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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

Text search:       


Periodic Table formulations from the year 2005:

2005   Laing's Revised Periodic Table with the Lanthanides Repositioned
2005   Cyclical Continuum of Elemental Properties
2005   Atom Flowers
2005   Cereal Typologies Periodic Table
2005   Nerdiness Periodic Table
2005   Atomic Radii Periodic Table
2005   Ionic Radii Periodic Table
2005   Extraction from Ore to Pure Element
2005   Geologist's Periodic Table
2005   Criminal Elements Periodic Table
2005   Merck Periodic Table of The Elements
2005   Student's Periodic Table
2005   Minerals by Chemical Composition
2005   Fundamental Particles
2005   Artist's Periodic Table
2005   Languages, Periodic Table of
2005   Money, Periodic Table of
2005   Painting of The Elements
2005   Smart Elements
2005   Pyramid Format Periodic Table
2005   Pictures, Periodic Table of
2005   Górski's Atomic Core Based Periodic System
2005   Chemical Thesaurus Reaction Chemistry Database Periodic Table


2005

Laing's Revised Periodic Table with the Lanthanides Repositioned

Michael Laing's "Revised Periodic Table with the Lanthanides Repositioned", from Foundations of Chemistry 7:203-233.

Philip Stewart's modification of the Laing formulation:

Philip Stewart says (in a personal communication):

"It seems wrong to suggest an analogy between Pr to Sm and Dy to Tm with the V, Cr, Mn, Fe groups. I have pushed them to the right to suggest that those lanthanides are like the old group VIII (including the coinage metals); like them they cannot use all their outer electrons in bonding (with the exception of Ru viii and Os viii. I have treated the actinides differently to take account of Pa v and U vi. It's ability to lose the juxtaposition of Tc and Pm, but it is physical rather than chemical anyway."

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2005

Cyclical Continuum of Elemental Properties by Robert R. Northup

The Cyclical Continuum of Elemental Properties Periodic Table by Robert R. Northup

"The Cyclical Continuum of Elemental Properties is a user-friendly teaching tool that is intended to accompany the Periodic Table of Elements. Hydrogen is shown at the center, atomic numbers and symbols form an unbroken spiral, and element groups 1 through 18 (noble gases, alkali metals, halogens, etc.) are displayed by colored arcs. Beginning chemistry students can visually see the continuity of atomic numbers in the Cyclical Continuum as a way to introduce and orient them to the Periodic Table. Advanced chemistry students can test their understanding of the Periodic Table's organization by applying that knowledge to interpretation of the Cyclical Continuum."

Read more and buy the poster at the Cyclical Continuum web site.

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2005

AtomFlowers by Boy Boer

A periodic table that gives a representation of the electron orbitals that look like flowers:

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2005

Cereal Typologies

A chart on cereal typologies published in 2wice:

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2005

Nerdiness

A chart in GQ, by Fred Woodward, on nerdiness:

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2005

Atomic Radii Periodic Table

By Mark Leach

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2005

Ionic Radii Periodic Table

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2005

Extraction from Ore to Pure Element

A periodic table showing how pure elements are extracted:

Highly electropositive elements (Na, K) and electronegative elements (Cl2, F2) can only be obtained by electrolysis.

By Mark Leach

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2005 Geologist's Periodic Table

Atmophile Elements - noble gases and covalently bonded gaseous molecules. The atoms and molecules are attracted by weak van der Waals forces and so these elements remain gaseous at room temperature.

Lithophile Elements - Those elements which form ionic bonds generally have filled outer electron shells. They typically bond to oxygen in silicates and oxides.

Siderophile Elements - The metals near iron in the periodic table that exhibit metallic bonding, have a weak affinity for oxygen and sulfur and are readily soluble in molten iron. Examples include iron, nickel, cobalt, platinum, gold, tin, and tantalum. These elements are depleted in the earth crust because they have partitioned into the earth's iron core.

Chalcophile Elements - The elements that bond to S, Se, Te, Sb, and As. These bonds are predominantly covalent in character.

As discussed in more detail here.

By Mark Leach

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2005 Criminal Elements

A periodic table of criminal elements:

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2005

Merck Periodic Table of The Elements

The Merck periodic table of the elements, here:

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2005

Student's Periodic Table

Students are expected to know that in all equations hydrogen is molecular should [nearly always] be written as H2. Likewise, nitrogen is N2, oxygen O2, fluorine F2, chlorine Cl2, bromine Br2 and iodine I2. But somehow students are expected to know that molecular sulfur, S8, should be written as S and molecular phosphorus, P4, should be written as P.

By Mark Leach

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2005

Minerals by Chemical Composition

Lists minerals by percent element. From the excellent webmineral mineralogy database:

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2005

Fundamental Particles

A periodic table of Fundamental Particles. Click on the image to go to the website and access a 7000 x 5000 sized image:

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2005

Artist's Periodic Table

“Periodic Table” found object assemblage and construction. Dimensions variable, by David Redfern:

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2005

Languages

A periodic table of languages, here:

and for sale here:

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2005

Money

A periodic table of money, here:

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2005

Painting of The Elements

From Gabrielle David's website, here, a painting called Elements, inspired by Melinda Green's Periodic Fractal formulation of 1995:

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2005

Smart Elements

Smart Elements, at smart-elements.com, is a company selling physical samples of chemical elements for research, education & collection.

Smart Elements sell numerous examples of all the naturally occuring elements. For example they sell 26 copper, Cu, products including samples in acrylic blocks, vials and bottles:

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2005

Pyramid Format Periodic Table

From Wikipedia, this Pyramid Format Periodic Table is Based on a graphic from Scholten J."Secret Lanthanides", 2005, ISBN 90-74817-16-5;

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2005

Pictures, Periodic Table of

By Keith Enevoldsen, a Periodic Table of The Elements in Pictures:

 

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2005

Górski's Atomic Core Based Periodic System

From Go?rski A., Pol. J. Chem., 79, 1435 (2005), an atomic core based periodic system of the chemical elements. In this version of the Periodic Table, He is placed close to H and simultaneously above Be (and not above Ne):

Górski's Atomic Core Based Periodic System

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2005

Chemical Thesaurus Reaction Chemistry Database Periodic Table

A periodic table front end to the Chemical Thesaurus Reaction Chemistry Database Periodic Table. Clicking on an element gives access to database searches of chemical species and their interactions.

A quote neatly sums up what the ChemThes reaction chemistry database project is trying to achieve:

"The Chemical Thesaurus is a reaction chemistry information system that extends traditional references by providing hyperlinks between related information. The program goes a long way toward meeting its ambitious goal of creating a nonlinear reference for reaction information. With its built-in connections, organizing themes, and multiple ways to sort and view data, The Chemical Thesaurus is much greater than the sum of the data in its database.

"The program does an excellent job of removing the artificial barriers between different subdisciplinary areas of chemistry by presenting a unified vision of inorganic and organic reaction chemistry."

K.R. Cousins, JACS, 123, 35, pp 8645-6 (2001)

Chemical Thesaurus Reaction Chemistry Database

By Mark Leach

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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