario de la Quimica, Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, D.F. Mexico, 2005. (Spanish).
92 U T. Zoellner, Uranium, Penguin Books, London, 2009.
93 Np J. Barrett, Atomic Structure and Periodicity, Royal Society of Chemistry, London, 2002.
94 Pu J. Bernstein, Plutonium, Joseph Henry, Washington DC, 2007.
95 Am S. Hofmann, Beyond Uranium, Taylor & Francis, London, 2002.
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104 Rf R.J. Puddephatt, The Periodic Table of the Elements, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1972.
105 Db L. Ohrström, The Last Alchemist in Paris, Oxford University Press, New York, 2013.
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110 Ds I. Nechaev, Chemical Elements, Lindsay Drummond, 1946.
111 Rg F. Hund, Linienspektren und Periodisches System Der Elemente, Springer, Berlin, 1927.
112 Cn F.P. Venable, The Development of the Periodic Law, Chemical Publishing Co., Easton, PA, 1896.
113 Nh O. Baca Mendoza, Leyes Geneticas de los Elementos Quimicos. Nuevo Sistema Periodico, Universidad Nacional de Cuzco, Cuzco, Peru, 1953 (Spanish).
114 Fl B. Yorifuji, Wonderful Life with the Elements, No Starch Press, San Francisco, 2012.
115 Mc D.I. Mendeléeff, The Principles of Chemistry, American Home Library, New York, 1902.
116 Lv A. Lima-de-Faria, Periodic Tables Unifying Living Organisms at the Molecular Level: The Predictive Power of the Law of Periodicity, World Scientific Press, Singapore, 2018.
117 Ts H.B. Gray, J.D. Simon, W.C. Trogler, Braving the Elements, University Science Books, Sausalito, CA, 1995.
118 Og E.R. Scerri, G. Restrepo, Mendeleev to Oganesson, Oxford University Press, New York, 2018.

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2020

Rayner-Canham's The Periodic Table: Past, Present, and Future

A book by Geoff Rayner-Canham, The Periodic Table: Past, Present, and Future.

https://doi.org/10.1142/11775 | August 2020

Contents:

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2020

Scerri's Periodic Table of Books About The Periodic Table & The Chemical Elements by ERS

From Eric Scerri, a periodic table of books about the periodic table & the chemical elements... by Eric Scerri, including translations.

Eric Scerri, UCLA, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

Click to enlarge:

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2020

Workshop on Teaching 3d-4s Orbitals Presented by Dr. Eric Scerri

Dr. Eric Scerri, UCLA Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, discusses many of the issues concerning the periodic table: the aufbau principle, Madelung's rule, the electronic and anomalous electronic structures of the transition elements, the Sc2+ ion, the Janet Left Step, Group 3: Sc, Y, Lu, Lr vs. Sc, Y, La, Ac, atomic spectroscopy, etc.

Many of the topics that concern those of us interested in the periodic table are discussed.

Thanks to Eric Scerri – who appears – for the tip! 
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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