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The INTERNET Database of Periodic Tables

There are thousands of periodic tables in web space, but this is the only comprehensive database of periodic tables & periodic system formulations. If you know of an interesting periodic table that is missing, please contact the database curator: Mark R. Leach Ph.D.

Use the drop menus below to search & select from the more than 1100 Period Tables in the database:

Text search:       


Periodic Table formulations from the year 2013:

2013   Classic Rock Periodic Chart
2013   Twitter Handle Periodic Table
2013   Twin Spiral Pi Trinomial - Based Periodic Table
2013   Macro-Valence Cells vs Jovian Image and Red Spot Location Periodic Table
2013   Fattah's Periodic Table
2013   7 Elemental Chemical Synthesis
2013   Electronegativity Chart (Leach)
2013   MCAS Electron Orbital Filling
2013   RSC Visual Elements Periodic Table: Alchemy
2013   London, Periodic Table of
2013   Wine, Periodic Table of
2013   Google Panda: Periodic Table of SEO
2013   Flag of Nation of Discoverer Periodic Table
2013   He(isenberg) T-Shirt
2013   Element of Confusion T-Shirt
2013   Spectraphonic Periodic Table
2013   Higgs Boson and Fundamental Particle/Force Periodic Tables
2013   Scientific American Interactive Periodic Table
2013   Fattah's Extended Periodic Table
2013   HTML Periodic Table of the Elements
2013   Proton Configuration Periodic Table
2013   4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table
2013   Shapes Periodic Table
2013   30 Second Elements
2013   3D Left Step Periodic Table
2013   From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement
2013   Periodic Pyramid
2013   Bernard Periodic Spiral
2013   Alcohol, Periodic Table of
2013   Muppets, Periodic Tables of
2013   County of Discovery Periodic Table
2013   Fictional Elements Periodic Table
2013   Twitter @periodic_table
2013   Simplest Periodic Table
2013   Top 10 Periodic Tables
2013   Underground Map of the Elements
2013   Don't Trust Atoms...
2013   Matrix Series Periodic Table
2013   Music Notes of Periodic Table
2013   Joke
2013   Breaking Bad Periodic Table
2013   Electronic Configuration Periodic Table
2013   Averaged Ionisation Potential Periodic Table
2013   Model Wooden Periodic Table
2013   Muradjan's Mathematical Structure of The Periodic Table
2013   Atomic Periodic Town
2013   Spider Chart of The Periodic Table of Chemical Elements
2013   Stardust Periodic Table of The Elements
2013   Ye Olde Periodic Table
2013   Labarca & Zambon's Formulation


2013

Classic Rock Periodic Chart

A Periodic Chart of Classic Rock by Van Dieman... look more closely:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Twitter Handle Periodic Table

From Stuart Cantrill of Chemical Connections:

So, you're a chemist and you've finally decided to find out what all the fuss is about with this thing called Twitter. You decide to sign up, but, for whatever reason, you don't fancy using your own name. Maybe an element; that would be cool wouldn't it?

You are a chemist after all. Maybe you work with Grubbs' catalyst a lot, and you like the idea of being @ruthenium. Or perhaps Stille/Suzuki/Heck couplings are your thing and so @palladium seems appropriate.

Not into metals? Well why not @fluorine, @helium or @bromine?

Well, I'm sorry to report that all of those are taken, but there are 114 named elements (we're ignoring those ununelementium placeholder names) to choose from. Surely some of the more exotic elements must be there for the taking?

Well, no. Gone. All of 'em.

Thought you'd sneak in and claim one of the two newest additions to the periodic table @flerovium or @livermorium? Sorry, you've been beaten.

Here is the periodic table of Twitter, with all the accounts linked:

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2013

Twin Spiral Pi Trinomial - Based Periodic Table

A Twin Spiral Pi Trinomial - Based Periodic Table by Bill Harrington, Founder/CTO of Rainforest Reactor Research and Temporal Dynamics Laboratory. For full size, click the image:

 

 

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2013

Macro-Valence Cells vs Jovian Image and Red Spot Location Periodic Table

A Macro-Valence Cells vs Jovian Image and Red Spot Location Periodic Table by Bill Harrington, Founder/CTO of Rainforest Reactor Research and Temporal Dynamics Laboratory. For full size, click the image:

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2013

Fattah's Periodic Table

A new vertical periodic table by Dr. Khalid A. FATTAH, Faculty of Eng., Karary University, Khartoum, Sudan. For full size, click the image:

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2013

7 Elemental Chemical Synthesis

The Mystics Guide to Elemental Chemistry, by bzylman at deviantart:

[A] poster is designed to geek out the chemist and the mystic alike. It is a variation on the periodic table of chemical elements that have been rearranged into a circular structure based upon their proton count and chemical family, augmented with the concept of the 7 mystic elements of earth, air, fire, water, metal, wood and void. It was very interesting to work upon once I hit the correct organization of elements that they lined up almost perfectly.

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2013

Electronegativity Chart (Leach)

From Mark R Leach's paper, Concerning electronegativity as a basic elemental property and why the periodic table is usually represented in its medium form, Journal & PDF.

Due to the importance of Pauling's electronegativity scale, as published in The Nature of The Chemical Bond (1960), where electronegativity ranges from Cs 0.7 to F 4.0, all the other electronegativity scales are routinely normalised with respect to Pauling's range.

When the Pauling, Revised Pauling, Mulliken, Sanderson and Allred-Rochow electronegativity scales are plotted together against atomic number, Z, the similarity of the data can be observed. The solid line shows the averaged data:

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2013

MCAS Electron Orbital Filling

From Joel M Williams:

"While the periodic table arrangement is usefully interpreted in columns of similar behavior, it is erroneous to imply that the underlying orbitals are all the same for all the elements in the columns of a block. Sub-orbital information has been excluded! From the standpoint of chemistry, the rule of eight would have provided better imagery on which to build an orbital system than was Bohr's orb turned-sphere. A sphere is useless from a chemical standpoint. Hybridization should not have to occur to explain the simplest of molecules. Simplicity would have the electrons occupying orbital spaces that are similar in shape. Only three orbital types are actually needed to describe the electron packing of the elements. Octahedral, square-planar, and pyramidal coordination complexes of the transition elements follow logically without the need to hybridize. This brief paper describes a rational packing of electrons around a nucleus that ends up mimicking the familiar periodic table when compressed to similar behavior."

 

Modeling the MCAS Way describes this concept of "building blocks" and can be found here.

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2013

RSC Visual Elements Periodic Table: Alchemy

From the RSC Website: "Alchemists are often described as the first chemists. They developed an extraordinary language (rather than the chemical symbols we use today) to describe all manner of things, from chemical reactions to philosophical tenets. Click on ‘What is Alchemy?’ to learn about the three aims of the alchemists. Click on each of the alchemical symbols for more information and to see alternative symbols."

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2013

London, Periodic Table of

Like the Tube Map, the Periodic Table is an endlessly fascinating thing. Over the years, the format has been adapted to all kinds of schemes. A few years ago, we tried to make sense of London in this way, by arranging important facets of the capital into rows and columns. It's been a while, so we've now updated it, with a few changed entries and a general tidy up. Can you work out the identity of each London 'element'? Can you spot hidden patterns and trends? Can you suggest improvements?

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Wine, Periodic Table of

A Periodic Table of Wine by ComputerGear:

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2013

Google Panda: Periodic Table of SEO

Panda is a is a 2011 change to Google's search results ranking algorithm aimed to lower the rank of 'low-quality sites' or 'thin sites' and return higher-quality sites near the top of the search results.

The PT below, from spotaleopard.com, is a graphic to help web developers make their sites 'Panda friendly':

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2013

Flag of Nation of Discoverer Periodic Table

A periodic table showing the national flag of the discoverer:

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2013

He(isenberg) T-Shirt

From Bad Idea T-Shirts:

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2013

Element of Confusion T-Shirt

From Bad Idea T-Shirts:

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2013

Spectraphonic Periodic Table

Relax and enjoy the Spectraphonic Periodic Table of the Elements, the first and only periodic table where you may hear the characteristic light signature (spectra) of each element dropped forty octaves into the auditory range. Hear the sounds of the atoms. Experience the building blocks of reality... of the Universe... of You.:

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2013

Higgs Boson and Fundamental Particle/Force Periodic Tables

The Higgs boson sits at the heart of the Standard Model of particle physics, and so is at the centre of periodic table type representations of quarks, leptons and forces.

Three representations by the UCR Today, a video interview with Particle Fever editor Walter Murch: "The Higgs boson is kind of a MacGuffin" and from im9.eu:

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2013

Scientific American Interactive Periodic Table

From Scientific American, The Elements Revealed: An Interactive Periodic Table.

Many elements have links with articles on individual elements which first appeared in Nature Chemistry and were not previously available on-line:

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Fattah's Extended Periodic Table

A new vertical periodic table (Extended) by Dr. Khalid A. FATTAH, Faculty of Eng., Karary University, Khartoum, Sudan:

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2013

HTML Periodic Table of the Elements

Periodic Table of HTML Elements, by Josh Duck, has an inspector that allows you to see which elements are being used on any website you enter:

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2013

Proton Configuration Periodic Table

A Periodic Table of Proton Configurations by Radoslav Rasko Jovanovic:

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2013

4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri Periodic Table

By Jgmoxness

"I've replaced the standard periodic table in the 7th "Chemistry Pane" of my E8 visualizer with a 2D/3D/4D Stowe-Janet-Scerri version of the Periodic Table."

"Interestingly, it has 120 elements, which is the number of vertices in the 600 Cell or the positive half of the 240 E8 roots. It is integrated into VisibLie_E8 so clicking on an element adds that particular atomic number's E8 group vertex number to the 3rd E8 visualizer pane. The code is a revision and extension of Enrique Zeleny's Wolfram Demonstration":

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2013

Shapes Periodic Table

By ScienceIsGolden.com comes the Periodic Table of Shapes. The site is worth clicking around, as there is a lot of good PT stuff to find:

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2013

30 Second Elements

30 Second Elements The 50 most significant elements, each explained in half a minute. A book Edited by Eric Scerri and published by Ivy Press.

"30 Second Elements presents you with the foundations of chemical knowledge, distilling the 50 most significant chemical elements into half-a-minute individual entries, using nothing more than two pages, 300 words and one picture. Divided into seven chapters, it includes the atomic details of the other 68 elements and the relationships of all 118, as well as biographies of the chemists who transformed scientific knowledge and unlocked the mysteries of life itself. Illustrated with explosive graphics, here is the quickest way to know your arsenic from your europium".

The curator of this website is a contributor:

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2013

3D Left Step Periodic Table

By Masahiko Suenaga, Kyushu University, Japan a 3D Left Step Periodic Table.

"Inspired by the work of Dr. Tsimmerman and Dr. Samanez, I have created a new 3D Left Step Periodic Table, which resembles to Mt. Fuji, recently registered as a World Heritage site. For more information, please visit my website":

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2013

From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement

A paper in J.Chem. Ed.: From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement

Emili Besalú, Departament de Química i Institut de Química Computacíonal i Catàlisis, Universitat de Girona, C/Maria Aurèlia Capmany, 69, 17071 Girona, Catalonia, Spain.

J. Chem. Educ., 2013, 90 (8), pp 1009-1013 DOI: 10.1021/ed3004534 Publication Date (Web)

"A periodic table is constructed from the consideration of periodic properties and the application of the principal components analysis technique. This procedure is useful for objects classification and data reduction and has been used in the field of chemistry for many applications, such as lanthanides, molecules, or conformers classification. From the information given, the whole procedure can be reproduced by any interested reader having a basic background in statistics and with the help of the supplementary material provided. Intermediate calculations are instructive because they quantify several concepts the students know only at a qualitative level. The final scores representation reveals an unexpected periodic table presenting some interesting features and points for discussion."

<From Periodic Properties to a Periodic Table Arrangement>

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2013

Periodic Pyramid

A Periodic Pyramid by Jennifer N. Hennigan and W. Tandy Grubbs * Department of Chemistry, Stetson University, DeLand, Florida 32723, United States

J. Chem. Educ., 2013, 90 (8), pp 1003-1008 DOI: 10.1021/ed3007567 Publication Date (Web): June 21, 2013

The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy the shells identified by the principle quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The numbers 2, 8, 18, and 32 are shown in this work to be related to the triangular numbers from mathematical number theory. The relationship to the triangular numbers, in turn, suggests an alternate method for arranging elements in terms of periodicity. The resulting three-dimensional "periodic pyramid" is highly symmetric in shape. Just as is true in the modern periodic table, each layer of the periodic pyramid can be separated into shell and subshell contributions. Examining the pyramid's structure is arguably a pedagogically useful activity for college-level introductory or physical chemistry students, as it provides an opportunity to further ponder the shell model of the atom and the origins of periodicity. The connections to number theory are used to show that the outermost subshell of a given shell contains (2n - 1) orbitals.

<Periodic Pyramid>

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Bernard Periodic Spiral

The Bernard Periodic Spiral of the Elements (BPSE), depicts a novel rendition of the Periodic Table that replaces the flat rectangular format with a continuous unidirectional spiral that maintains all the properties of Group and Period formation.

Comparisons may be made with similar models spanning the last three decades of the 20th century (Alexander, 1971; Mazurs, 1974; & Kaufman, 1999).

In the chart form, this new rendition is referred to as the Elliptical Periodic Chart of the Elements. In the three-dimensional form, the model resembles a Christmas tree in shape with the 7 Periods represented as circular platforms situated at various levels with the elements placed appropriately at the outer edges of each of these platforms as a Period builds up. The elements may be represented as spherical objects or flat discs with radii proportionate to atomic radii (or reasonable approximations). Color schemes accentuate the four different Blocks of elements: the s-Block (green), the p-Block (blue, with the exception that the last Group is red signifying the end of a Period), d-Block (orange), and the f-Block (yellow). The grey section, called the Group-Period Interchange, is where the end of a particular Period connects to the beginning of the next Period, and, at the same time, transitions from Group 18 to Group 1.

Watch the video here:

<Bernard Periodic Spiral>

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Alcohol, Periodic Table of

From visual.ly, a Periodic Table of Alcohol. Click here for full size:

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Muppets, Periodic Tables of

By Mike Baboon Design, a Periodic Table of The Muppets:

Muppets, Periodic Tables of

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2013

County of Discovery Periodic Table

Jamie Gallagher – scientist, engineer, science communicator, salsa teacher and part time comic – has produced a periodic table showing the county of origin of the discoverer:

County of Discovery Periodic Table

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2013

Fictional Elements Periodic Table

This interactive graphic, from fictionalmaterials.com, contains fictional materials from games, animated shows, comic books, movies, books, television and more.

If you hover over an element in the source infographic, it displays the origin and properties of the fictional element:

Fictional Elements

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2013

Twitter @periodic_table

The Twitter feed from Mark Winter of WebElements:

Fictional Elements

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2013

Simplest Periodic Table

No numbers, just dots by London-based graphic designer Alison Haigh.

Each element is represented by a visualization of its electronic structure, rather than by numbers and letters:

Dots

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2013

Top 10 Periodic Tables

There are more than 1000 periodic tables hosted by the Chemogenesis Webbook Periodic Table database, so it can be a little difficult to find the exceptional ones.

Here we present – in our humble opinionThe ten most significant periodic tables in the database.

We present the best:


Three Excellent, Data Rich Periodic Tables

The first three of our top 10 periodic tables are classic element data repositories.

They all work in the same way: click on the element symbol to get data/information about the selected element. The three are Mark Winter's WebElements, Theo Gray's Photographic Periodic Table & Michael Dayah's Ptable.

<Web Elements>

Photographic Periodic Table

Ptable


Five Formulations Showing The History & Development

The next five examples deal with history and development Periodic Table. The first is Dalton's 1808 list of elements, next is Mendeleev's 1869 Tabelle I, then Werner's remarkably modern looking 1905 formulation. This is followed by Janet's Left Step formulation and then a discussion of how and why the commonly used medium form PT formulation, is constructed.

<Eight-Group Periodic Table>

Mendeleev's Tabelle I

Werner's 1905 Periodic Table

Janet's Left Step

modern (and commonly employed) periodic table

electronegativity periodic table


An Alternative Formulation

The internet database contains many, many alternative formulations, and these are often spiral and/or three dimensional. These exemplified by the 1965 Alexander DeskTopper Arrangement. To see the variety of formulations available, check out the Spiral & Helical and 3-Dimensional formulations in the database:

Alexander DeskTopper Arrangement


Non-Chemistry PTs

The periodic table as a motif is a useful and commonly used infographic template for arranging many types of object with, from 50 to 150 members.

There are numerous examples in the Non-Chemistry section where dozens of completely random representations can be found:

Non-Chemistry Periodic Table

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2013

Underground Map of the Elements

By Dr Mark Lorch of the University of Hull, an Underground Map of the Elements.

From here: "My son loves trains. So I came up with a train related twist to an inspection of the periodic table. We sat and cut up a copy of the table and then rearranged each element as a 'station' on an underground rail system. Each line represents a characteristic shared by the elements on that line":

Underground Map of the Elements

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip!
See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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2013

Don't Trust Atoms...

From Facebook... or buy the T-Shirt:

don't trust atoms

never trust atoms

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2013

Matrix Series Periodic Table

By Richard Kingstone, a Matrix Series Periodic Table. Read more here.

The Janet Periodic Table (aka Left Step Table) may be re-arranged as a series of square matrices. Each element is represented as a cell and is identified by the atomic number (Z), shown as the upper number of each cell.

The quantum numbers (n, l, mL, mS) determine the location of an element within the table. The quantum pair (n, l ) are the lower numbers in each cell. Four matrices are required, each matrix is identified by a 'matrix number' (a) as shown below;:

Matrix Periodic Table

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2013

Music Notes of Periodic Table

By Claude Bayeh, a Musical Notes formulation:

Music Notes of Periodic Table

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2013

Joke

Joke

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2013

Breaking Bad Periodic Table

The TV series Breaking Bad uses Br (35) and Ba (56) in the logo, and Beutler Ink have constructed a full periodic table or characters and 'additional elements':

Breaking Bad Periodic Table

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2013

Electronic Configuration Periodic Table

From the Encyclopedia of Metalloproteins, page 1407 published by Springer, 2013 (ISBN: 978-1-4614-1532-9) a periodic table of electronic configurations:

Electronic Configuration  Periodic Table

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2013

Averaged Ionisation Potential Periodic Table

By Leland Allen, a representation of the periodic table with the third dimension of energy derived from the averaged ionisation potentials of the s and p electrons. (Allen suggested that this was a direct measure of electronegativity). From J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1989, 111, 9004:

Averaged Ionisation Potential

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2013

Model Wooden Periodic Table

From here, and translated from Spanish:

Among the events commemorating the 75th anniversary of the creation of the School of Treball, the author of this site, B. Navarro, along with J. Semis and J. Gràcia have built a model wooden periodic table.

The table has been divided into 5 areas: representative elements, noble gases, transition elements, rare earths and finally the groups I and II of alkali and alkaline earth together. Each of these areas of the table is made with a different type of wood. The block transition elements is made with oak, ash noble gases, representative elements in cherry, sapele the rare earth and alkali/alcalinoterros beechwood.

The central idea of the model is that each element is represented by a cube of 3 cm edge so that you can see on all sides, from left to right or right to left without losing the order of increasing atomic number or the relative position of the elements:

Wooden Periodic TableWooden Periodic Table

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2013

Muradjan's Mathematical Structure of The Periodic Table

From the website periodictablemathstructure:

Abstract:

The Periodic Table with a new double numerical structure, presented here is attempt to find table form which will in some new way represent the periodicity and symmetry of the Elements, with the Periodic System as base. Also this tetrahedral laminar table structure maybe will became a base for developing a new shell structure of atomic nucleus. This new rearrangement of the chemical element is based on mathematical formula which result is simple, length of the periods:

Math Periodic Table

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2013

Atomic Periodic Town

Three related formulations by Baha Tangour (Tangour Bahoueddine), the Atomic Town and two Boomerang periodic tables.

Baha says: "The propositions are different representation of a 3D dimensions that depend on three properties (spectral term multiplicity, lone-pairs and period number)":

Kabbalistic

 

Kabbalistic

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2013

Spider Chart of The Periodic Table of Chemical Elements

A Spider Chart linking together various ideas about the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements by Roy Alexander (of Alexander Arrangement fame).

Click here to embiggen the image:

Spider Chart

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2013

Stardust Periodic Table of The Elements

Inspired by Carl Sagan, Stardust Elements introduces a display case of the periodic table of the elements with real high purity samples:

Stardust Elements

Stardust Elements

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2013

Ye Olde Periodic Table

From the Serious Severity blog, a spoof of this formulation:

ye olde periodic table

Thanks to Marcus Lynch for the tip!

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2013

Labarca & Zambon's Formulation

Labarca & Zambon's new representation of the periodic system.

A reconceptualization of the element concept as a basis for a new representation of the periodic system, Martín Labarca and Alfio Zambon, Educ. Quím., 24(1), 63-70, 2013.

"The aim of this paper is to propose a new conceptualization of the term 'element' as the basis for a new representation of the periodic system. For this purpose we begin by recalling the dual sense of the concept of element. Next, we develop the 'limits isotopes' argument which is the basis of the new periodic chart. This task leads us both to reconceptualize the notion of element and to characterize the term 'basic substance'. In turn, the argument is used to face the epistemological problem with hydrogen and helium in the periodic table. Finally, the Döbereiner's triads are used to calculate atomic masses in three periodic charts: the medium-long-form, the modified 'left-step' proposed by Scerri, and the proposed in this work. Evaluation results allows us to stand out the fruitful predictive power of our periodic system.

"The 46 blocks of elements are ordered vertically by the increasing number of neutrons of the lighter isotope (primary criterion) and, horizontally, by the increasing atomic number (secondary criterion). The subscript represents the value of L - Z and the superscript the value of Z."

Thanks to Eric Scerri for the tip! See the website EricScerri.com and Eric's Twitter Feed.

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What is the Periodic Table Showing? Periodicity

© Mark R. Leach Ph.D. 1999 –


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